U.S. Department of State
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U.S. Government Assistance

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DoS (INL) Budget by Region

FY 2000 - FY 2001

($000)

FY 2000 Actual

FY 2000 Em. Supp.(1)

FY 2001 Estimate

Narcotics Programs(2)

-

-

-

Country Programs

-

-

-

Latin America

-

-

-

Bahamas

1,000

-

1,200

Bolivia

48,000

110,000

52,000

Brazil

1,500

4,500

2,000

Colombia

55,929

838,500

48,000

Ecuador

1,200

20,000

2,200

Guatemala

3,000

-

3,000

Jamaica

800

-

1,200

Mexico

4,071

-

10,000

Peru

48,000

32,000

48,000

Venezuela

700

3,500

1,200

Latin America Regional

8,793

10,000

8,957

Subtotal for Latin America

172,993

1,018,500

177,757

Asia/Africa/Middle East

-

-

-

Laos

4,000

-

4,200

Pakistan

3,250

-

3,500

Thailand

3,000

-

3,000

Asia/Africa/ME Regional

4,798

-

3,328

Subtotal for Asia/Africa/ME

15,048

-

14,028

Interregional Aviation Support

50,000

-

50,000

Total Country Programs

238,041

1,018,500

241,785

International Organizations

12,000

-

12,000

Law Enforcement Training and Demand Reduction

9,000

-

10,000

Systems Support/Upgrades

5,000

-

4,000

Program Development & Support

9,800

-

11,500

Total Narcotics Programs(3)

273,841

1,018,500

279,285

(1)The Congress provided a $1.0185 billion in Emergency Supplemental funding for Plan Colombia in FY 2000.

(2)Figures for FY 2002 budget request are not available as of March 1, 2001.

(3)Includes a rescission of $1.159 million for FY 2000 and $0.715 for FY 2001.

DoS (INL) Budget by Function

FY 2000 - FY 2001

($000)

FY 2000 Actual

% of Total

FY 2000 Em. Supp.

% of Total

FY 2001 Estimate

% of Total

Narcotics Programs(1)

-

-

-

-

-

-

Law Enforcement Assistance and Institution Development

96,341

35.2

722,500

70.9

94,425

33.8

Alternative Develop/ Eradication

126,535

46.2

296,000

29.1

127,280

45.6

International Organizations

12,000

4.4

-

-

12,000

4.3

Drug Awareness/Demand Reduction

7,395

2.7

-

-

8,395

3.0

Law Enforcement Training

7,000

2.6

-

-

8,000

2.9

Program Development and Support

24,570

9.0

-

-

29,185

10.4

Total Narcotics Programs(2)

273,841

100

1,018,500

100

279,285

100

(1)Figures for FY 2002 budget request are not available as of March 1, 2001.

(2)Includes a rescission of $1.159 million for FY 2000 and $0.715 for FY 2001.

International Training

International counternarcotics training is managed/funded by INL and carried out by the DEA, U.S. Customs Service, and U.S. Coast Guard. Major objectives are:

  • Contributing to the basic infrastructure for carrying out counternarcotics law enforcement activities in countries which cooperate with and are considered significant to U.S. narcotics control efforts;

  • Improving technical skills of drug law enforcement personnel in these countries; and

  • Increasing cooperation between U.S. and foreign law enforcement officials.

Over 4,996 persons participated in the United States Government's international narcotics control training program in FY 2000.

INL training continues to focus on encouraging foreign law enforcement agency self-sufficiency through infrastructure development. The effectiveness of our counternarcotics efforts overseas should be viewed in terms of what has been done to bring about the establishment of effective host country enforcement institutions, thereby taking drugs out of circulation before they begin their journey toward the United States. U.S. law enforcement personnel stationed overseas are increasingly coming to see their prime responsibility as promoting the creation of host government systems that are compatible with and serve the same broad goals as ours.

During FY 2000, law enforcement training continued to devote increased attention to the development and support of infrastructure building in those countries which posed the greatest threat to the U.S. as a result of their role as source or transit countries for narcotics destined for the United States. INL received positive feedback both from U.S. Embassies and foreign governments on the direct benefits gained from this training, including the discovery of illegal narcotics as a result of techniques learned during a program.

INL funding has also been provided for the establishment and operation of International Law Enforcement Academies (ILEA's) in Budapest and Bangkok. The regional training provided at the ILEA's consists of both general law enforcement training as well as specialized training for mid-level managers in police and other law enforcement agencies. Over 2500 officials from 25 countries have received training in Budapest and over 600 officials from 10 countries have received training in Bangkok. It is anticipated that additional ILEA's will be established in the Western Hemisphere and Africa.

INL-funded training will continue to support the major U.S. and international strategies for combating narcotics trafficking worldwide. Emphasis will be placed on contributing to the activities of international organizations, such as the UNDCP and the OAS. Through the meetings of major donors, the Dublin Group, UNDCP and other international fora, we will coordinate with other providers of training, and urge them to shoulder greater responsibility in providing training, which serves their particular strategic interests.

INL will maintain its role of coordinating the activities of U.S. law enforcement agencies in response to requests for assistance from U.S. Embassies. This will avoid duplication of effort and ensure that presentations represent the full range of USG policies and procedures.

Training Statistics

Number of Participants

Number of Programs

Drug Enforcement Administration

-

-

Training in U.S.

-

-

"Vetted" Training

235

7

Training in Host Countries

-

-

In-Country Drug Enforcement Seminar

714

21

Advanced Drug Enforcement Seminar

163

4

Int'l Asset Forfeiture Seminar

173

6

Airport Operations

124

2

Specialized

54

2

ILEA

477

9

Subtotal

1,940

51

U.S. Customs Service

-

-

Training in U.S.

-

-

International Visitors Program

701

193

Training in Host Countries

-

-

Overseas Enforcement Training

381

13

Regional Overseas Enforcement Training

22

1

Train-the-Trainer Workshop

74

5

Short Term Advisory

30

6

Contraband Enforcement Team

108

4

Integrity/Anti-Corruption

114

5

Intelligence Training

45

1

Outbound Currency Interdiction Seminar

30

2

Assessments

-

3

Canine Training (U.S. Based)

6

2

Asset Forfeiture Seminar

25

1

Carrier Initiative Program Seminars/Business Anti-Smuggling Coalition

744

10

Subtotal

2280

246

U.S. Coast Guard

- -

Training in Host Countries

-

-

Maritime Law Enforcement

120

6

Port Security and Safety Course

37

1

Long Term Training

110

1

Subtotal

267

8

Total INL-Funded Training FY 1999

4487

305

Drug Enforcement Administration

The preeminent responsibility of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is to reduce and ultimately minimize the impact posed to our nation by illicit drugs. All cocaine and heroin, as well as some marijuana and other dangerous drugs, are produced outside the United States. These illicit drugs are smuggled from countries of their source, usually through other countries, into the United States Therefore, the reduction of illicit drug availability in the United States requires a strong international counternarcotics strategy. In cooperation and coordination with other nations, as well as with other U.S. agencies, DEA strives to concurrently suppress illicit drug production; disrupt the availability of these drugs in the distribution chain; arrest and prosecute those involved in any aspect of illegal drug trafficking; and seize their profits and assets.

