PRM-UNHCR Framework for Cooperation for 2014-2015
Report
April 11, 2014

I. Introduction

The Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration at the United States Department of State (hereinafter referred to as PRM) and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (hereinafter referred to as UNHCR) have been working in formal partnership through a Framework for Cooperation since the year 2000 to provide protection, humanitarian assistance, and durable solutions to UNHCR’s beneficiaries. They have a unique relationship: PRM has long been UNHCR’s top donor, while UNHCR has been PRM’s largest multilateral partner. PRM and UNHCR renew their bilateral Framework for Cooperation biennially to advance shared objectives.

This document focuses on three elements: 1) shared objectives and priorities; 2) continued consolidation of UNHCR’s results-based managerial reforms; and 3) improved accountability and monitoring. It concludes by establishing a schedule of regular bilateral consultations and reporting on progress.

In its entirety, this Framework for Cooperation constitutes policy commitments by UNHCR and PRM and is therefore not intended to be legally binding. In the interest of transparency it will be posted on the U.S. Department of State website.

II. Shared Objectives and Priorities

PRM and UNHCR will work together to achieve, by the end of 2015:

a) Continued progress in the application of the Age Gender and Diversity approach (AGD) through improved protection for vulnerable persons. This includes an increased emphasis on ensuring that protection of women and children, including addressing Gender Based Violence (GBV) at the onset of emergencies, is prioritized;

b) Advancing solutions for refugees, including resettlement, particularly for those in protracted situations;

c) Continued operationalization of UNHCR’s urban refugee policy;

d) Addressing UNHCR’s funding shortfall in its global biennial budget by 25% by the end of 2015; and

e) Continued progress in UNHCR’s Global Strategic Priorities.

UNHCR continues to develop policies to address the changing nature of displacement (especially with regard to urban refugees and mixed migratory flows), to draw attention to overlooked populations of concern (like those in protracted refugee situations and those who are stateless), and to protect its staff and beneficiaries in an increasingly insecure environment using appropriate risk-based analyses and approaches. PRM attaches great importance to these initiatives and urges UNHCR to focus its limited resources on core mandate responsibilities for the protection of refugees and stateless persons, as well as its responsibilities for protection and assistance to conflict-affected internally displaced persons (IDPs) under the UN cluster system as the global cluster lead agency for protection, emergency shelter, and camp coordination and camp management. The United States, along with other key donors, places great importance on the UN’s Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) efforts at humanitarian reform and will continue to track developments and progress with the cluster system. Of particular importance is UNHCR’s new refugee coordination model, which will interface with the IDP cluster system, enhance inter-agency collaboration, and ensure the needs of all populations of concern are met, while at the same time preserving UNHCR’s mandated responsibilities for the protection of refugees and stateless persons. Under the auspices of the Transformative Agenda, PRM encourages UNHCR to further invest in strong leadership by continuing to propose high quality (and a larger number of) candidates for the IASC Humanitarian Coordinator pool. PRM also encourages UNHCR to plan to identify individuals within the organization who have the potential to become Humanitarian Coordinators and help to develop career paths for them, including creating an incentive structure that rewards the choice to serve as Humanitarian Coordinator.

Continued progress in UNHCR’s AGD approach and prevention of gender-based violence through Safe from the Start

UNHCR’s Forward Plan sets out concrete and measureable actions for implementing the AGD approach through 2016. Among other things, the Forward Plan lays down seven strategic results to be achieved over a five-year period and reflects UNHCR’s vision of a fully-mainstreamed AGD approach. PRM will monitor the ongoing mainstreaming of age, gender and diversity in the organization for all populations of concern including indicators to verify when success is achieved, as well as strengthened oversight by senior managers and the Executive Committee. PRM and UNHCR will continue consultations on AGD-related issues, including prevention and response to gender-based violence (particularly at the onset of emergencies), children and adolescent/youth issues, as well as strengthening focus on persons with disabilities, as implementation of the Forward Plan progresses. PRM encourages UNHCR to use relevant Sphere and Interagency Standing Committee principles on protection, gender, and gender-based violence to guide its response to the needs of women, youth, and children.

