International Religious Freedom Report 2007
Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor

The Constitution provides for freedom of religion, and the Government generally respected this right in practice.

There was no change in the status of respect for religious freedom by the Government during the period covered by this report, and government policy continued to contribute to the generally free practice of religion.

There were no reports of societal abuses or discrimination based on religious belief or practice.

The U.S. Government discusses religious freedom issues with the Government as part of its overall policy to promote human rights.

Section I. Religious Demography

The country, including the islands of Grenada, Carriacou, and Petite Martinique, has an area of 133 square miles and in 2004 a population of just under 105,000. There are 96,000 persons on the island of Grenada, 8,000 on Carriacou, and 900 on Petite Martinique. According to the most recent census (2001), 44 percent of the general population is Roman Catholic, 12 percent is Anglican, 11 percent is Pentecostal, and 11 percent is Seventh-day Adventist. Religious groups with 2 percent or more adherents include Methodist, Presbyterian, Church of God, Baptist, and Evangelical. Religious groups with 1 percent or less of the total population include Jehovah's Witnesses, Brethren, Baha'i, Hindu, Moravian, Muslim, Presbyterian, Rastafarian, and Salvation Army. In addition, there are small communities of Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons) and Mennonites. Approximately 4 percent of the population count themselves as nonbelievers. There is one mosque. A number of denominations increase each year with the influx of 3,700 mostly foreign university students; however, the Government does not count them in its census data.

Reportedly more than 60 percent of the population regularly participated in formal religious services.

Section II. Status of Religious Freedom

Legal/Policy Framework

The Constitution provides for freedom of religion, and the Government generally respected this right in practice. The Government at all levels sought to protect this right in full and did not tolerate its abuse, either by governmental or private actors.

The Government is secular and does not interfere with an individual's right to worship.

Only the Christian holy days of Good Friday, Corpus Christi, Easter, Whit Monday, and Christmas are national holidays.

Religious groups must register with the Prime Minister's Office, which is responsible for issuing licenses for religious groups, buildings, and events. Registration entitles them to some customs and import tax exemptions.

Restrictions on Religious Freedom

Government policy and practice contributed to the generally free practice of religion.

There were no reports of religious prisoners or detainees in the country.

Forced Religious Conversion

There were no reports of forced religious conversion, including of minor U.S. citizens who had been abducted or illegally removed from the United States, or of the refusal to allow such citizens to be returned to the United States.

Section III. Societal Abuses and Discrimination

There were no reports of societal abuses or discrimination based on religious belief or practice.

The Conference of Churches Grenada, which was created over a decade ago, facilitated closer relations among various religious organizations. In 2004 hurricane Ivan damaged 98 percent of the churches. Faith-based organizations continued their collaboration to repair damaged churches.

Section IV. U.S. Government Policy

The U.S. Government discusses religious freedom issues with the Government as part of its overall policy to promote human rights.

[This is a mobile copy of Grenada]