The primary contribution of DEA in implementing our international counter narcotics strategy is accomplished through the 77 offices that DEA maintains in 57 countries worldwide. The DEA overseas mission is as follows:

  • Conduct bilateral investigative activities,

  • Coordinate intelligence gathering,

  • Coordinate training programs for host country police agencies, and

  • Assist in the development of host country drug law enforcement institutions and engage in foreign liaison.

In most countries where DEA maintains offices, DEA carries out all of the above functions. The emphasis on each function is determined by the conditions existing in the host nation. For example, in some countries where the drug enforcement system is advanced, a DEA Country Office may limit its role to selected activities instead of the full range of programs. The following sections provide a few examples of the assistance DEA provided during 2000 to host nation counterparts in support of the four function areas.

Bilateral Investigations

DEA's Country Offices work with elements of the host nation law enforcement agencies to investigate activities of drug traffickers that lead to indictments and prosecutions in either the host country, the United States, or a third country. Whenever appropriate and feasible, DEA shares intelligence information on major traffickers operating in host countries with foreign counterparts to enhance their investigative knowledge. The examples that follow illustrate DEA's role in bilateral investigations.

Based on information provided directly by the Mexico City Country Office (MCCO), Mexican authorities arrested Ismael Higuera-Guerrero, a major member of the Arellano-Felix Organization (AFO), and nine other suspects. Other AFO collaborators captured in 2000 included a former Federal Highway Police director who provided the AFO with insider information and protection, and a Colombian who served as a go-between for Colombia-Mexico drug shipments for the AFO. None of these actions would have been achieved had it not been for the close collaboration between the DEA MCCO and its counterparts in Mexico.

The Costa Rica Country Office, working with host nation counterparts and several DEA foreign and domestic offices, conducted the investigation of a drug trafficker who was linked to the Linear target Jose Guillermo Gomez-Ramirez. The combined effort resulted in the arrest of 23 defendants and the seizure of 1,410 kilograms of cocaine in Costa Rica. Evidence from this investigation led to the U.S. indictment of Gomez and several associates. DEA Panama assisted Panamanian authorities with the arrest of Gomez-Ramirez and an associate. As the first Regional Linear target operating in Central America, Gomez-Ramirez had been the target of investigations conducted by all DEA Central American country offices. Both Gomez-Ramirez and his associate were extradited from Panama to the United States to face Federal Drug Charges.

The Athens Country Office and Istanbul Resident Office worked closely with Turkish National Police and Hellenic National Police on an investigation targeting a heroin transportation organization operating in Istanbul. The investigation resulted in the seizure of 513 kilograms of heroin and the arrest of four defendants in Greece and 23 in Turkey. The Hellenic National Police received permission to conduct a controlled delivery of the heroin after intelligence was developed that the organization was going to utilize two passenger buses to transport a large amount of Southwest Asian heroin to Greece via Turkey. After 48 hours of surveillance, Greek authorities seized the two buses in Athens and found the heroin concealed in the roof of the buses. This marked the largest heroin seizure involving the Istanbul Narcotics Section and also the largest heroin seizure in Greece.

Yardena Habroni, target of a joint money laundering investigation begun in April 1999, was arrested at the Newark Airport upon her arrival from Panama. Habroni, who was indicted out of the Eastern District of New York, used her jewelry business to launder proceeds for several Colombian drug traffickers through false gold purchases/sales and by exchanging cash for second and third party checks, false invoicing, and a multitude of bank transfers. To date, five arrests have been made and numerous search warrants have been effected. This investigation has been significant in that the Government of Panama provided the DEA Panama City Country Office with information crucial in case development.

Sensitive Investigative Units (SIUs) began operations in FY 1998 in Mexico, Colombia, Peru, and Bolivia. Each foreign law enforcement official having access to sensitive information must meet SIU criteria—i.e., an interview, computerized criminal background investigations, security questionnaire/background interview, medical and psychological screening, urinalysis, and a polygraph. By the end of 2000, established SIUs were fully operational in several major narcotics trafficking areas in Thailand. The SIUs represent the best-trained and best-equipped counternarcotics capability under the Royal Thai Police. They have also been able to institutionalize complex law enforcement techniques, as well as U.S. touted concepts of integrity and honesty among its personnel. During 2000 DEA-trained SIUs in Thailand seized hundreds of kilograms of heroin and thousands of kilograms of methamphetamine. The largest seizure in which DEA participated was the result of an operation in which 200 kilograms of methamphetamine tablets were delivered by 12 United Wa State Army operatives to Thai authorities in the Thailand/Burma border region. The operation concluded when Thai and DEA authorities led a controlled delivery to the intended recipients in Bangkok, resulting in one arrest.

Since May 1998, the Bogota Country Office, in conjunction with the Colombian National Police SIU, have been investigating the drug trafficking activities of Alejandro BERNAL-Madrigal. During this investigation, known as Operation Millennium, BERNAL-Madrigal was identified as the most significant drug trafficker operating in Colombia. Evidence obtained during this investigation revealed that his organization was responsible for transporting between 20 and 30 tons of cocaine per month from Colombia to the United States, via Mexico, primarily in containerized cargo. To date, this investigation has yielded 56 arrests in the United States, Mexico, Ecuador, Colombia, and on the high seas. Also, 13.7 metric tons of cocaine have been seized. It is anticipated that the 30 defendants currently incarcerated in Colombia will be extradited to the United States during 2001.

DEA in Argentina spearheaded a year-long investigation that led to the dismantling of the Colombian-based Dessy HIGUERA-Moreno heroin trafficking organization. This multi-national investigation resulted in the identification of 56 organizational members, 25 of whom are in custody. Indictments of four upper tier members of this organization were handed down in the Southern District of Florida and extradition proceedings to the United States are underway.

During the course of the trans-continental investigation against the Ivan De La VEGA organization from Barranquilla, Colombia, law enforcement authorities in Venezuela, Europe, the United States, and on the high seas seized 23 tons of cocaine. De La VEGA transported multi-ton shipments of cocaine produced in Colombia via land into Venezuela. In Venezuela, the cocaine was stored until it was loaded onto merchant ships for transport to criminal organizations in the United States, Greece, and Italy. In a carefully planned "take-down," 8.8 tons of cocaine were seized and 13 suspects were arrested in Venezuela, including De La VEGA who was immediately expelled to face charges in the United States. In total, 43 arrests were made worldwide.

DEA in Bolivia and Bolivian counterparts dismantled the Lorgio SAAVEDRA organization, which produced and distributed multi-hundred kilogram shipments of cocaine base throughout Bolivia, Brazil, Peru and Argentina. Utilizing undercover and extensive surveillance techniques, SAAVEDRA and five members of this organization were arrested and 183 kilograms of cocaine base were seized.

DEA investigations led to the identification in Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR) bank accounts controlled by shelf companies in Panama of approximately $8,800,000 in assets of a Colombian drug trafficker indicted in the United States. Further investigation by the Hong Kong authorities and DEA in Hong Kong and Colombia resulted in the recovery of drug trafficking proceeds in the amount of $8,800,000, representing the second largest recovery by the Hong Kong SAR government since the passage of the Drug Trafficking Ordinance in 1989.