Through the U.S. Government’s (USG) Safe from the Start initiative, and in order to catalyze a meaningful transformation in the way that UNHCR operates with regard to GBV prevention, UNHCR will engage in the following activities with the expectation that after a three-year period these positions and training programs would be integrated into UNHCR’s core work:

1. Establish six additional senior dedicated staff recruited and deployed to improve UNHCR’s GBV responses in ongoing and new emergencies (East and Horn of Africa, West Africa, Central Africa, Asia (Burma), and the Middle East. Hire one senior program coordinator based in the Division of International Protection (DIP) and in HQ to support and coordinate all activities for Safe from the Start.

2. Establish an innovation challenge to country operations in two locations to be agreed on with PRM, to incentivize and assess creative responses to GBV challenges.

3. Develop a GBV learning initiatives package including:

i) Development and rollout of a mandatory GBV e-learning module, for all staff at or above the G-5 level;

ii) Review and roll-out of a GBV facilitators’ guide which will enable UNHCR and partner staff to conduct training programs on GBV for a variety of target audiences in all types of contexts;

iii) Development and implementation of a “Programming for Protection” learning program to build the capacity of mid-level and senior (P3, P4 and above) program and protection staff to ensure comprehensive programmatic responses to GBV and other protection issues.

4. Hire an external monitoring and evaluation consultant to develop a framework for evaluation of all aspects of Safe from the Start funding.

Advancing solutions for refugees

PRM will support UNHCR efforts to increase the number of refugees referred for resettlement to all countries and to ensure that resettlement needs are adequately funded within the organization. PRM will continue to provide earmarked funding for selected resettlement activities that were not initially prioritized, and will continue to work with UNHCR to mainstream funding for such activities in the year(s) following the provision of PRM earmarked funds. PRM urges UNHCR to fully fund the three Emergency Transit Facilities and the ICMC deployment scheme within its prioritized plan. Likewise, UNHCR encourages PRM to share information on the local integration of resettled refugees in the United States to ensure that durable solutions have been achieved.

PRM and UNHCR will work together to refine and launch UNHCR’s re-invigorated effort to achieve solutions for persons of concern. Building on lessons learned from the UNHCR-UNDP Transitional Solutions Initiative (TSI+) in Colombia and East Sudan, UNHCR recently created a new in-house Solutions Steering Group (SSG) charged with taking a fresh look at UNHCR’s approach to solutions globally and with implementing a more strategic, evidence-based approach. The SSG is in the process of choosing priority operations for the next biennium (and beyond), in which activities will eventually be rolled out as part of a new global solutions initiative that will succeed TSI+. The new initiative will be formally launched at the Copenhagen Solutions Roundtable in April 2014, and should include the creation of a new global network of supporters with affected states and civil society as equal partners. PRM will participate in this new network, and provide support that it considers appropriate in order to advance solutions projects in priority countries. PRM will assist UNHCR’s effort to raise the profile of UNHCR’s solutions work generally.

