Patterns of Global Terrorism
Office of the Coordinator for Counterterrorism
June 22, 2004
Report

Link for previously released Appendix A

Note: The U.S. Government's Incident Review Panel has determined that the following incidents meet the criteria for significant international terrorist incidents. An International Incident is judged significant if it results in loss of life or serious injury to persons, major property damage (more than $10,000), and/or is an act or attempt that could reasonably be expected to create the conditions noted.

January

5 Israel
On 5 January 2003, in Tel Aviv, Israel, two suicide bombers attacked simultaneously, according to media reports. Victims included 23 killed (15 Israelis, two Romanian citizens, one citizen from Ghana, one Bulgarian citizen, three Chinese citizens, and one Ukrainian citizen) and 107 wounded (nationalities not specified). The attack took place in the vicinity of the old central bus station, where foreign national workers live. The detonations took place within seconds of each other and were approximately 600 feet apart—one in a pedestrian mall and one in front of a bus stop. The al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigade is considered responsible.

5 Pakistan
On 5 January 2003, in Peshawar, Pakistan, two gunmen fired on the residence of an Afghan diplomat, injuring a guard, according to press reports. The diplomat was not in residence at the time of the incident. No one claimed responsibility.

5 India
On 5 January 2003, in Kulgam, Kashmir, India, a grenade exploded at a bus station, wounding 40 (36 private citizens and four security personnel), according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

14 Panama
On 14 January 2003, in Darien, Panama, rebels kidnapped three U.S. citizens, including a reporter, and released them ten days later, according to press reports. Media reports state the United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia are probably responsible.

17 West Bank
On 17 January 2003, in Givat Harina, West Bank, two gunmen killed one person and wounded three others, all Israelis, according to press reports. The Islamic Resistance Movement (HAMAS) claimed responsibility.

21 Kuwait
On 21 January 2003, in Kuwait City, Kuwait, a gunman ambushed a vehicle at an intersection where the car had halted for a stoplight. Victims included one U.S. citizen killed and one U.S. citizen wounded, according to media reports. The victims were civilian contractors working for the U.S. military. The incident took place close to Camp Doha, an installation housing approximately 17,000 U.S. troops.

On 23/24 January 2003, a Kuwaiti was apprehended attempting to cross the border from Kuwait to Saudi Arabia. The 20-year-old Kuwaiti civil servant, Sami al-Mutayri, confessed to the 21 January attack and stated that he embraces al-Qaida ideology and implements Osama Bin Ladin's instructions, although there is no evidence of an organizational link. The assailant acted alone but had assistance in planning the ambush. No group claimed responsibility.

21 Colombia
On 21 January 2003, in Tame, Colombia, rebels kidnapped two journalists working for the Los Angeles Times newspaper. One was a British reporter and the other a U.S. photographer. The National Liberation Army (ELN) is considered responsible. On 1 February 2003, the two journalists were released unharmed.

27 Afghanistan
On 27 January 2003, in Nangarhar, Afghanistan, armed militants attacked a convoy, killing two security officers escorting several United Nations vehicles, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

31 India
On 31 January 2003, in Srinagar, Kashmir, India, armed militants shot and killed a local journalist in his office, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

February

5 Saudi Arabia
On 5 February 2003 in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, three gunmen fired five shots at the vehicle of a United Kingdom citizen as he was traveling from work to home, according to television reports. The victim, a British Airways employee, received only superficial wounds from broken glass. No one claimed responsibility.

7 Saudi Arabia
On 7 February 2003, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, eight gunmen fired on police, killing one Kuwaiti and wounding three others, including two policemen.

13 Colombia
On 13 February 2003, in Colombia, five crew members (four U.S. citizen-U.S. Government defense contractors and one Columbian citizen) survived an airplane crash, although two were injured. They were subsequently captured by militants. A Colombian service member and a U.S. citizen were later shot and killed by the militants, according to press reports. The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) claim they are holding captive the three missing U.S. persons. As of 18 June 2004, the three were still being held by the FARC.

20 India
On 20 February 2003, in Varmul, Kashmir, India, a landmine planted near a busy marketplace exploded, killing six and wounding three, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

20 Saudi Arabia
On 20 February 2003 in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, a gunman ambushed a car at a stoplight, killing one�a United Kingdom citizen employed by British Aerospace Engineering (BAE), according to press reports. The gunman, arrested by Saudi police, is a Yemen-born naturalized Saudi. No group claimed responsibility.

20 Algeria
On 20 February 2003, the Swiss Embassy in Algeria reported four Swiss citizens were missing while touring the Sahara Desert in a small group without a guide, according to press reports. The tourists were later confirmed kidnapped by the Salafist Group for Call and Combat (GSPC).

From mid-February to mid-May, there were eight separate incidents of the kidnapping of European tourists by the GSPC. The 32 hostages from the various incidents were later intermingled. Algerian Special Forces rescued 17 hostages on 13 May 2003. One hostage, a German woman, died 28 July of heatstroke while in captivity. On 18 August, the remaining 14 hostages were released in northern Mali. Press reports claimed a ransom of 4.6 million euros was paid to the GSPC in return for the hostages' freedom.

22 Algeria
On 22 February 2003, the German Embassy in Algeria reported four German citizens were missing while touring the Sahara desert in a small group without a guide, according to press reports. The tourists were later confirmed kidnapped by terrorist members of the Salafist Group for Call and Combat (GSPC).

From mid-February to mid-May, there were eight separate incidents of the kidnapping of European tourists by the GSPC. The 32 hostages from the various incidents were later intermingled. Algerian Special Forces rescued 17 hostages on 13 May 2003. One hostage, a German woman, died 28 July of heatstroke while in captivity. On 18 August, the remaining 14 hostages were released in northern Mali. Press reports claimed a ransom of 4.6 million euros was paid to the GSPC in return for the hostages' freedom

25 Venezuela
On 25 February 2003, in Caracas, Venezuela, two bombs exploded within minutes of each other, wounding four (one Colombian and three Venezuelans). The blasts also damaged the Spanish and Colombian Embassies and other buildings nearby. No one claimed responsibility.