An extensive communications network was used to facilitate coordination and the flow of actionable intelligence on two large multi-national operations involving countries of Central and South America and the Caribbean. Operation Conquistador (March 10-26, 2000) involved 23 countries from this region and Operation Libertador (October 27-November 19, 2000) involved 36 countries from the region. Both operations were established to develop a cohesive/cooperative environment between source and transit nations, consolidate counterdrug activities in the Caribbean, and continue development of a comprehensive regional strategy and disruption of drug trafficking activities.

Under the auspices of "Operation Libertador" two Tegucigalpa Country Office agents, along with Honduran counterparts, were part of a twenty-man team mobile checkpoint at Las Manos, along the Honduran/Nicaraguan border. The team was essential in the seizure of 144 kilograms of cocaine hidden within the false bed of a pick up truck and inside a tractor-trailer. The arrest of seven Guatemalans was attributed to these seizures.

DEA Lima Country Office continued its long-term investigation with the SIU targeting Colombian nationals involved in the collection, distribution, and exportation of multi-hundred quantities of cocaine in Peru. The investigation culminated with the arrest of 25 subjects, including ten Colombian citizens and one Dutch national, and the seizure of 100 kilograms of cocaine HCl. The SIU in Colombia contributed to the investigation by providing information that resulted in the positive identification of Colombian violators operating in Peru.

The Santiago Country Office and the La Paz Country Office, working cooperatively with police counterparts, executed simultaneous search and arrest warrants in Bolivia and Chile as part of a cooperative operation against Bolivian mining company, Tierra Limitada. It is estimated that the Tierra Limitada Organization was responsible for the chemical diversion of at least 10 million kilograms of sulfuric acid. Over 140 Bolivian and Chilean law enforcement officials targeted nine locations in Bolivia and four locations in Chile for simultaneous enforcement actions. Tierra Limitada in Bolivia and two chemical companies in Chile were closed down, and eight individuals have been arrested in Bolivia and seven in Chile.

DEA in the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico, in coordination with Dominican authorities, conducted an investigation of the Maritine PAULINO-CASTRO trafficking organization. This organization was involved in transporting multi-hundred kilogram shipments of cocaine from Colombia to the United States via the Dominican Republic. PAULINO-CASTRO and 13 members of his organization were arrested in the Dominican Republic and an additional 25 were arrested in Puerto Rico.

DEA and counterparts in Ecuador, Colombia, Argentina, and the United States conducted a regional investigation of the Sergio ANDRES-Mino organization, which operated in these countries transporting Colombian heroin to New York. More than 20 kilograms of heroin were seized in Ecuador and an additional 12 were seized in the United States. This multi-national cooperative effort resulted in the arrest of ANDRES-Mino and the principal members of his organization.

DEA assisted in the seizure of 64.5 kilograms of cocaine and the arrest of three individuals in Russia. A 3,000-pound steel mold seized in Miami was transported via a controlled delivery to a warehouse in Moscow. Arrests were made when the individuals began dismantling the mold. In the follow-up of this investigation, Russian authorities seized 9,000 pounds of methaqualone powder.

The Brasilia Country Office and Brazilian authorities conducted an investigation of a multifaceted criminal organization operating in Brazil. Raids in Brazil netted 13 arrests, the seizure of approximately 2.8 million dollars of counterfeit U.S. currency and 143 kilograms of cocaine.

Information shared between the Guatemala Country Office and counterparts resulted in the seizure of 797 kilograms of cocaine concealed in electrical transformers as well as the break up of a large drug trafficking ring located in the Guatemala City International Airport.

A joint investigation between the DEA Miami Field Division, DEA in Spain, and Portuguese authorities led to the arrest of four individuals and the seizure of 1,460 kilograms of cocaine that had been shipped to Portugal from Colombia via Venezuela and Rotterdam.

In February 2000, the Bridgetown, Barbados Country Office participated in the transportation of Charles Miller to the United States to stand trial in South Florida on drug trafficking charges. Mr. Miller operated from the Caribbean island of St. Kitts and was responsible for sending multi-hundred kilogram shipments of cocaine to the United States. He was convicted on December 5, 2000, and is currently awaiting sentencing.

Intelligence Gathering

DEA coordinates intelligence worldwide on the cultivation and manufacture of illicit substances, the sale of precursor chemicals for making illicit drugs, and the transportation routes of these drugs into the United States. The following activities demonstrate the breadth of DEA involvement worldwide.

Subsequent to intelligence from the Los Angeles Field Division and The Hague, Netherlands Country Office, Dutch authorities seized 1.2 million tablets of MDMA and a pound of cocaine. They also arrested a DEA fugitive who had eluded U.S. authorities since their seizure of 2.1 million tablets of MDMA two months prior.

DEA and law enforcement agencies in Greece, Colombia, Venezuela, Spain, Italy, England, and France shared intelligence in an international maritime smuggling investigation. The investigation focused on Colombian drug traffickers. The Hellenic National Police arrested six suspects in Greece. With intelligence gathered by the Athens Country Office, Venezuelan authorities apprehended 11 suspects, including a reputed Colombian drug shipper acting as the mastermind behind the operations, and seized approximately seven and a half tons of cocaine.

DEA Country Offices in Mexico and throughout Central America continued to support, develop, and improve the intelligence collection, analysis, and exchange of each respective country's Joint Intelligence Coordination Center (JICC). This has included installing freight-tracking software, construction of new inspection stations, providing intelligence collection and processing guidance, and fostering interagency cooperation and intelligence sharing. This has allowed the JICCs to share and collect intelligence with the El Paso Intelligence Center (EPIC), other local law enforcement agencies, and their respective Country Offices.

Information provided to the Croatian National Police's Drug Unit by DEA in Austria resulted in the seizure of 241 kilograms of cocaine on a vessel. The vessel was searched with no success; a secondary search by a Croatian dive team located an underwater compartment where they discovered the cocaine.

Intelligence information from The Hague Country Office and New York Field Division led to the arrest in Spain of a DEA fugitive who was wanted in the Southern District of New York on charges of conspiracy to import 200,000 tablets of MDMA from Amsterdam to New York.

DEA in Haiti has been gathering intelligence on routes, methodologies and organizations conducting maritime drug trafficking into and through Haiti. This intelligence resulted in the interception of a vessel 200 miles south of Puerto Rico and the seizure of 1,143 kilograms of cocaine. Fourteen crewmembers were arrested and will be prosecuted in Puerto Rico.

As a result of intelligence provided by DEA Nicaragua, the Nicaraguan National Police seized 131 kilograms of cocaine and arrested two individuals connected to a major drug trafficking organization.

Coordinate Training Programs for Host Country Police Agencies

DEA's international training activities are conducted in coordination with DEA's foreign offices, U.S. Missions, and the Department of State, International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs. The full range of the international antinarcotics training program is addressed in the International Training Section.

Institution Building and Foreign Liaison

DEA Agents establish close relationships and networks with their counterparts that foster cooperation in international drug law enforcement. DEA Agents meet with their counterparts to discuss policy and legislative issues and provide assistance in developing drug control laws and regulations. DEA also provides training and material support to foreign law enforcement partners to help them combat major drug trafficking organizations and the production and transportation of illicit drugs. The activities described below are representative of DEAs efforts in foreign liaison and institution building activities.