Operationalization of UNHCR’s Urban Refugee Policy

Only one-third of the world’s refugees are currently living in camps, and the majority of the other two-thirds are living in urban areas where they can sometimes access larger economies and an array of services. These proportions represent dramatically different demographic patterns of forcibly displaced people over the last decade. Thus, PRM has recognized the need for a more deliberate, consistent and coherent strategy to address the challenges posed by urban refugees, and in response published a new urban policy in 2011. This internal effort followed UNHCR’s own efforts to disseminate and implement a policy in this area. In September 2009, UNHCR issued a revised policy on refugee protection and solutions in urban areas. The approach outlined in the revised policy envisions UNHCR’s role in urban settings as less of a service provider than a facilitator and advocate to support refugee rights and self-sufficiency; to proactively reach out to vulnerable urban refugees and assess their individual needs using innovative approaches; to partner with and support local service providers; and to forge new partnerships with development actors, local authorities and the private sector. PRM’s policy is consistent with UNHCR’s, and much of PRM’s strategy involves supporting UNHCR efforts to implement its global policy. PRM will continue to monitor UNHCR’s implementation of the urban refugee policy, including its funding, applications in emergency settings, standards of assistance, appropriate staff training and learning exercises, and the provision of services to urban returnees, so as to ensure that UNHCR is undertaking the broad institutional changes necessary to implement the policy consistently. This review will include an ongoing appraisal of the financial and human resources devoted to the urban refugee programs. To this end, PRM encourages UNHCR to develop a methodology to better track resource allocations for non-camp[1] populations, where the funding was spent, and how this has impacted ongoing programming, and to report this information in its Biennial Program Budget and Budget Updates. The current budgetary software does not distinguish between camp-based and urban populations, but breakdowns of expenditures on camp and non-camp populations may be possible. In areas where work with urban refugees is already the norm, PRM encourages UNHCR and other partners to explicitly identify such activities and programs specific to urban refugees in the budget and reporting as possible.

Addressing UNHCR’s funding shortfall in its global biennial budget

UNHCR’s budget structure is divided into four pillars: refugees, stateless persons, reintegration activities, and internally displaced persons (IDPs). The budget is based upon needs (rather than projected income). UNHCR’s overall budget for 2014 is $5.31 billion; in 2015 it is $5.18 billion; these figures will be revised during the course of 2014 and 2015 to reflect the changing needs and circumstances on the ground.

Recognizing the need for early and predictable funding, PRM will strive to provide flexible and early contributions to UNHCR that will be applied to all four pillars. PRM had traditionally defined its fair share contribution to UNHCR as between 22 and 25 percent of UNHCR’s annual budget, which had been based on projected income. Given its restructured budget which is now based on needs, PRM’s contributions have been closer to 18-19 percent of UNHCR’s annual budget. PRM is committed to continuing to provide a robust, fair share contribution to UNHCR’s annual program budget (Global Appeal). This level of support is contingent upon funding availability as well as UNHCR’s demonstration of needs and results.

UNHCR will make every effort to ensure that any funding increases by the United States would come with corresponding increases by other donors in order to accurately reflect the U.S. ‘fair share’ approach. PRM and UNHCR will work together to expand UNHCR’s donor base and to increase government, private sector, and pooled funds contributions. Through these efforts, UNHCR will aim to decrease its funding shortfall from 40 percent of its global biennial budget at the end of 2013 to 25 percent at the end of 2015.

Continued progress in UNHCR’s Global Strategic Priorities

UNHCR has identified 16 Global Strategic Priorities (GSPs), known as Global Engagements, to inform its allocation of resources in 2014 and 2015. They are consistent with PRM’s own strategic planning and annual reporting – particularly the GSPs related to protection and durable solutions, assistance, and resettlement. The PRM-UNHCR bilateral dialogue over the next two years will focus on these GSPs, which represent areas of critical concern for the organization, where UNHCR will make concerted efforts to strengthen protection, improve the quality of life, and seek solutions for refugees and other persons of concern. Each GSP will be monitored through the use of aggregated targets called Global Engagements and the use of impact indicators from the UNHCR Results Framework. Of note, the targets for UNHCR’s GSPs are based on the activities prioritized by country operations.

Reporting on Global Engagements highlights overall results among the countries reporting – both positive and negative – of the work carried out by UNHCR and its partners in priority areas. Progress on situation-level indicators will be compiled to show broad levels of achievement, reflected/summarized in the Engagements. UNHCR will provide PRM with an overview of the number of situations where improvements are made, based on engagements set for 2014-15. Specific examples of achievements based on country-level baseline information will be included in the narrative in order to give context to the overall results. UNHCR will also highlight transparently the number of operations that are not achieving progress in raising protection standards for persons of concern and reasons why achievements were not met. This information will be used to jointly identify lessons learned and areas for improvement. Global Engagements will enable UNHCR to track and report back more comprehensively and transparently on how UNHCR overall has progressed towards the targets set by the different operations, and serve to consolidate results orientation. Global Engagements are anchored within UNHCR’s overall results-based management strategy, allowing the organization to clearly identify performance gaps, troubleshoot problems, and ensure resources are channeled to areas most in need of improvement.