25 Saudi Arabia
On 25 February 2003, in al-Dammam, Saudi Arabia, an incendiary bomb was thrown at a McDonald's restaurant, according to press reports. Two people in a car approached the business, and the passenger got out and hurled the canister. When the bomb failed to explode, the perpetrator unsuccessfully attempted to ignite the device, and then fled in the vehicle. Employees called authorities, and after an investigation, police arrested a person whose clothes contained the same substance as that found in the bomb. The suspect was later identified by witnesses. No group claimed responsibility.

March

2 Venezuela
On 2 March 2003, in Maracaibo, Venezuela, at around 5:00 AM, a car bomb exploded. The blast damaged surrounding buildings, including a local office of the U.S. oil company Chevron Texaco, according to press reports. The car bomb was composed of explosives similar to the substance used in the bombings at the Spanish and Colombian Embassies the previous week. The explosion occurred directly outside the home of controversial cattle livestock producer, Antonio Melian. Mr. Melian is a leading activist in Zulia State, and he has been the center of opposition-government debate following the two-month nationwide labor-management work stoppage, which failed in its aim to bring down the Chavez Frias government. No one claimed responsibility.

4 Philippines
On 4 March 2003, in Davao, Philippines, a bomb hidden in a backpack exploded in a crowded airline terminal, killing 21 (one U.S. citizen) and wounding 149 (including three U.S. citizens), according to press reports.

5 Israel
On 5 March 2003, in Haifa, Israel, a suicide bomber detonated an explosive device aboard a bus on Moriya Boulevard in the Karmel neighborhood. Victims included 15 killed (including one U.S. citizen) and 40 wounded, according to media reports. The Islamic Resistance Movement (HAMAS) claimed responsibility.

7 West Bank
On 7 March 2003, in Qiryat Arba, West Bank, two gunmen disguised as Orthodox Jewish students infiltrated and attacked the settlement, killing three (two U.S. citizens) and wounding eight, according to media reports. The Islamic Resistance Movement (HAMAS) claimed responsibility.

9 India
On 9 March 2003, in Doda District, Kashmir, India, armed militants kidnapped and killed a private citizen, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

11 India
On 11 March 2003, in Rajouri, Kashmir, India, a bomb exploded in a candy store, killing two and wounding nine, according to press reports. No group has claimed responsibility.

13 India
On 13 March 2003, in Rajouri, Kashmir, India, at 11:10 AM a bomb exploded on a bus parked at a terminal, killing four, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

16 India
On 16 March 2003, in Indh, Kashmir, India, armed militants attacked a police installation, killing 11 (nine police officers and two civilians) and wounding nine (eight police officers and one civilian), according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

20 Lebanon
On 20 March 2003, in Sidon, Lebanon, an explosive device consisting of approximately 2 kilograms of TNT exploded, killing two persons and wounding nine others. The bomb was placed on the first floor stairs of an apartment building where the likely target, a Dutch woman, lived with her Lebanese husband. Three apartments were damaged and a number of cars set ablaze from the explosion. No one claimed responsibility.

22 Greece
On 22 March 2003, in Koropi, Greece, a makeshift incendiary device exploded in an ATM outside a Citibank branch. The explosion and subsequent fire caused severe damage to the ATM. No one claimed responsibility.

22 Iraq
On 22 March 2003, in Sayed Sadiq, Iraq, a taxi raced up alongside an Australian journalist and exploded, killing one (an Australian journalist/cameraman) and wounding ten (an Australian on assignment for Australian Broadcasting Corporation and nine others). Ansar al-Islam is believed to be responsible.

24 India
On 24 March 2003, in Nadi Marg, Kashmir, India, armed militants dressed in military uniforms entered and attacked a village. Victims included 11 men, 11 women, and two small boys who were lined up and shot and killed by the gunmen, according to press reports. No group claimed responsibility.

25 Italy
From 25-26 March 2003, in Vicenza, Italy, extremists firebombed three cars belonging to U.S. service members. The Anti-Imperialist Territorial Nuclei, an extremist group believed to be close to the new Red Brigades, has claimed responsibility for the attacks.

25 Serbia
On 25 March 2003, in Pristina, Serbia, four bomb attacks were carried out on the same day against the UN Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK) police stations. UNMIK police suspect the founder and commander of a local mujahidin unit was responsible for this attack.

26 India
On 26 March 2003, in Narwal, Kashmir, India, a bomb placed inside the engine of an empty oil tanker parked outside a fuel storage area exploded and caught fire, killing one and wounding six, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

26 Chile
On 26 March 2003, around 11:00 PM, in Santiago, Chile, anti-war protesters exploded a small bomb at a branch of the U.S.-based BancBoston. The bomb smashed windows, destroyed an ATM, and caused minor damage to two adjacent stores. No one has claimed responsibility for the attack.

28 Afghanistan
On 28 March 2003, in Tirin Kot, Afghanistan, armed militants shot and killed a Salvadoran Red Cross worker, according to press reports. The victim was traveling with Afghan colleagues to check on water supplies when his group was captured. The leader of the militants was instructed via telephone to kill the only Westerner in the captured group. No one claimed responsibility.

28 Italy
On the night of 28 March 2003, in Rome, Italy, extremists firebombed a Ford and Jaguar dealership, two brands taken as symbols of the Anglo-American coalition that is fighting in Iraq. Approximately a dozen Fords were burned and another ten damaged. A five-pointed star, a symbol of the Red Brigades, was found at the site; however, the Red Brigades are not known to plan firebomb attacks. No one claimed responsibility.

29 Greece
On 29 March 2003, in Athens, Greece, at approximately 1:20 AM, an unknown assailant threw a hand grenade at a McDonald's restaurant, causing significant property damage. No one claimed responsibility.

30 India
On 30 March 2003, in Poonch, Kashmir, India, a bomb exploded in a field during a cricket match, killing one and wounding two, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

31 Cuba
On 31 March 2003, in Havana, Cuba, a man armed with two grenades hijacked a domestic airliner with 46 passengers and crew aboard in an attempt to reach the United States. After making an emergency landing in Havana airport due to insufficient fuel, the plane was kept all night on the runway of Havana airport.

On the next day, 1 April 2003, more than 20 passengers left the aircraft, apparently unharmed. With at least 25 passengers on board, the hijacked plane then departed Havana airport and safely landed in Key West, Florida.