In April 2000, DEA sponsored the 18th annual International Drug Enforcement Conference (IDEC). At the conference, senior drug law enforcement officials from 32 member countries throughout the Western Hemisphere and observers from Europe, Asia, and Australia met to discuss and exchange insights on counter narcotics enforcement activities. Presenters described their counter narcotics law enforcement strategies and shared lessons learned from multilateral investigations and operations. Members adopted initiatives pertaining to the development of regional multinational enforcement investigations and operations targeting major drug traffickers in the hemisphere. They also adopted initiatives for increased enforcement and regulatory action to reduce the use of general aviation for trafficking purposes. The conference, hosted by the United States, provided a forum for the delegates to exchange information and build personal relationships that are key to enhancing closer coordination among law enforcement agencies.

Following extensive efforts by the Mexico City Country Office and others, the Mexican Supreme Court ruled that Mexican nationals could be extradited pursuant to the U.S.-Mexico Extradition Treaty. This decision, impacting no less than 17 outstanding appellate cases, resolves a perceived contradiction between the Mexican Penal Code and the extradition treaty on whether Mexican citizens had to stand trial in Mexico for crimes committed abroad or were subject to extradition only in exceptional cases. As of November 22, 2000, 38 persons in Mexican custody stood subject to extradition to the United States based on U.S. provisional arrest warrants and extradition requests.

The Nicosia, Cyprus, Country Office, through its interactions and excellent working relationship with its counterparts, played a part in raising support for the newly enacted money laundering prohibition law in Israel. The law prohibits holding, selling, receiving, transferring, and brokering property such as land or money in order to camouflage the source of the funds, or knowledge of the source. The law also obligates every person entering or exiting Israel to report amounts of more than $20,000.00.

After more than three years of discussion and negotiation by DEA Singapore, the Department of Justice, and the Department of State, the U.S. and Singapore governments signed a bilateral Drug Designation Agreement. The agreement facilitates the exchange of information on drug money laundering suspects and targets reciprocal honoring of asset forfeiture requests, and sharing of assets. Through DEA and Singapore law enforcement investigative efforts, approximately $20 million in drug trafficking proceeds have been identified and frozen in Singapore banks for seizure/forfeiture.

The Anti-Narcotics Force (ANF) SIU in Pakistan have seized 43 kilograms of white heroin, mostly at the airport. One seizure involved the arrest of 26 Nigerians, all identified as "swallowers," leading to the seizure of a total of 20 kilograms of white heroin. This is a fairly new trend in Pakistan and DEA in Pakistan is working closely with the ANF to identify and arrest future couriers. Another seizure, from an undercover operation, is a direct result of the specialized training ANF officers in the SIU receive.

The Tegucigalpa Country Office assisted Honduras in drafting chemical diversion legislation. Once approved, it will provide the Honduran law enforcement agencies with the authority to monitor the diversion of essential chemicals and prosecute businesses not following the regulations.

In January 2000, advocated by the DEA Manila Country Office, the Philippine President issued Executive Order No. 61, creating the National Drug Law Enforcement and Prevention Coordinating Center. The President views the Drug Center as the nucleus for the new Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency, to be established through legislation expected to pass later this year.

The Guatemala Country Office (GCO) has had an important role in providing liaison between the U.S. Mission, the Government of Guatemala, and the Division of Anti-Narcotics Operations (DOAN). The GCO has worked closely with the DOAN and government policy makers to push forth new agreements and legislation. The Guatemalan Congress approved a one-year blanket authorization for all U.S. Government military antinarcotics operations. Guatemala also signed three distinct Letters of Agreement with the U.S. Government on counternarcotics and demand reduction.

DEA Counternarcotics Training Statistics

Programs

Number of Participants

Number of Programs

Training in U.S.

-

-

"Vetted" Training

235

7

-

-

-

Training in Host Countries

-

-

In-Country Drug Enforcement Seminar

714

21

Advanced Drug Enforcement Seminar

163

4

Int'l Asset Forfeiture Seminar

173

6

Airport Operations

124

2

Specialized

54

2

ILEA

477

9

Total

1,940

51

DEA Summary of International Asset Forfeiture Sharing

(FY00)

Name of Case or Investigation

Total Amount Forfeited in the U.S.

Recipient Country

Amount of Transfer

Transfer Date

U.S. v. $1,814,807.93

Farina (D. Colorado) Case No. MK-96-0129

$1,814,807.93

Hong Kong (China)

$907,403.00

6/21/00

U.S. v. JULIO

(D. Oregon) Case No. RN-97-0030

$453,184.30

Switzerland

$226,447.88

7/24/00

U.S. v. Haddad

(D. of So. Texas)Case No. M5-98-0109

$101,830.24

Canada

$37,809.97

8/2/00

U.S. v. Esquivel Luz

(D. of So. Florida)Case No. GS-97-0005

$99,000.00

Ecuador

$14,850.00

8/22/00

United States Coast Guard

Overview

Campaign STEEL WEB is the Coast Guard's multiyear campaign plan to combat the dynamic maritime drug trafficking threat.

Strategic Concept: To deny drug smugglers access to non-commercial maritime routes by a sequence of coordinated operations placing interdiction forces in high threat areas of the Caribbean and eastern Pacific. STEEL WEB is fully aligned with Goal 4 (Shield America's air, land and sea frontiers from the drug threat) and Goal 5 (Break foreign and domestic drug sources of supply) of the National Drug Control Strategy (NDCS), and complements the contributions of our law enforcement (Customs, DEA, local LEAs) and DoD partners in this effort.

Systematic route denial: The employment of a "surge and maintain" strategy by combining a large number of surface and air assets in a "surge" force, focused on stopping the flow of drugs through a high-threat trafficking area. Once that flow is significantly reduced, the surge effort is reduced to a "maintenance" force of sufficient size to continue to deter traffickers from using those maritime routes. Surge forces are then focused on another high-threat trafficking area to deny drug smugglers the use of that route and so forth, thereby resulting in systematic route denial. Surge operations are repeated in a high-threat drug trafficking area as required if intelligence trends indicate a shift by drug smugglers back to that area.

STEEL WEB depends upon international combined maritime operations. Partnering with law enforcement officials of other nations helps develop indigenous interdiction forces, and enhances the cumulative impact of interdiction efforts directed at drug traffickers in the region. Combined operations with other nations' maritime forces also provide practical training for all participating personnel.

Combined Operations

Operation CARIBE VENTURE: International effort to deny smugglers the use of maritime routes along the islands of the eastern Caribbean. Participating nations are the US, France, Netherlands, United Kingdom, Trinidad and Tobago, Grenada, Barbados, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, St. Lucia, Dominica, St. Kitts and Nevis, Dominican Republic and Antigua/Barbuda. During 2000, two CARIBE VENTURE operations were conducted, each of approximately five months' duration.

Operation FRONTIER LANCE: A U.S./Haiti/Dominican Republic effort to deny smugglers the use of maritime routes into Hispaniola, which serves as the next step in the surge and maintain strategy of Campaign STEEL WEB. This effort remained in a maintenance phase throughout 2000.

Operation RIP TIDE: A combined U.S./Jamaica/Grand Caymans (UK) effort to deny smugglers the use of maritime smuggling routes into Jamaica and the Cayman Islands. RIP TIDE was conducted twice during 2000.

Operation CONJUNTOS: A U.S./Panama professional exchange and combined law enforcement effort in the territorial seas of Panama. Just one CONJUNTOS was conducted in 2000 (FEB 00); the remainder were cancelled because of the absence of a Visiting Forces Agreement (VFA) between Panama and the US.