To demonstrate impact and effectiveness in a quantifiable way, UNHCR has strategically identified the most relevant priority objectives and indicators that operations engaged in these GSP areas will be required to report on in the coming biennium. All key operations will report on this sub-set of the most relevant objectives and indicators in the coming biennium: eight operational GSPs are field-based and eight support and management GSPs are Headquarters/Regional-based. The Organization will closely monitor progress towards the targets set by operations at the country level in order to gauge overall developments in raising standards for persons of concern. UNHCR operations have undertaken to fine-tune monitoring and reporting, by ensuring that GSP indicators for 2014 and 2015 are integrated into implementation arrangements with partners and existing monitoring systems, so that the situation of populations of concern in priority areas is regularly tracked. The support and management GSPs highlight key areas for strengthening management functions and support to the field.

Within UNHCR’s GSPs are three specific indicators that PRM has included in its annual performance plan and report. For these indicators, UNHCR and PRM have mutually established the following out year targets:

1. The percentage of monitored camps in protracted refugee situations where the mortality rate of children under five (<5 MR) does not exceed emergency thresholds.

Targets:

  • CY 2014: <5 MR does not surpass 1.5/1,000/month in 79% of monitored protracted refugee sites.
  • CY 2015: <5 MR does not surpass 1.5/1,000/month in 81% of monitored protracted refugee sites.
  • CY 2016: <5 MR does not surpass 1.5/1,000/month in 83% of monitored protracted refugee sites.

2. The percentage of surveyed camps in protracted refugee situations where global acute malnutrition (GAM) does not exceed 10%.

Targets:

  • CY 2014: GAM not to exceed 10% in 75% of surveyed households in Protracted Refugee Situations.
  • CY 2015: GAM not to exceed 10% in 76% of surveyed households in Protracted Refugee Situations.
  • CY 2016: GAM not to exceed 10% in 77% of surveyed households in Protracted Refugee Situations.

3. The percentage of the population of concern[2] who have returned home or have been resettled to a third country.

Targets:

  • CY 2014: 69% of the population of concern have returned home or have been resettled to a third country
  • CY 2015: 71% of the population of concern have returned home or have been resettled to a third country
  • CY 2016: 73% of the population of concern have returned home or have been resettled to a third country

Like UNHCR, PRM anticipates that a simplified approach of reporting on targeted GSPs will better enable UNHCR to report on overall progress and impact, and in turn be able to better communicate results to its stakeholders. As the Global Engagements are embedded within the existing structures and in FOCUS, they streamline and harmonize reporting requirements on UNHCR’s key priorities. UNHCR and PRM will continue to track progress on this approach through bilateral consultations.

III. Consolidation of UNHCR’s Results-Based Managerial Reforms

In order to be more responsive and accountable to its donors as well as to populations of concern UNHCR has, through a multi-year reform process, transitioned into a results-based organization. It is critical that UNHCR be able to show the impact of U.S. and other donors’ funding as well as to demonstrate the consequences of unmet needs. In this regard, PRM maintains interest in UNHCR having a fully functioning and accessible results-based management system, including Global FOCUS. This online web portal should provide access to regularly updated operational information on selected UNHCR operations sourced from the Focus operations management database application.