April

2 Philippines
On 2 April 2003, in Davao, Philippines, a bomb exploded on a crowded passenger wharf. There were 16 killed and 55 wounded, according to press reports. This attack is believed to have been carried out by two Indonesian members of Jemaah Islamiyah, a regional terrorist group with links to al-Qaida. Two individuals were later arrested for this attack. Ismael Acmad, also known as Toto, was identified as the alleged planner. Tahome Urong, also known as Sermin Tohami, was identified as an alleged accomplice. They reportedly belong to the Special Operations Group of the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF). The two men told investigators they also were involved in the Davao Airport bombing and were given funds to carry out these attacks by Jemaah Islamiyah.

The ammonium nitrate explosive used in the wharf attack is similar to that purchased by a Jemaah Islamiyah operative, Fathur Rohman Ghozi, and seized by police in January 2002 shortly after Ghozi's arrest by Philippine police. Several Indonesian members of Jemaah Islamiyah have been spotted in terrorist training camps on the southern island of Mindanao.

3 Turkey
On 3 April 2003, at around 12:50 AM, in Istanbul, Turkey, a bomb went off near the British Consulate General. The blast caused considerable damage to the Consulate and blew out windows of an adjacent hotel, leaving one Turkish hotel guest with minor cuts.

Turkish police believe the bomb was a resonant device (sound bomb) of relatively crude construction. The terrorist group MLK-P (Marxist-Leninist Communist Party) is suspected to be responsible, although no one has claimed responsibility for the attack.

3 Algeria
On 3 April 2003, in the Sahara Desert, Algeria, eight Austrian tourists were kidnapped by terrorists while traveling in that region, according to press reports. The Salafist Group for Call and Combat (GSPC) is considered responsible for the abduction.

From mid-February to mid-May, there were eight separate incidents of the kidnapping of European tourists by the GSPC. The 32 hostages from the various incidents were later intermingled. Algerian Special Forces rescued 17 hostages on 13 May 2003. One hostage, a German woman, died 28 July of heatstroke while in captivity. On 18 August, the remaining 14 hostages were released in northern Mali. Press reports claimed a ransom of 4.6 million euros was paid to the GSPC in return for the hostages' freedom.

4 Algeria
During the week of 4 April 2003, in the Sahara Desert, Algeria, terrorists kidnapped 11 German tourists traveling in small groups without guides, bringing the total number of Germans abducted (up to this point) to 15. The Salafist Group for Call and Combat (GSPC) is considered responsible.

From mid-February to mid-May, there were eight separate incidents of the kidnapping of European tourists by the GSPC. The 32 hostages from the various incidents were later intermingled. Algerian Special Forces rescued 17 hostages on 13 May 2003. One hostage, a German woman, died 28 July of heatstroke while in captivity. On 18 August, the remaining 14 hostages were released in northern Mali. Press reports claimed a ransom of 4.6 million euros was paid to the GSPC in return for the hostages' freedom.

5 Lebanon
On 5 April 2003, in Dowra, Lebanon, at 4:40 PM, 500 grams of TNT placed in the men's room trash receptacle of a McDonald's restaurant exploded, according to media and U.S. Embassy reports. Victims included ten wounded. The restaurant also sustained considerable damage. Five to ten seconds later a minor explosion took place in a vehicle adjacent to the building. The explosion was a partial detonation of a three-stage improvised explosive device (IED) that consisted of three timers, 50 kilograms of TNT, an unidentified quantity of C-4, and three gas-filled containers. No one claimed responsibility.

8 Jordan
On 8 April 2003, in Amman, Jordan, at 10:45 PM, three militants fired a shot at a U.S. official outside his hotel, when he stepped out to make a call, according to press reports. The sole victim was lightly wounded. No one claimed responsibility.

8 Algeria
On 8 April 2003, in the Sahara Desert, Algeria, one Swede and one Dutch citizen were kidnapped, according to press reports. The Salafist Group for Call and Combat (GSPC) is considered responsible for kidnapping the two tourists.

From mid-February to mid-May, there were eight separate incidents of the kidnapping of European tourists by the GSPC. The 32 hostages from the various incidents were later intermingled. Algerian Special Forces rescued 17 hostages on 13 May 2003. One hostage, a German woman, died 28 July of heatstroke while in captivity. On 18 August, the remaining 14 hostages were released in northern Mali. Press reports claimed a ransom of 4.6 million euros was paid to the GSPC in return for the hostages' freedom.

11 Algeria
On 11 April 2003, the Austrian Foreign Ministry reported two mountaineers disappeared while in the Sahara Desert, Algeria, bringing the total number of Austrian tourists recently abducted in that area to ten, according to press reports. The Salafist Group for Call and Combat (GSPC) is considered responsible for kidnapping the two tourists.

From mid-February to mid-May, there were eight separate incidents of the kidnapping of European tourists by the GSPC. The 32 hostages from the various incidents were later intermingled. Algerian Special Forces rescued 17 hostages on 13 May 2003. One hostage, a German woman, died 28 July of heatstroke while in captivity. On 18 August, the remaining 14 hostages were released in northern Mali. Press reports claimed a ransom of 4.6 million euros was paid to the GSPC in return for the hostages' freedom

12 India
On 12 April 2003, in Anantnag, Kashmir, India, militants threw a grenade into a bus station, killing one and wounding 20, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

12 India
On 12 April 2003, in Anantnag, Kashmir, India, militants threw a grenade at an army patrol, wounding 23 (two soldiers and 21 civilian bystanders), according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

12 India
On 12 April 2003, in Kulgam, Kashmir, India, militants threw a grenade at a police patrol, but missed, wounding two civilian bystanders, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

12 Venezuela
On 12 April 2003, in Caracas, Venezuela, at 2:40 AM, a bomb made of C-4 exploded in the Organization of American States (OAS) office. No one was injured, but the basement was significantly damaged. No one claimed responsibility.

13 Pakistan
On 13 April 2003, near Chaman, Pakistan, armed militants shot relatives of the Governor of Kandahar, Afghanistan while they and the Governor were traveling by car to a local bazaar, killing two and wounding one, according to press reports. One attacker was later caught by authorities.

14 France
On 14 April 2003, in Sergy, France, militants set fire to a car parked outside the rear entrance of a McDonald's restaurant. The blaze partially destroyed the restaurant. No one claimed responsibility.