Operation ALLIED STRENGTH: U.S./Belize combined operation conducted periodically pursuant to the US/BH counterdrug bilateral agreement. This operation was previously conducted in support of the combined CENTRAL SKIES interagency campaign (DEA, USCS, DOD) in Central America. One ALLIED STRENGTH was conducted early in 2000. Since then, Coast Guard has participated in several ad hoc operations with Belize to exercise the US/BH bilateral agreement.

Operation LIFESAVER: U.S./Honduras combined operation conducted in support of CENTRAL SKIES. Maritime counterdrug effort is supported by Maritime Patrol Aircraft (MPA) provided by JIATF East, and complements a US/HO combined effort employing the ground and air forces of JTF Bravo. Operation SEGURIDAD, a combined Coast Guard/Honduran Navy maritime counterdrug effort independent of CENTRAL SKIES, was also conducted in late 2000. Successful operations contributed to the Honduran government's ratification of the US/HO counterdrug bilateral agreement.

Operation MAYAN JAGUAR: U.S./Guatemala combined operation conducted in support of CENTRAL SKIES. One MAYAN JAGUAR operation was conducted in 2000.

Operation CHOKEHOLD: Combined operations with Costa Rica. The first CHOKEHOLD was conducted in early 2000, and lead to Costa Rica's first-ever maritime pollution case prosecution; since then, numerous other operations have been conducted with Costa Rica, pursuant to the new US/Costa Rica bilateral agreement.

Operation SCIMITAR: Combined operation with the Bahamas. This operation was conducted in the northern and central Bahamas, involving new Bahamian 60-meter patrol boats and Royal Bahamian Defense Force (RBDF) shipriders embarked in Coast Guard cutters.

Operation CUTLASS: Another combined operation with the Bahamas, concentrating effort on the southern Bahamas. This operation involved U.S. Navy Patrol-Coastals with CG LEDETs, as well as RBDF's Drug Enforcement Unit.

Operation Bahamas, Turks and Caicos (OPBAT): A Memorandum of Understanding with the UK, the Bahamas and Turks and Caicos to combat trafficking in the Turks and Caicos and the Bahamas. USCG contributes aircraft and aircrew on a steady-state basis. Also referred to as the TRIPART, the U.S. is a signatory to the MOU, signed in JUL 90. USCG does not provide law enforcement personnel to OPBAT. Law enforcement is carried out by Tripart Team Members (TTMs), who are either Bahamian or Turks and Caicos law enforcement authorities. The DEA provides LE officers, but they operate only to assist the TTMs and do not have law enforcement jurisdiction. In 2000, OPBAT forces, with Coast Guard support, seized 9,191 pounds of cocaine, 14,383 pounds of marijuana, arrested 84 persons and seized 14 vessels.

Coincidental Interaction with Mexico:

The Coast Guard conducts coincidental operations with the Mexican Navy in the Gulf of Mexico and the Eastern Pacific to assist the MXNAV in their counterdrug efforts. In 2000, Coast Guard provided direct support in 12 cases resulting in 11 MT of cocaine seized. Most significant of these were the F/V Valeria with 3 MT, and F/V Top Flight with 4.2 metric tons.

The US/Mexico Interdiction Working Group (IWG) is sponsored by the High Level Contact Group (HLCG) and grew from the bilateral cooperation experienced during maritime interdictions in 1999. The IWG is the newest HLCG working group and is based on a Mexico proposal accepted by HLCG in November 1999. USIC leads the U.S. side of JIATF-East, JIATF-West, Customs, CGD8, CGD11, DEA and the Narcotics Affairs Section (NAS) at the U.S. Embassy. Mexico representation includes FEADS (DEA equivalent), CENDRO-6 (national counterdrug unit), SRE (foreign ministry), PFP (Federal Preventative Police), DEFENSA (Army), MARINA (Navy) and SCT (Captain of the Port/Merchant Marine). The IWG has proven to be a tremendous asset in our efforts to enhance CD cooperation. The IWG has facilitated initiatives such as the US/MEX Communications Plan for use in law enforcement interdiction operations, and the Post Seizure Analysis Training/Exercise with the MEXNAV and the FEADS.

Interaction with Colombia:

The Coast Guard has enjoyed unprecedented cooperation in maritime interdiction this past year resulting in the seizure of over 27,000 pounds of cocaine in 2000. The U.S.-Colombia Shipboarding Agreement allows the U.S. to exercise jurisdiction over CO flagged vessels located outside the CO EEZ, if the U.S. has initiated an ongoing investigation. This has significantly aided U.S. prosecution of major drug trafficking organizations. The Colombians have authorized all 78 requests for USCG boardings of Colombian flagged vessels since October 1999. Recent successful cocaine seizures as a result of the Agreement include F/V REBELDE (12,000 lbs), F/V LEYNEYD (6,000 lbs), F/V DOUGLAS I (1,100 lbs), and two go-fast vessels (8,195 lbs).

Exercises and Training—Interaction with Foreign Governments:

TRADEWINDS 00 is an annual exercise conducted in two parts: a ground phase and a maritime phase. The maritime phase is conducted by the USCG and focuses on enhancing the participating nations' Coast Guard related missions / capabilities through use of symposia, engineering support and underway exercises in maritime law enforcement (MLE), search and rescue and marine environmental response/disaster containment. The maritime phase was conducted during two periods: the first period was hosted by Jamaica 26 Mar to 02 Apr. Others involved were Barbados, Belize, Dominican Republic, Haiti and Trinidad & Tobago. The second period was 06 to 13 Apr and involved St. Lucia as host country, Antigua & Barbuda, Barbados, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Netherlands Antilles, St Kitts/Nevis, St Vincent and the Grenadines, and the United Kingdom.

The U.S. Coast Guard provides basic and advanced training in its four core mission areas of Maritime Law Enforcement, Maritime Safety, Marine Environmental Protection and Defense Readiness. Specific skill sets include enforcement of laws and treaties (counternarcotics, fisheries, smuggling, alien interdiction); search and rescue; marine environmental response and protection; safety and security of marine transportation, ports, waterways and shore facilities; contingency and response planning; legal authority and jurisdiction; resource management to include budget formulation and workforce planning, training and retention; and national defense preparedness.

The training program development process begins by first assessing the state of the partner nation's maritime program, resources and the organization designated as the lead for this responsibility. A tailored, and possibly joint, training plan is then developed to meet the partner nation's program goals. Ultimately, in-country teams help the partner organization carry out the developed training plan to the point of established self-sufficiency. The team can assist a country in achieving national maritime goals in non-defense areas within the U.S. Coast Guard's area of expertise. Should the partner nation have a mission or issue that is covered by multiple U.S. agencies, which includes the U.S. Coast Guard, the team leader will assist in acquisition of personnel from other U.S. agencies. Mission areas addressed by previous Coast Guard and joint training teams include: evaluation of maritime law enforcement programs, development of model ports relative to narcotics intervention, creation of an implementation plan for a multi-mission, multi-agency maritime service management model, and development of training plans and institutions for multi-agency marine safety and maritime law enforcement programs.

The following charts show actual and projected training and assistance events for FY00 and FY01.