PRM believes that the reform process initiated in 2011 is beginning to show tangible results in institutional performance. UNHCR notes PRM’s continued concerns with ensuring sufficient technical staffing capacity and presence at all levels and is committed to addressing any identified structural gaps and weaknesses in the field and in Headquarters, but will do so cautiously and with maximum flexibility to avoid creating a significant bureaucratic apparatus, especially given the high cost of creating and maintaining Headquarters positions. PRM will continue to encourage UNHCR, both bilaterally and in governance fora, to implement a Global Needs Assessment-based budget for headquarters to meet outstanding needs in staffing, capacity, and expertise.

Maintaining the momentum of the many reforms instituted in recent years is a shared priority of UNHCR and PRM in the coming biennium.

IV. Improved Accountability and Monitoring

Improved accountability, including through a fully functioning and effective results-based management system (e.g., an updated MSRP, an accessible and functioning external Global Focus, and strengthened oversight mechanisms) is key to effectively managing UNHCR’s operations, donor funding, and the needs of beneficiaries. Given the large number of emergencies UNHCR has had to respond to in recent years and a correspondingly larger budget to manage, there are greater expectations of enhanced oversight by UNHCR of its programs.

Ensuring continued progress in addressing gaps in the accountability framework, enterprise risk management, results-based management, and financial and program controls have been identified as key areas of focus. PRM notes the High Commissioner’s ongoing commitment to addressing recommendations in the Board of Auditors annual reports, including implementation of an organization-wide approach to risk management, development of an enhanced framework for implementation with partners, improved management of procurement, and management and oversight over implementing partners, as well as those of the Independent Audit and Oversight Committee (IAOC), including the development of an accountability matrix on enterprise risk management.

UNHCR’s establishment of an Internal Compliance and Accountability Committee (ICAC), which aims to improve UNHCR’s accountability system through monitoring the implementation of recommendations received from its various internal and external oversight bodies, is a positive step towards ensuring that UNHCR is proactively addressing and managing risks and that the organization is promoting accountability from the top down.

PRM will seek to ensure that UNHCR is allocating sufficient human and financial resources to fully implement measures to improve accountability, transparency (oversight) and program management and will request regular updates on progress. PRM and UNHCR will work together with other Executive Committee Members to ensure the consideration and, where appropriate, full implementation of key recommendations made by the Division of Financial and Administrative Management (DFAM), the Policy Development and Evaluation Service (PDES), the Division of Program Support and Management (DPSM), the Inspector General’s Office (IGO), and others.

As UNHCR continues to increase its reliance on implementing partners in the field, PRM welcomes efforts by UNHCR to improve its partnerships with NGOs, including through UNHCR’s management process (Framework for Implementation with Partners) and through the High Commissioner’s Structured Dialogue. Likewise, the new refugee coordination model for mixed IDP/refugee situations will add predictability to the overall humanitarian response and ensure all populations of concern are protected and assisted. PRM will closely follow UNHCR’s work on this issue, which aims to improve its internal policies and procedures to enhance partnerships, clarify accountabilities and improve outcomes for refugees and persons of concern.

PRM monitors UNHCR on a regular basis and in a number of ways, including through participation in UNHCR board meetings, analyzing its Global Report, annual reports and updates, undertaking field visits by PRM regional refugee coordinators (RefCoords) and PRM program officers, and briefings with UNHCR staff. In addition to this bilateral framework which was instituted in 2000, PRM conducts annual field-based analyses of UNHCR’s Country Operations Planning (COP) exercise (spring) which provide insight into UNHCR's planning process, as well as the overall direction of its programs in a given country/region, and insight into institutional reform issues such as results-based management, budgeting, and emergency response. PRM will continue to share with UNHCR the results of these analyses and welcomes feedback from UNHCR on follow-up actions undertaken in response to PRM findings and recommendations. PRM has a close working relationship with UNHCR and is in daily contact with the organization, either through the U.S. Permanent Mission in Geneva (Refugee and Migration Affairs Section) or in the field through PRM RefCoords. Through regular reporting and dialogue with UNHCR, PRM will continue to monitor closely the organization’s work. PRM also aims to ensure that UNHCR is strengthening its capacity to monitor its own programs and that it is effectively coordinating with other oversight and monitoring functions within the organization to support program evaluation.