15 Turkey
On 15 April 2003, in Istanbul, Turkey, extremists bombed a McDonald's restaurant. A wall partially collapsed, injuring a pedestrian. The Revolutionary People's Liberation Party/Front (DHKP/C) claimed responsibility for this bombing.

15 Turkey
On 15 April 2003, in Istanbul, Turkey, extremists bombed a second McDonald's restaurant. No injuries were reported. The Revolutionary People's Liberation Front (DHKP/C) claimed responsibility for this bombing.

15 Gaza Strip
On 15 April 2003, at the Karni (Qarni) border crossing, Gaza Strip, a gunman, hiding in the inspection booths, killed two persons and wounded six others, all Israelis, according to media reports. The Islamic Resistance Movement (HAMAS) claimed responsibility.

16 Afghanistan
On 16 April 2003, in Jalalabad, Afghanistan, a bomb destroyed the UNICEF building, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

22 India
On 22 April 2003, in Gulshanpora Batagund, Kashmir, India, a bomb exploded in a dairy yard, killing six and wounding 12, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

24 Israel
On 24 April 2003, in Kefar Saba, Israel, a suicide bomber blew himself up at the entrance to a busy train station, killing a security guard, who was a dual citizen of Israel and Russia and wounding 11, according to press reports. The Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigade claimed responsibility.

25 India
On 25 April 2003, in Patan, Kashmir, India, a bomb exploded on the lawn of a courthouse, killing three and wounding 34, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

26 India
On 26 April 2003, in Kashmir, India, a landmine exploded near a site being inspected by the Finance Minister, injuring 11. The Finance Minister was not injured, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

30 Israel
On 30 April 2003, in Tel Aviv, Israel, suicide bombers attacked a pub, Mike's Place, popular with foreigners, just a few hundred yards from the U.S. Embassy. One of the bombers detonated his device, killing three Israeli citizens and wounding 64 others, including one U.S. citizen, according to press reports. The second bomber fled the scene after his bomb failed to detonate. His body was later found washed up on a Tel Aviv beach. The Islamic Resistance Movement (HAMAS) and Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigade have claimed responsibility.

May

5 India
On 5 May 2003, at 11:00 AM, in Doda, Kashmir, India, a bomb exploded at a bus stand. Victims included one killed and 25 injured, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

5 India
On 5 May 2003, in Duderhama, Kashmir, India, militants threw a grenade at a National Conference leader's car, injuring the leader who was inside, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

9 Israel
On 9 May 2003, in Sederot, Israel, six rockets fired on a kibbutz settlement injured two persons, according to press reports. The Islamic Resistance Movement (HAMAS) claimed responsibility.

12 Saudi Arabia
At about 11:15 PM, on 12 May 2003, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, suicide bombers driving booby-trapped cars filled with explosives drove into the guarded Jedawal compound, which housed international workers, killing four Saudi citizens, according to press reports. Al-Qaida is considered responsible.

12 Saudi Arabia
On 12 May 2003, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, suicide bombers driving booby-trapped cars filled with explosives drove into the Al-Hamra complex, killing 11 (one U.S. citizen, two Jordanian citizens, four Saudi citizens, two Filipino citizens, one Lebanese citizen, and one Swiss citizen) and wounding 194, according to press reports. Al-Qaida is considered responsible for this attack.

12 Saudi Arabia
On 12 May 2003, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, suicide bombers driving booby-trapped cars filled with explosives drove into the guarded Vinnell housing complex, killing 15 (eight U.S. citizens and seven Saudi citizens) and wounding 22 (including six U.S. citizens), according to press reports. Al-Qaida is considered responsible.

12 Algeria
According to press reports of 12 May 2003, terrorists had kidnapped a German tourist in the Sahara, bringing the total number of German tourists kidnapped recently to 16. The kidnapping possibly took place in April or early May timeframe. The Salafist Group for Call and Combat (GSPC) is considered responsible for the abduction.

From mid-February to mid-May, there were eight separate incidents of the kidnapping of European tourists by the GSPC. The 32 hostages from the various incidents were later intermingled. Algerian Special Forces rescued 17 hostages on May 13, 2003. One hostage, a German woman, died July 28 of heatstroke while in captivity. On 18 August, the remaining 14 hostages were released in northern Mali. Press reports claimed a ransom of 4.6 million euros was paid to the GSPC in return for the hostages' freedom.

16 Morocco
On 16 May 2003, in Morocco, five near-simultaneous bomb attacks occurred in Casablanca at or near a restaurant, hotel, Jewish cemetery, Jewish Community Center, and the Belgian Consulate, killing 33 (including three Spaniards and one Italian) and wounding 101, according to press reports. The group Salafiya Jihadiya with possible links to al-Qaida, is considered responsible.

19 Israel
At about 6:00 AM, on 19 May 2003, in French Hill Intersection, Northern Jerusalem, a suicide bomber dressed as an Orthodox Jew and wearing a prayer shawl boarded a commuter bus and detonated the bombs he had attached to himself. Victims included seven killed and 26 wounded (one U.S. citizen), according to press reports. The Islamic Resistance Movement (HAMAS) claimed responsibility for this attack.

19 India
On 19 May 2003, in Srinagar, Kashmir, India, two bombs exploded at Kashmir's busiest bus terminal, wounding 14, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

19 India
On 19 May 2003, in Rajouri, Kashmir, India, armed militants fired into a private residence, killing six, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

23 Gaza Strip
On 23 May 2003, in Netzarim, Gaza Strip, an anti-tank missile fired at an Israeli bus injured nine passengers, according to press reports. The Islamic Resistance Movement (HAMAS) claimed responsibility.

24 Afghanistan
On 24 May 2003, in Haska Meyna, Afghanistan, a remote-controlled land mine exploded under a vehicle. Three NGO workers were injured, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

27 Colombia
On 27 May 2003, in Guamalito, Colombia, guerillas attacked a section of the Cano Limon-Covenas oil pipeline, spilling nearly 7,000 barrels of crude oil and leaving about 4,700 families without drinking water, according to press reports.

This pipeline is jointly owned by Ecopetrol of Colombia and a consortium of U.S. and West European companies. No group claimed responsibility, although both the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia and the National Liberation Army (ELN) guerillas have attacked this pipeline previously.