USCG Technical Assistance

FY00 (Completed)

Country

Course Title

Start Date

Finish Date

Funding Source

Antigua

Intro to Operational Management Mobile Training Team

31 Mar 00

14 Apr 00

Embassy

Antigua (RSSTU)

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

01 Oct 99

30 Sep 00

INL

Aruba

Counter Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

22 May 00

26 May 00

Direct

Aruba

Counter Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

29 May 00

02 Jun 00

Direct

Bangladesh

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 1

07 May 00

11 May 00

IMET

Belize

Port Security/ Port Vulnerability Mobile Training Team

18 Oct 99

22 Oct 99

INL

Benin

Engineering Logistics and Admin Mobile Training Team

06 Mar 00

17 Mar 00

IMET

Bolivia

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

01 Oct 99

30 Sep 00

Embassy

Colombia

Small Boat Operations Mobile Training Team

08 Nov 99

19 Nov 99

INL

Costa Rica

Port Security/ Port Vulnerability Mobile training team

05 Jun 00

17 Jun 00

Embassy

Croatia

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 2

11 Sep 00

15 Sep 00

IMET

Curacao

Counter Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

15 May 00

19 May 00

Direct

Ecuador

Counter Drug Training Support Mission

23 May 00

27 Jun 00

DOD`

Ecuador

Counter Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

28 Aug 00

01 Sep 00

IMET

Ecuador

Riverine Operations Support and Training

13 Feb 00

19 Feb 00

DOD`

Ecuador

Riverine Operations Support and Training

21 Apr 00

28 Apr 00

DOD`

Fiji

Maritime Needs Assessment

20 Mar 00

24 Mar 00

IMET

Fiji

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 1

20 Mar 00

24 Mar 00

IMET

Georgia

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

01 Oct 99

30 Sep 00

USCS

Greece

MLE Instructors Course Mobile Training Team

22 May 00

26 May 00

EUCOM

Grenada

Hull Maintenance (CST)

19 Jun 00

21 Jun 00

DOD

Haiti

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

01 Oct 99

30 Sep 00

IMET

Haiti

Small Boat Electronics Mobile Training Team

03 Jul 00

14 Jul 00

IMET

Jamaica

Container Inspection Mobile Training Team

26 Jun 00

29 Jun 00

Embassy

Jamaica

Deck Seamanship (CST)

29 May 00

30 May 00

DOD

Jamaica

Hull Maintenance (CST)

30 May 00

01 Jun 00

DOD

USCG Technical Assistance (Cont.)

FY00 (Completed)

Country

Course Title

Start Date

Finish Date

Funding Source

Jamaica

Outboard Motor Maintenance (CST)

29 May 00

30 May 00

DOD

Japan

Container Inspection Mobile Training Team

08 Nov 99

12 Nov 99

Japan

Counter Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

14 Feb 00

25 Feb 00

FMS

Japan

Counter Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

28 Aug 00

08 Sep 00

FMS

Japan

Maritime Law Enforcement, VBSS

14 Jul 00

20 Jul 00

FMS

Kenya

Boarding Officer, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

11 Oct 99

22 Oct 99

IMET

Kenya

Counter Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

11 Oct 99

15 Oct 99

IMET

Kenya

MLE Instructors Course Mobile Training Team

18 Oct 99

22 Oct 99

IMET

Macedonia

Hull Maintenance Mobile Training Team

11 Sep 00

15 Sep 00

IMET

Macedonia

Outboard Motor Maintenance Mobile Training Team

04 Sep 00

08 Sep 00

IMET

Madagascar

Counter Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

25 Oct 99

29 Oct 99

IMET

Nicaragua

Counter Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

06 Dec 99

17 Dec 99

IMET

Nicaragua

MLE Interdiction Planning Mobile Training Team

19 Jun 00

23 Jun 00

IMET

Pakistan

Counter Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

17 Jul 00

21 Jul 00

INL

Pakistan

Maritime Law Enforcement Counter Narcotics - Conference and Assessment

02 Jun 00

10 Jun 00

DOD

Panama

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

01 Oct 99

30 Sep 00

Embassy

Papua New Guinea

Outboard Motor Maintenance Mobile Training Team

03 May 00

07 May 00

IMET

Peru

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

01 Oct 99

30 Sep 00

DOD

Philippines

Joint Counter narcotics Course, Mobile Training Team

10 APR 00

14 Apr 00

USAID

Philippines

MLE Instructors Course Mobile Training Team

03 Apr 00

07 Apr 00

USAID

Philippines

MLE Interdiction Planning Mobile Training Team

27 Mar 00

31 Mar 00

USAID

Romania

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 2

20 Dec 99

24 Dec 99

IMET

Seychelles

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 1

09 Jun 00

16 Jun 00

IMET

Solomon Island

Outboard Motor Maintenance Mobile Training Team

10 May 00

14 May 00

IMET

St Maarten

Counter Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

25 Apr 00

28 Apr 00

Direct

USCG Technical Assistance (Cont.)

FY00 (Completed)

Country

Course Title

Start Date

Finish Date

Funding Source

St Vincent

Deck Seamanship (CST)

19 Jun 00

19 Jun 99

DOD

St Vincent

Navigation (CST)

20 Jun 00

20 Jun 00

DOD

Suriname

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 2

13 Dec 99

17 Dec 99

IMET

Thailand

Counter Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

07 Mar 00

17 Mar 00

Embassy

Trinidad & Tobago

Deck Seamanship (CST)

27 Jun 00

27Jun 00

DOD

Trinidad & Tobago

MLE Boarding Officer (CST)

23 Jun 00

28 Jun 00

DOD

Trinidad & Tobago

Port Security/ Port Vulnerability Mobile Training Team

11 Oct 99

15 Oct 99

INL

Tunisia

MLE Instructors Course Mobile Training Team

08 May 00

12 May 00

IMET

Vanuatu

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 1

14 Aug 00

18 Aug 00

IMET

Yemen

Maritime Needs Assessment

29 Jun 00

07 Jul 00

FMS

USCG Technical Assistance

FY01 (Proposed)

Country

Course Title

Funding

Albania

Instructor Course, Counter-Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

Antigua and Barbuda

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

INL

Aruba

Instructor Course, Counter-Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

FMS

Bahamas

Boarding Officer, Advanced, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

Bahamas

Interdiction Planning, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

Benin

Outboard Motor Maintenance, Advanced Mobile Training Team

IMET

Bolivia

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

Embassy

Bulgaria

Advanced Boarding Officer Course, MLE

INL

China

Interdiction Planning, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

INL

China

Port Physical Security / Port Vulnerability Assessment Basic Mobile Training Team

INL

China

Small Boat Operations Mobile Training Team

INL

Colombia

Boarding Officer, Counter-Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

INL

Colombia

Curriculum Infusion Program, Counter-Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

Colombia

Instructor Course, Counter-Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

Colombia

Port Physical Security / Port Vulnerability Assessment Advanced Mobile Training Team

FMS

Costa Rica

Boarding Officer, Counter-Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

INL

Costa Rica

Interdiction Planning, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

INL

Costa Rica

Small Boat Operational Training Program Development Mobile Training Team

IMET

Costa Rica

Small Boat Operations, CG-11

INL

Croatia

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 3 - Development

IMET

Curacao

Instructor Course, Counter-Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

FMS

El Salvador

Boarding Officer, Counter-Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

El Salvador

Interdiction Planning, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

Georgia

Engineering/Logistics Administration Mobile Training Team

USCS

Greece

Boarding Officer, Advanced, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

Direct

USCG Technical Assistance (Cont.)