V. Communication and Partnership

In pursuit of meeting the goals and achieving the results articulated under this Framework, UNHCR and PRM will remain committed to continuous information sharing and cooperation at all levels. UNHCR colleagues in the field will work closely with PRM RefCoords and Embassy-based staff to keep PRM informed of developments on the ground, to involve PRM in the annual Country Operations Planning exercise, and to communicate achievements and challenges throughout the year. UNHCR Headquarters-based staff will continue to work closely with the U.S. Permanent Mission in Geneva and to share information regularly and discuss strategies and plans. UNHCR’s Regional Office in Washington, DC, will remain the primary U.S.-based interlocutor with PRM’s Washington, DC-based staff, and the Donor Relations and Resource Mobilization (DRRM) Service at Headquarters and the Refugee and Migration Affairs (RMA) Section at the U.S. Permanent Mission in Geneva will manage all funding-related communications and matters.

UNHCR acknowledges U.S. concerns regarding appropriate representation of U.S. nationals in the organization. While fully respecting relevant UN Rules and Regulations, UNHCR fully intends to continue to make every effort to attract and promote the U.S. interest in employment with UNHCR by providing information on external vacancies via the Internet and other fora, as well as widely disseminating the eligibility criteria for UNHCR regular employment and the Junior Professional Officer program. In accordance with UNHCR Human Resources rules and regulations, UNHCR is committed to ensuring that all staff, including American nationals, is considered for promotion in accordance with UNHCR Human Resources rules and regulations. UNHCR is also committed to reviewing the level of retention of American staff.

Deepening public understanding and informed commitment is a part of the global humanitarian response. UNHCR has established visibility guidelines which will be disseminated to its field operations and will work to ensure adequate reflection of U.S. and other major donor support in the field and in public information tools.

VI. Bilateral Consultations and Reporting

PRM and UNHCR will continue to hold semi-annual Framework discussions on policy and program issues identified in this document. Mid-year Framework discussions will take place in June, while end-of-year Framework discussions will take place in December. PRM and UNHCR will prepare a joint written report following the mid-year and end-of-year discussions. In the fall of 2015, the Framework for Cooperation document will be revised to cover 2016-2017.

Reflecting the principles of Good Humanitarian Donorship, PRM believes that with exceptions noted below, standardized UNHCR reporting on its GSPs and performance targets will satisfy PRM requirements in 2014 and 2015. In addition, UNHCR will provide PRM with survey and surveillance data on Crude Mortality Rates (CMR) and Global Acute Malnutrition (GAM) for refugees as well as reporting on expenditure of USG broadly earmarked contributions on a yearly basis. Given the importance of this data for shaping evidence-based policies and programs, UNHCR commits to provide the following reports on or before associated dates as follows in 2014 and 2015.

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Report

Drafter

Due Date 2014 & 2015

Contributions: Reporting on expenditure of USG broadly earmarked contributions for the previous year. (Note: this report will rely on pre-audit figures, so will therefore be provisional.)

UNHCR

April 1

Health Update: A report on: 1) HIS data on all camps and in all countries where HIS is functioning disaggregated by site, and 2) an updated list of all nutrition surveys and mortality surveillance/surveys conducted by UNHCR and its partners.

UNHCR

February 1

Budget Forecast: UNHCR out-year budget forecasts

UNHCR

February 27

2013, 2014, and 2015 Performance Update: Annual report on Framework-related priority performance results for GAM, CMR, and durable solutions (listed on page 6, with targets as stated).

UNHCR

March 15, 2014 for 2013 data

March 15, 2015 for 2014 data

March 15, 2016 for 2015 data

2014 and 2015 Performance Update: Mid-biennium update on GSP results (as per Annex I) as well as GAM, <5 MR and durable solutions indicators (listed on page 6, with targets as stated). Final prior year results.