June

1 India
On 1 June 2003, in Jammu, Kashmir, India, militants set fire to a private residence and exchanged gunfire with police while fleeing the scene, killing two civilians and wounding two others in the crossfire, according to press reports. The militants escaped. No one claimed responsibility.

4 Belgium
On 4 June 2003, in Brussels, Belgium, letters containing the nerve agent adamsite were sent to the U.S., British, and Saudi Embassies as well as the office of Prime Minister Guy Verhofstadt, the Court of Brussels, a Belgian ministry, the Oostende Airport, and the Antwerp Port Authority, according to press reports.

Victims included ten people who were hospitalized. At least two postal workers and five policemen were hospitalized with skin irritation, eye irritation, and breathing difficulty. In Oostende, three persons exposed to the tainted letter at the airport authority were taken to a hospital for further observation.

Belgian police investigated a 45-year-old Iraqi political refugee who had repeatedly expressed opposition to the war in Iraq. In searching the suspect's residence on 5 June, police confiscated a document that resembled a chemical formula and a plastic bag containing powder. The next day anti-terrorism investigators opened the plastic bag, releasing some of the powder and suffered skin irritation, eye irritation and difficulty breathing. The Iraqi was charged that day with premeditated assault.

7 Afghanistan
On 7 June 2003, in Kabul, Afghanistan, a taxi rigged with explosives rammed into a bus carrying German peacekeepers of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) heading to the airport for their return home. There were five killed and 29 wounded, according to press reports. The U.S.-funded police school, which stands about three hundred feet from the explosion, was damaged. No one claimed responsibility, but al-Qaida is suspected.

8 Somalia
On 8 June 2003, in Mogadishu, Somalia, an armed militia group fired several times on a car carrying an American freelance journalist, his driver, and his interpreter. The journalist was slightly wounded, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

9 Peru
On 9 June 2003, in Lima, Peru, approximately 60 Shining Path terrorists kidnapped 71 workers employed by Techint Group, an Argentine company helping to build a natural gas pipeline in southeastern Peru. The kidnapped group consisted of 64 Peruvians, four Colombians, two Argentines, and one Chilean. All of the hostages were freed on 11 June 2003 through a successful rescue operation by Peruvian authorities. The terrorists, however, managed to escape.

11 Turkey
In the afternoon of 11 June 2003, in Adana, Turkey, a man threw two hand grenades into the garden of the U.S. Consulate, allegedly in retaliation for a recent assassination attempt by Israel on a leader of the Islamic Resistance Movement (HAMAS). One of the grenades did not explode and was later securely detonated by the police. No one was injured, according to press reports.

11 Israel
On 11 June 2003, near Jerusalem, a suicide bomber who was a member of the Islamic Resistance Movement (HAMAS) boarded a bus and exploded a bomb near Klal Center on Jaffa Road, killing 17 (including two U.S. citizens) and wounding 99 (including one U.S citizen).

11 Greece
On the night of 11 June 2003, in Thessaloniki, Greece, unidentified attackers entered the front lobby of the U.S.-owned Citibank branch and doused the ATM in a flammable liquid. They then placed a gas canister in the ATM machine and set it on fire. The resulting explosion destroyed the machine and caused extensive damage to the lobby and office equipment, according to press reports.

17 Italy
In the early morning hours of 17 June 2003, in Rome, Italy, a bomb exploded in front of the Cervantes Spanish School (Liceo Cervantes), damaging the school and a few cars within a 20-meter radius. Authorities believe that the device contained approximately 500 grams of chlorite and nitrate-based explosives.

According to the Carabinieri, the roof of the school is the terrace of the Spanish Ambassador's residence. Although no one claimed responsibility for the attack, according to press reports, investigators believe that whoever placed the device had experience with explosives and was most likely connected to an Italian anarchist group that aligns itself with the ETA Basque terrorist group. Similar devices have been used in past attacks against Spanish targets and have been ultimately linked to Italian anarchists that support the ETA.

17 India
On 17 June 2003, in Khiram, Kashmir, India, armed militants entered a private residence and killed the son of a Muslim politician, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

17 India
On 17 June 2003, in Shopian, Kashmir, India, a bomb exploded outside a store, wounding five persons, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

18 France
On 18 June 2003, in Yvelines, France, militants from the Corsican National Liberation Front (FLNC) detonated explosive charges during the early morning hours, seriously damaging two French villas and a British housing company, according to press reports. The houses were unoccupied, and nobody was injured in the attack.

20 India
On 20 June 2003, in Srinagar, Kashmir, India, a bomb exploded at a crowded market, according to press reports, wounding 16. No one claimed responsibility.

20 India
On 20 June 2003, in Charar-i-Sharif, Kashmir, India, militants hurled a grenade at a police station, wounding two officers, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

20 West Bank
On 20 June 2003, in the West Bank, one was killed (a U.S. citizen) and three wounded in a shooting attack near the settlement of Ofra. The Islamic Resistance Movement (HAMAS) claimed responsibility.

23 India
On 23 June 2003, in Pulwama, Kashmir, India, militants threw a grenade at a military vehicle, but missed the intended target, killing two and wounding 48 (all civilian bystanders), according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

26 Kenya
On 26 June 2003, in Mandera, Kenya, armed militants attacked aid workers using hand grenades, killing one and seriously wounding four (including a doctor from the Netherlands working with the organization "Doctors Without Frontiers"), according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

28 Gaza Strip
On 28 June 2003, in Bayt Lahiyah, Gaza Strip, several bombs exploded near a U.S. Embassy car, according to press reports. The bombs were aimed at a diplomatic-plated vehicle belonging to the U.S. Consulate.

30 Israel
On 30 June 2003, in Yabed, Israel, a truck came under fire. Victims included one killed (a Bulgarian construction worker), according to press reports. The al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigade claimed responsibility.

July

3 Iraq
On 3 July 2003, in Baghdad, Iraq, militants killed a British journalist outside the Iraq National Museum, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

3 Colombia
On 3 July 2003, in Caldono, Colombia, armed militants kidnapped five people, including a Swiss citizen working for the non-governmental organization (NGO), Hands of Colombia Foundation, according to press reports. The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia claimed responsibility.