FY01 (Proposed)

Country

Course Title

Funding

Haiti

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team LTT

IMET

Honduras

Small Boat Operations Mobile Training Team

INL

Indonesia

Joint Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

IMET

Indonesia

Joint Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

IMET

Jamaica

Boarding Officer, Counter-Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

Jamaica

Instructor Course, Counter-Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

Jamaica

Interdiction Planning, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

Latvia

Boarding Officer, Counter-Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

DOS

Latvia

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 2 - Planning

INL

Lebanon

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 1 - Assessment

INL

Lebanon

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 2 - Planning

INL

Lebanon

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 3 - Development

INL

Mozambique

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 1 - Assessment

IMET

Mozambique

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 2 - Planning

IMET

Namibia

Boarding Officer - Fisheries

IMET

Namibia

MLE Pre Training Survey

IMET

Nicaragua

Boarding Officer, Advanced, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

Nicaragua

Interdiction Planning, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

Pakistan

Boarding Officer, Advanced, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

INL

Panama

Joint Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

INL

Panama

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

Embassy

Panama

Small Boat Operations Mobile Training Team

INL

Portugal

Boarding Officer, Advanced, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

Portugal

MLE Pre Training Survey

IMET

Russia

Instructors Course, MLE CG-03

INL

Russia

Miscellaneous Mobile Training Team Out-CONUS

IMET

Samoa

Leadership and Management

IMET

USCG Technical Assistance (Cont.)

FY01 (Proposed)

Country

Course Title

Funding

Solomon Islands

Small Boat Operations Mobile Training Team

IMET

Suriname

Boarding Officer, Counter-Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

Suriname

Interdiction Planning, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

Suriname

Introduction to Operational Information Management MTT

IMET

Suriname

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 4 - Implementation

IMET

Suriname

Small Boat Operations Mobile Training Team

IMET

Thailand

Instructors Course, MLE CG-03

INL

Tunisia

Instructor Course, Counter-Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

Uzbekistan

Boarding Officer, Advanced, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

INL

Uzbekistan

Boarding Officer, Counter-Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

INL

Vanuatu

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 3 - Development

IMET

Yemen

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

FMS

Yemen (Sanaa)

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

FMS

Zambia

Boarding Officer, Counter-Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

Embassy

Zambia

MLE Pre Training Survey

IMET

Zimbabwe

MLE Pre Training Survey

IMET

USCG Vessel Transfer

Excess Defense Articles Program

Vessel Description

FY00

FY01 (Planned/Proposed)

82-Foot Patrol Boat

Jamaica (2)

Colombia (3)

-

Panama (1)

Trinidad & Tobago (2)

-

Philippines (1)

Dominican Republic (1)

-

Costa Rica (1)

Panama(1)

-

Georgia (1)

Philippines (1)

-

Argentina (1)

Costa Rica (1)

-

Colombia (1)

El Salvador (1)

-

Turkmenistan (1)

-

180-Foot Buoy Tender

-

Dominican Republic (1)

- -

Ghana (1)

44-Foot Motor Life Boat

Seychelles (4)

Tunisia (8)

-

Honduras (4)

El Salvador (4)

- -

Chile (5)

- -

Guyana (4)

- -

Madagascar (6)

United States Customs Service

Since 1973, the U.S. Customs Service has provided a comprehensive program of international counter narcotics training and assistance to foreign customs and other border control agencies. Individual training and assistance programs are tailored to meet the needs of the recipient country but usually focus on one or more of the following subject areas: narcotics interdiction at air/sea/land ports of entry; financial investigations; training development; and management of special enforcement teams.

Counter Narcotics Training and Assistance

In 2000, U.S. Customs conducted a total of 246 international counternarcotics programs involving 2280 participants from over 89 countries. Programs conducted outside the U.S. included 13 Overseas Enforcement Training (OET) Programs for individual countries; one Regional Overseas Enforcement Training (ROET) Program for two or more countries; five Train-the-Trainer Workshops (T3W) for an individual country; six Short Term Advisory (STA) programs; four Contraband Enforcement Team (CET) programs; five Integrity/Anti-Corruption Programs; one Intelligence program; one Asset Forfeiture Seminar; and ten Industry Partnership Program (IPP) seminars.

In addition to the normal schedule of international counternarcotics training and assistance conducted under the auspices of INL, U.S. Customs carried out a number of counternarcotics projects in response to high priority concerns during 2000. Among these are the following:

  • U.S. Customs provided technical training and assistance in support of the International Law Enforcement Academy (ILEA) programs currently operating in Budapest and Bangkok. U.S. Customs has developed and conducted specialized training on topics which include: International Controlled Deliveries and Drug Investigation conducted jointly with DEA; Complex Financial Investigations, conducted jointly with IRS; and Intellectual Property Rights, conducted with the FBI.

  • U.S. Customs developed and implemented a Colombian training and assistance initiative, focusing on narcotics interdiction efforts, combating the Black Market Peso Exchange, gathering of intelligence, and bilateral cooperative efforts between the government of the U.S. and Colombia. In support of Plan Colombia, U.S. Customs will provide training and assistance focusing on integrity, border interdiction, trade fraud, intelligence collection, industry partnership programs, and financial crimes issues in Colombia. In addition, an Andean Regional Initiative has been developed to counter the effects of Plan Colombia in the Andean Region.

  • The Nigeria Inter-Agency Working Group was established to provide support and assistance to the democratic process, infrastructure improvements, and economic development in Nigeria. Over the past two years, U.S. Customs has participated in several multi-agency assessments, including a January 2000 INL-funded Special Airport Narcotics Interdiction Course in Lagos, which will focus on the targeting and search of passengers, cargo and aircraft, and smuggling investigations. In addition, funding was provided by INL for a Contraband Enforcement Team Training Program that took place in October 2000.

  • The Safe Skies for Africa Initiative is intended to promote sustainable improvements in aviation safety and security in Africa and to create the environment necessary to foster the growth of aviation services between Africa and the United States. The initiative recognizes that Safe Skies are a prerequisite for increased trade and investment and long-term economic development in Africa. In support of this initiative, the U.S. Government periodically sends multi-agency teams to conduct surveys of the aviation needs of the selected countries and will assist them in developing work plans to improve and enhance their aviation infrastructure. These countries are then encouraged to work with international organizations and the private sector to implement these plans. U.S. survey teams, which include one U.S. Customs Inspector, visited Kenya in March 1999, Cote d'Ivoire in July 1999, and Tanzania in November 1999. The Safe Skies team re-visited Kenya in April 2000, Cape Verde in May 2000, Namibia/Cameroon June 2000 and Mali in August 2000.

  • A U.S. Customs canine expert traveled to Colombia during March 2000 to conduct a Post-funded canine program assessment. In addition, under Hurricane Mitch Supplemental funding six Honduran canine officers participated in canine training programs at the U.S. Customs Canine Training Center located in Front Royal, Virginia.

  • Post-funded Short-Term Advisory projects were conducted in Venezuela in February and November 2000.