UNHCR

June 1, 2014 data (covers Jan.-May, 2014)

June 1, 2015 data (covers Jan.-May, 2015)

Framework Update: Briefing materials to support the mid-year Framework discussions structured according to the agenda for the framework talks.

UNHCR

June 15

COP Analysis: PRM feedback on UNHCR’s Annual Country Operations Planning Process.

U.S.

June 15

Framework Consultations Report: Joint report on mid-year Framework discussions.

Joint (U.S. to draft)

July 15

Health Update: A report on: 1) HIS data on all camps and in all countries where HIS is functioning disaggregated by site, and 2) a compilation of all nutrition surveys and mortality surveillance/surveys conducted by UNHCR and/or UNHCR’s partners.

UNHCR

July 15

Framework Update: Progress report in advance of end-of-year Framework discussions, structured according to the agenda for the framework talks.

UNHCR

November 30

Framework Consultations Report: Joint report on end-of-year Framework discussions.

Joint (HCR to draft)

January 15

IX. Conclusion

In closing, PRM and UNHCR confirm their commitment to remain strong partners to protect and find durable solutions for the millions of refugees, stateless persons, IDPs, and other persons of concern around the world. This Framework for Cooperation is intended to remain operative until December 31, 2015.

[signed]
Anne C. Richard
Assistant Secretary of State,
Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration
United States Department of State
Date:

[signed]
António Guterres
High Commissioner
United Nations Office of the Commissioner for Refugees
Date:

Annex I: UNHCR’s 2014-2015 Global Strategic Priorities

Operational GSPs for the 2014-2015 biennium

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IMPACT INDICATOR

GLOBAL ENGAGEMENT[3]

Favourable protection
environment

1. Ensuring access to territorial protection and asylum procedures; protection against refoulement;
and the adoption of nationality
laws that prevent and/or reduce statelessness

Extent law consistent with international standards relating to refugees

Seek improvement to national law in 82[4] countries, so as to be consistent with international standards concerning refugees and asylum seekers

Extent law and policy consistent with international standards relating to internal displacement

Seek improvement to national law and policy in 20 countries, so as to be consistent with international standards concerning IDPs

Extent law consistent with international standards on prevention of statelessness

Seek improvement in citizenship laws in 59 countries, so as to be consistent with international standards on the prevention of statelessness; seek to increase the percentage of stateless people who acquire or confirm nationality in 45 situations

Fair protection process and
documentation

2. Securing birth registration, profiling and individual documentation based on registration

% of children under 12 months old who have been issued with a birth certificate by the authorities

Seek increase in the systematic issuance of birth certificates to new-born children in 32 refugee situations

% of people of concern registered on an individual basis

Maintain or increase levels of individual registration in 83 refugee situations

Security from violence and
exploitation

3. Reducing protection risks faced by people of concern, in particular, discrimination, sexual and gender- based violence and specific risks faced by children

Extent known SGBV survivors receive appropriate support

Provide and seek improved provision of support to known SGBV survivors in 85 refugee operations

Provide and seek improved provision of support to known SGBV survivors in 14 situations where UNHCR is operationally involved with IDPs

Provide and seek improved provision of support to known SGBV survivors in 5returnee situations

Extent community is active in SGBV prevention and survivor-centred protection

Seek improved community involvement in prevention and protection of SGBV survivors in 16 refugee situations

Seek improved community involvement in prevention and protection of SGBV survivors in 8 situations where UNHCR is operationally involved with IDPs

Seek improved community involvement in prevention and protection of SGBV survivors in 2 returnee situations

% of unaccompanied and separated children for whom a Best Interest Determination process has been initiated or completed

Maintain or increase the proportion of unaccompanied or separated refugee children for whom a Best Interest Determination process has been completed or initiated in 57 refugee situations

Extent children of concern have non-discriminatory access to national child protection and social services

Seek increase in the non-discriminatory access to national child protection and social services in 11 refugee situations

Seek increase in the non-discriminatory access to national child protection and social services in 4 situations where UNHCR is operationally involved with IDPs