4 India
On 4 July 2003, in Larnu, Kashmir, India, militants opened fire and threw several grenades into a meeting between a rural development minister of Jammu Kashmir and health officials, killing two (a school teacher and a private citizen) and wounding 20 (including the two government officials, and two police officers), according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

9 India
On 9 July 2003, in Aram Mohalla Shopian, Kashmir, India, militants threw a grenade toward a security patrol party. The grenade missed the intended target and exploded on the roadside, injuring three persons, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

14 Afghanistan
On 14 July 2003, in Jalalabad, Afghanistan, in the early morning hours, a bomb exploded near the offices of the United Nations Human Rights Commission (UNHCR) causing major damage to both buildings, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

21 India
On 21 July 2003, in Jammu, Kashmir, India, two grenades exploded at a crowded community kitchen, killing seven and wounding 42, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

21 India
On 23 July 2003, in Katra, India, a bomb exploded near a Hindu temple, killing six persons and doing extensive damage to the temple, according to press reports. Lashkar-e-Tayyiba and the Students Islamic Movement of India are suspected.

August

2 Iraq
On 2 August 2003, in Baghdad, Iraq, a vehicle bomb exploded in front of the Jordanian Embassy, killing 19, wounding 50, and damaging the outside facade of the Embassy, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

4 India
On 4 August 2003, in Mahore Tehsil, Kashmir, India, armed militants shot and killed an educator attending a marriage function, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

5 Indonesia
On 5 August 2003, in Jakarta, Indonesia, a car bomb exploded in the front of the Marriott Hotel during lunchtime rush hour, killing 12 and wounding 149 (including two U.S. citizens), according to press reports. The adjoining office block was set on fire, with several cars burned in the hotel's front driveway, and windows in the hotel shattered to the height of 21 stories. Al-Qaida claimed responsibility.

5 Iraq
On 5 August 2003, in Tikrit, Iraq, an improvised explosive device detonated beneath a U.S. vehicle, killing one person, according to press reports. The U.S. citizen was a contractor with the firm Kellogg Brown and Root, a subsidiary of Halliburton. His vehicle was under military escort when the explosion occurred. No group has claimed responsibility.

5 India
On 5 August 2003, in Katjidhok, Kashmir, India, armed militants shot and killed one person, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

10 Eritrea
On 10 August 2003, in Adobha, Eritrea, armed militants attacked a vehicle carrying Eritrean passengers working for the U.S. charity Mercy Corps, killing two and wounding one, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility, though Eritrean authorities blamed Eritrean Islamic Jihad.

12 Israel
On 12 August 2003, in Ariel, Israel, a suicide bomber at the entrance of a shopping mall detonated explosives, killing two and injuring ten, according to press reports. The Islamic Resistance Movement (HAMAS) claimed responsibility for this attack.

13 India
On 13 August 2003, in Bandipora, Kashmir, India, a bomb attached to a bicycle exploded outside the State Bank of India, injuring 31, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility for the attack.

15 India
On 15 August 2003, in Pakherpora, Kashimir, India, a grenade thrown at a police patrol missed its target, exploding instead in a crowd of people standing nearby, injuring 18, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

19 Israel
On 19 August 2003, in Jerusalem, shortly after 9:00pm, a suicide bomber riding on a bus detonated explosives attached to him, killing 20 (five U.S. citizens) and wounding 140, according to press report. The Islamic Resistance Movement (HAMAS) claimed responsibility.

19 Iraq
On 19 August 2003, in Baghdad, Iraq, a truck drove into the driveway of the Canal Hotel housing the headquarters of the United Nations, was stopped by a security guard, then moved a few feet and exploded, killing 23 (three U.S. citizens and the UN Secretary General's Special Representative in Iraq) and wounding 100. It also badly damaged several stories of the Canal Hotel and other buildings almost a mile away, according to press reports. The arrested suspects stated the bomb was meant to go off in the hotel lobby, beneath a scheduled meeting of U.S. officials on the second floor.

25 India
On 25 August 2003, in Mumbai, India, two bombs detonated explosions near the Mumba Devi temple and the Gateway of India Historical monument, killing 40 and wounding 120, according to press reports. The Mumbai police commissioner reportedly suspects Lashkar-e-Tayyiba, but no group has claimed responsibility.

September

6 India
On 6 September 2003, in Srinagar, Kashmir, India, a bomb exploded in a busy marketplace, killing six and wounding 37 (including an Indian army officer), according to press reports. Police believe the intended target of the blast was the army officer. No one claimed responsibility.

8 Spain
On 8 September 2003, in Madrid, Spain, authorities safely defused a parcel bomb hidden in a book that was sent to the Greek Consulate, according to press reports. Authorities suspect an anarchist group is responsible.

9 Afghanistan
On 9 September 2003, near Moqor, Afghanistan, armed militants killed four Danish members working for the Danish Committee For Aid To Afghan Refugees (DACAAR), a non-governmental organization (NGO) assisting local Afghanis on an irrigation project, according to press reports. The Taliban are probably responsible.

9 India
On 9 September 2003, in Sopat, Kashmir, India, armed militants shot at a former State Forest minister, injuring him slightly and killing one security officer, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

9 Israel
On 9 September 2003, in Jerusalem, a suicide bomber blew himself up at the Caf� Hillel, killing seven (two U.S. citizens) and wounding 47, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

11 India
On 11 September 2003, in Srinagar, Kashmir, India, a grenade was thrown at a military bunker house, missing its target, killing one private citizen and injuring 14 others standing nearby, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

14 Colombia
On 14 September 2003, in Tayrona National Park, Colombia, armed militants attacked several cabins in the national park, kidnapping eight foreign nationals (four Israelis, two Britons, one German, and one Spaniard), according to press reports. On 25 September 2003, one of the two kidnapped Britons escaped safely from the kidnappers. On 24 November 2003, the German and Spanish nationals were released. The National Liberation Army (ELN) has claimed responsibility for this attack.

15 Somalia
On 15 September 2003, in the Gedo region of southwestern Somalia, a Kenyan aid worker was murdered by suspected Islamic militants, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

19 Afghanistan
On 19 September 2003, in Ghazni, Afghanistan, four rockets were fired at a facility housing Turkish road workers and equipment, causing no injuries or damage, according to press reports. The Taliban are probably responsible.