Industry Partnership Programs

Carrier Initiative Program (CIP) and Business Anti-Smuggling Coalition (BASC) training are conducted for U.S. Customs' industry partners. The Carrier Initiative Program provides counternarcotics and security training to air, sea and land commercial transport companies (carriers) and emphasizes public-private partnerships in which U.S. Customs and the carrier companies cooperate to prevent commercial conveyances from being utilized to smuggle narcotics.

The Business Anti-Smuggling Coalition (BASC) is a business-led, U.S. Customs-supported alliance created to combat narcotic smuggling via commercial trade. As a voluntary program for businesses, with no Government-imposed mandates, corporate participants are expected to set self-imposed business standards that will significantly deter narcotics traffickers. The BASC program examines the entire process of manufacturing and shipping of merchandise from foreign countries to the United States, emphasizing the creation of a more security-conscious environment at foreign manufacturing plants to eliminate, or at least reduce, product vulnerability to narcotics smuggling. By examining packing and shipping practices and identifying and correcting deficiencies along the spectrum of the import process, businesses can reduce their exposure to the likelihood that their shipments will be used as narcotics smuggling vehicles.

The FY 1999 funding cycle was the ninth year in which INL funded Customs' international training for the Carrier Initiative Program, and the third in which INL funding was provided for the BASC. INL funds were used to present CIP and BASC training to 744 employees in 10 foreign training seminars. Most of the FY 1999 funded programs were presented during FY 2000. These seminars and site surveys were offered in the following countries: Aruba, Colombia, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guyana, Jamaica, Mexico, Peru, and Nigeria. Costs relating to these programs are partially offset by the sponsoring commercial transportation companies.

At present, over 4,100 carriers operating in the maritime, trucking, rail, and air environments participate in the Carrier Initiative Program. Over 200 foreign manufacturers and exporters have begun participation in the BASC since its inception in 1996. In FY 2000, Customs Industry Partners effected over 200 foreign interceptions of illegal drugs, with a total weight of over 44,000 pounds. They also provided information and assistance leading to over 80 drug seizures at the U.S. border, with a weight in excess of 36,000 pounds. In total, CIP and BASC participants contributed to 280 interceptions and seizures, preventing over 80,000 pounds of illegal drugs from entering the United States.

U.S. Customs and the Mattel Corporation, one of private industry's first proponents of the Business Anti-Smuggling Coalition (BASC), addressed the 10th Working Group meeting of the World Customs Organization's (WCO) Alliance of Customs and Trade for the Interdiction of Narcotics (ACTION/DEFIS). Discussed were the development of the BASC program, reasons why industry desired such a program, and the benefits enjoyed by Customs and industry as a result of the program. It was announced that the International Chamber of Commerce has endorsed BASC and hopes to work with the WCO in expanding BASC around the world.

The Americas Counter Smuggling Initiative (ACSI) is a priority undertaking established by U.S. Customs to build upon the success of the CIP and BASC, by strengthening and expanding our antinarcotics security programs throughout Central and South America. Under the auspices of ACSI, U.S. Customs officials are being detailed to select Central and South American countries to assist businesses and host governments in developing security programs and initiatives to safeguard legitimate shipments from being used to smuggle narcotics. A parallel track of the ACSI includes the training of counterpart customs administrations and other appropriate foreign government antidrug forces. During 1999, U.S. Customs successfully introduced ACSI to the governments and trade and transportation entities in the seven targeted countries (Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, Peru and Venezuela).

Results

Particularly noteworthy in assessing U.S. Customs international counternarcotics training and assistance during 2000 are the following reports on the results of the training efforts in terms of narcotics seizures, improvement in the organization of counternarcotics law enforcement, and increased public awareness:

  • In a cable dated April 4, 2000, the U.S. Embassy in San Salvador attributes the seizure of 4.7 kilograms of cocaine and arrests of two subjects to U.S. Customs training efforts. On March 16th Division of Anti-Narcotics (DAN) agents assigned to a mobile inspection team established a vehicle checkpoint near the El Amatillo Border Crossing. During the operation, DAN agents inspected a local bus courier that operates within the boundaries of El Salvador and Honduras. DAN agents conducted interviews of the passengers that resulted in two females being escorted to the DAN office. A female DAN agent conducted a patdown search that revealed two brick size packages beneath the clothing of each suspect. Each brick package contained a white powdery substance that tested positive for cocaine. The San Salvador country office noted that members of the mobile inspection team, including the female agent, had just returned from a one-week training seminar presented by the U.S. Customs Service in El Paso, Texas.

  • In a cable dated April 28, 2000, the U.S. Embassy in Quito attributes the seizure of 76.6 kilograms of cocaine to U.S. Customs training efforts. During April 5-15, 2000, NAS/Ecuador and U.S. Customs held an Overseas Enforcement Training Program in Guayaquil for 28 Ecuadorian National Police (ENP) personnel. The training focused on containerized cargo inspection techniques and included practical inspection exercises at the Guayaquil Seaport. Barely two weeks after the training the ENP canine unit in Guayaquil made a major seizure of cocaine hidden in a container of artificial pumice bound for the Port of Miami. The seizure demonstrated the ENP's more aggressive law enforcement in the port and the mastery of new skills learned including improved searching techniques and quicker follow-up of investigative leads.

Customs Mutual Assistance Agreements

In 2000, the United States Government signed Customs Mutual Assistance Agreements (CMAAs) with the Governments of Bulgaria, Philippines, Mexico and South Africa and pending signatures with Brazil and Malta. The United States Government signed a CMAA with the Government of Mexico in 1976. However, the respective Customs administrations agreed to pursue a new CMAA which now, among other things, improves conformity to current operational practices unique to the countries' shared border status. The new U.S./Mexico CMAA also takes into account issues of both the U.S. Departments of State and Justice and provides U.S. Customs with an updated legal framework with which to enforce customs laws and exchange information.

CMAA negotiations are currently on-going with the Governments of Chile, Kuwait and Paraguay. CMAAs provide for mutual assistance in the enforcement of customs-related laws, and U.S. Customs utilizes these agreements to assist in evidence collection for criminal cases involving narcotics smuggling and money laundering. U.S. courts have ruled that evidenced gathered via these executive agreements is fully admissible in U.S. court cases.

Shared Financial Assets

In FY 2000, U.S. Customs shared financial assets with five countries:

Cayman Islands

$2,680,803

Switzerland

$431,543

Netherlands

$1,717,743

England

$719,743

Canada

$241,446

Total

$5,791,278

U.S. Customs Counternarcotics Training Statistics

Programs

Number of Participants

Number of Programs

- - -

Training in the U.S.

- -

International Visitors Program

701

193

- - -

Training in Host Countries

- -

Overseas Enforcement Training

381

13

Regional Overseas Enforcement Training

22

1

Train-the-Trainer Workshop

74

5

Short Term Advisory

30

6

Contraband Enforcement Team

108

4

Integrity/Anti-Corruption

114

5

Intelligence Training

45

1

Outbound Currency Interdiction Seminar

30

2

Assessments

-

3

Canine Training (U.S. Based)

6

2

Asset Forfeiture Seminar

25

1

U.S. Customs Counternarcotics Training Statistics (Cont.)

Programs

Number of Participants

Number of Programs

Carrier Initiative Program Seminars/Business Anti-Smuggling Coalition

744

10

Total

2280

246

[End.]

[This is a mobile copy of U.S. Government Assistance]