22 Iraq
On 22 September 2003, in Baghdad, Iraq, a vehicle bomb exploded near the United Nations (UN) headquarters, killing a guard and injuring 18 others, according to press reports. No damage was done to the UN headquarters. No one claimed responsibility.

25 Iraq
On 25 September 2003, in Baghdad, Iraq, a bomb exploded at the news bureau of the U.S. NBC broadcast network, killing one person and injuring one other, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

30 India
On 30 September 2003, in Gagran, Kashmir, India, a grenade thrown at a police patrol exploded, injuring six police officers and 14 civilians, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

October

4 Israel
On 4 October 2003, in Haifa, Israel, a suicide bomber blew himself up at the Maxim Restaurant, killing 20 persons and injuring 60 others, including a U.S. citizen. The Palestinian Islamic Jihad (PIJ) claimed responsibility.

5 Malaysia
On 5 October 2003, in Sabah, Malaysia, armed militants kidnapped six persons from a resort area. One escaped, but on 29 October 2003, in Languyan, Philippines, the remaining five hostages (three Indonesians and two Filipinos) were found executed, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility. The Abu Sayyaf Group is suspected of having conducted the kidnappings and executions.

5 Somalia
On 5 October 2003, in Borama, Somalia, armed militants shot and killed an elderly Italian nun, according to press reports. Two suspects were subsequently arrested.

9 Iraq
On 9 October 2003, in Baghdad, Iraq, armed militants shot and killed a Spanish military attach� at his private residence, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

12 Iraq
On 12 October 2003, in Baghdad, Iraq, a vehicle bomb exploded near the Baghdad Hotel housing U.S. and Iraqi officials, killing eight persons and wounding 45 others, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

14 Iraq
On 14 October 2003, in Baghdad, Iraq, a suicide car bomb detonated near the Turkish Embassy, wounding one Turkish and one Iraqi employee, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

15 Gaza Strip
On 15 October 2003, in the Gaza Strip, a U.S. Embassy Tel Aviv motorcade was struck by an apparent roadside charge, according to press reports. The blast destroyed the second car in the convoy, killing three and wounding one (all U.S. citizens). The victims were working for a contracting firm providing security for the United States in Israel and the Middle East. The Popular Resistance Committee initially claimed responsibility but later said it was not responsible.

15 India
On 15 October 2003, in Lolab, Kashmir, India, rebels triggered a landmine in a forested area. Victims included nine wounded, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

20 India
On 20 October 2003, in Battamaloo, Kashmir, India, a grenade hurled at a police security patrol missed its target and exploded at a busy bus stop. Victims included one killed and 53 wounded, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

20 India
On 20 October 2003, in Anantnag, Kashmir, India, a grenade thrown at a security patrol missed its target and exploded in a busy market. Victims included one killed and seven wounded, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

20 Somalia
On 20 October 2003, in northern Somalia, two British teachers were shot and killed inside their residence on an SOS Children's Villages compound, according to press reports. Somaliland authorities, who suspected the involvement of Islamist militants, arrested several persons by year's end.

20 India
On 20 October 2003, in Doda, Kashmir, India, armed militants shot and killed two persons, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

26 Iraq
On 26 October 2003, in Baghdad, Iraq, rockets were fired at the al-Rashid Hotel, which was housing U.S. and Coalition personnel. One person was killed (a U.S. military officer) and 15 were wounded (including a U.S. citizen Department of State employee assigned to the Coalition Provisional Authority). The blast also damaged the hotel, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

26 India
On 26 October 2003, in Bijbehara, Kashmir, India, a grenade thrown at a military convoy missed its target and exploded on the road, injuring 14 persons (including one police officer and a worker in the office of the Indo-Tibetan border police), according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

26 India
On 26 October 2003, in Samba, Kashmir, India, a bomb exploded in the toilet of a coach car, causing no injuries but derailing five cars, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

26 India
On 26 October 2003, in Gagal, Kashmir, India, armed militants dressed in army uniforms hijacked a car, killing two of the occupants and injuring four others, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

27 Iraq
On 27 October 2003, in Baghdad, Iraq, a car bomb exploded inside the compound of the headquarters of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), killing 12 persons and injuring 22 others, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

27 Afghanistan
On 27 October 2003, in Shkin, Afghanistan, armed militants ambushed and killed two U.S. government contract workers, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

28 India
On 28 October 2003, in Lal Chowk, Kashmir, India, a bomb exploded at the customer billing counter in a busy telegraph office building, injuring 36 persons, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

29 India
On 29 October 2003, in Anantnag, Kashmir, India, a grenade thrown at a police patrol missed its target and exploded in a busy market, injuring 13 persons, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

30 Afghanistan
On 30 October 2003, between Moqor and Ghazni Districts in Afghanistan, armed militants kidnapped a Turkish engineer and his driver, threatening to kill them unless the Afghan government released six of its leaders, according to press reports. Following negotiations with the kidnappers, both were subsequently released. The Taliban are suspected.

November

8 Saudi Arabia

On 8 November 2003, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, a bomb attack on a residential compound killed 17 foreigners, mostly from Arab states, and injured 122 others, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

10 Iraq
On 10 November 2003, in Samarra, Iraq, a remote-controlled bomb was detonated against a convoy, injuring three Fijians working for a British security firm, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

11 Greece
On 11 November 2003, in Athens, Greece, authorities neutralized an explosive device that was detected outside an Athens Citibank Branch. An unidentified person phoned an Athens newspaper and announced that a bomb was going to explode at the bank, according to press reports. The Organization Khristos Kassimis was probably responsible.

11 Afghanistan
On 11 November 2003, in Kandahar, Afghanistan, a vehicle bomb exploded outside the office of the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA), killing one person, injuring one other, and causing major damage to the building, according to press reports. The Taliban or al-Qaida may have been responsible.

12 Iraq
On 12 November 2003, in al-Nasiriyah, Iraq, two vehicles approached the Italian Carabinieri Corps' MSU (Multinational Specialized Unit) command post. A white car with four persons inside preceded another, heavier vehicle carrying explosives. When the first vehicle passed in front of the Carabinieri base, diversionary shots were fired from the lead vehicle, while the second truck reached the target and exploded, resulting in the death of 19 Italians and 13 Iraqi civilians, according to media reports. At least 80 others were wounded in the attack. Abu-Muhammad Ablay later claimed responsibility for the al-Nasiriyah attack on behalf of al-Qaida in an email to the Saudi weekly al-Majallah.

14 India
On 14 November 2003, in Pulwama, Kashmir, India, militants opened fire on a Christian school and on a bus from the same school, causing no injuries, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

15 India
On 15 November 2003, in Pulwama, Kashmir, India, a grenade thrown by militants at a Christian missionary school landed on the lawn and exploded, injuring nine (including two employees of the school and a police guard), according to press reports. No one has claimed responsibility.

15 Turkey
On 15 November 2003, in Istanbul, Turkey, a vehicle bomb exploded at the Beth Israel synagogue, killing four and wounding 60, according to press reports. Turkish authorities believe the same group is also responsible for the other incidents on November 15 and 20 in Istanbul. Turkish authorities have arrested some of the persons believed responsible for these attacks. Others remain at large.

15 Turkey
On 15 November 2003, in Istanbul, Turkey, a vehicle bomb exploded at the Neve Shalom synagogue, killing 16 and wounding 240, according to press reports. Many of the casualties were passersby. Turkish authorities believe the same group is also responsible for the other incidents on November 15 and 20 in Istanbul. Turkish authorities have arrested some of the persons believed responsible for these attacks. Others remain at large.

15 Colombia
On 15 November 2003, in Bogota, Colombia, two fragmentation grenades exploded in two crowded bars, the Bogota Beer Company and Palos De Moguer Bar, killing one person and injuring 72 others (including three U.S. citizens), according to press reports. The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) is suspected.

16 Afghanistan
On 16 November 2003, in Ghazni, Afghanistan, armed militants riding on a motorcycle shot and killed a French national working for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees and wounded her driver while they were driving through a local bazaar, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

19 Israel
On 19 November 2003, in Arava, Israel, a terrorist at the Arava border terminal shot and killed one and wounded four South American tourists, apparently from Ecuador. The terrorist was killed by authorities, according to press reports.

20 Turkey
On 20 November 2003, in Istanbul, Turkey, a vehicle loaded with explosives exploded in front of the British Consulate, killing 30 people, including the Consul General, and wounding 450 others, according to press reports. Turkish authorities believe the same group is also responsible for the other incidents on November 15 and 20 in Istanbul. Turkish authorities have arrested some of the persons believed responsible for these attacks. Others remain at large.

20 Turkey
On 20 November 2003, in Istanbul, Turkey, a vehicle bomb detonated outside the HSBC bank, killing 11 people, wounding 105 others, and causing significant damage to the building, according to press reports. Turkish authorities believe the same group is also responsible for the other incidents on November 15 and 20 in Istanbul. Turkish authorities have arrested some of the persons believed responsible for these attacks. Others remain at large.

21 Iraq
On 21 November 2003, in Baghdad, Iraq, at 7:20 AM, at least six rockets were fired at hotels where Western journalists and Coalition contractors stay. The rockets hit the Palestine Hotel, heavily damaging at least five floors and slightly damaging the 16th and 18th floors of the Sheraton Hotel located next door. A U.S. contractor was wounded, according to press reports. A makeshift multiple rocket launcher with 30 unfired rockets in its tubes was found later close to the Italian Embassy. No group claimed responsibility.

22 Iraq
On 22 November 2003, over Baghdad, Iraq, the wing of a DHL parcel service cargo plane caught on fire when it was struck by a SAM-7, man-portable surface-to-air missile, according to press reports. The plane managed to land safely. No one claimed responsibility.

23 Afghanistan
On 23 November 2003, in Kabul, Afghanistan, a rocket was fired at the Intercontinental Hotel, which was crowded with guests, including foreign diplomats, journalists, and UN aid workers. The attack caused no injuries and only minor damage, according to press reports. Though there was no claim of responsibility, authorities suspected remnants of Taliban and al-Qaida for the attack.

27 Algeria
On 27 November 2003, in Messad, Algeria, a well-known poet and member of the extended Royal Saudi family was killed and four others were injured in an apparent terrorist attack, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility, but authorities suspected the Salafist Group for Call and Combat (GSPC) was responsible.

30 Iraq
On 30 November 2003, in Tikrit, Iraq, militants shot and killed two Japanese diplomats, according to press reports. An organization, believed to have been al-Qaida, said in statements issued in mid-October and mid-November that Japan and other countries helping the U.S. would be targeted.

30 Iraq
On 30 November 2003, near the city of Tikrit, Iraq, armed militants shot and killed two South Koreans and wounded two others while they were riding in a car belonging to the former Iraqi president Saddam Hussein. The Koreans were working for South Korea's OMU Electric Company, which has a subcontract to a U.S. company building a power transmission line in Iraq. No one claimed responsibility.

December

2 India
On 2 December 2003, in Kashmir, India, 18 policemen were injured when militants threw a grenade at the District police headquarters, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

3 Afghanistan
On 3 December 2003, in Kandahar, Afghanistan, two Americans were injured when an attacker threw a grenade at their vehicle, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

10 India
On 10 December 2003, in Kashmir, India, one policeman and one civilian were killed and six others were wounded when two suspected terrorists threw grenades and opened fire at a bus stop, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

12 Iraq
On 12 December 2003, in Beyci, Iraq, an armed group targeting a restaurant killed two Turkish truck drivers in an attack, according to press reports. No one claimed responsibility.

19 Iraq
On 19 December 2003, eyewitnesses said that three gunmen in a car opened fire on a UN building. There were no casualties, and no one claimed responsibility.

29 Iraq
On 29 December 2003, in Baghdad, Iraq, unidentified gunmen opened fire on a vehicle killing two Iraqi sentries and a British engineer in the Mahmudia neighborhood. No one claimed responsibility.

30 India
On 30 December 2003, in Kashmir, India, a woman and 33 soldiers were injured and four were killed in an explosion targeting a bus carrying Indian troops. Hizbul-Mujahedin claimed responsibility.

31 Iraq
On 31 December 2003, in Baghdad, Iraq, a car bomb exploded outside Nabil Restaurant, killing eight people and wounding 35 others. According to press reports, the wounded included three Los Angeles Times reporters (all U.S. citizens) and three local employees. No one claimed responsibility.