Seek increase in the non-discriminatory access to national child protection and social services in 3 returnee situations

Basic needs and services

4. Reducing mortality, morbidity
and malnutrition through multi-sectoral interventions

Prevalence of Global Acute Malnutrition (GAM)
(6-59 months)

Maintain UNHCR standards or reduce level of GAM in 32 situations where refugees live in camps or settlements

Under-5 mortality rate

Maintain UNHCR standards or reduce mortality levels of children under 5 years old in 37 situations where refugees live in camps or settlements

5. Meeting international standards in relation to shelter, domestic energy, water, sanitation and hygiene

% of households living in adequate dwellings

Maintain or increase the percentage of households living in adequate dwellings in 51 refugee situations

Maintain or increase the percentage of households living in adequate dwellings in 15 situations where UNHCR is operationally involved with IDPs

Maintain or increase the percentage of households living in adequate dwellings in 7 returnee situations

Average number of litres of potable water available per person per day

Maintain or increase the level of water supply in 50 refugee situations

Community empowerment and self-reliance

6. Promoting active participation in decision making of people of concern and building coexistence with hosting communities

% of active female participants in leadership/management structures

Seek improved participation of women in leadership/management structures in 52 refugee situations

Seek improved participation of women in leadership/management structures in 4 situations where UNHCR is operationally involved with IDPs

Extent local communities support continued presence of person of concern

Seek improvement in relations between people of concern and local communities in 20 refugee situations

7. Promoting human potential through increased opportunities for quality education and livelihoods support

% of people of concern (18-59 yrs.) with own business/self-employed for more than 12 months

Maintain or increase the percentage of people of concern who are supported to improve their business/self-employment opportunities in 33 operations

% of primary school-aged children enrolled in primary education

Seek improved enrolment rate of primary school-aged children in 111 refugee situations

Durable solutions

8. Expanding opportunities for durable solutions for people of concern, particularly those in protracted situations, including through strengthening the use of comprehensive approaches and contributing to sustainable reintegration, local settlement and successful resettlement in third countries

% of people of concern with intention to return who have returned voluntarily

Support refugees to return voluntarily in 58 situations where conditions permit

% of people of concern opting for local integration who have locally integrated

Support local integration in 47 refugee situations where conditions permit

% of people of concern submitted for resettlement who departed for resettlement

Seek to maintain or increase the percentage of people who depart for resettlement among those submitted, thereby supporting solutions in 71 situations


Support and management GSPs 2014-2015

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IMPACT INDICATOR

1. UNHCR's programmes are carried out in an environment of sound financial accountability and adequate oversight

Financial management at UNHCR headquarters and in the field is strengthened, and adequate internal control infrastructure is in place;

Accounts are recorded in full compliance with IPSAS, and UNHCR endeavours to benefit from it to the maximum extent.

Risk registers are operational at country level; risk management has been fully incorporated into management systems

2. UNHCR's operations deliver quality protection to people of concern and effectively advocate for their rights

Global protection capacity and response is strengthened through direct operational support and enhanced monitoring

3. Programme implementation is supported by timely, effective and predictable delivery of information and telecommunications services

Field operations have access to reliable, fast and secure information and communications technology networks and tools

4. UNHCR makes effective use of, and contributes to improving, humanitarian coordination mechanisms

Effective leadership is established for cluster and inter-agency coordination at global and operational levels

5. Results-based management (RBM) informs operational decision-making and resource allocation

Operational performance is monitored and analysed with a focus on results, and support is provided to the field for adoption of RBM

6. UNHCR effectively prepares for and responds to emergencies

Monitoring established and first delivery of relief occurs within three days from the onset of an emergency

Emergency deployment of staff, including those with appropriate leadership and management capacity, is predictable and timely

7. UNHCR has a diverse and gender-balanced workforce, which performs effectively

Overall gender balance is achieved

Staff members meet their learning needs

Assignments are made in an efficient and timely manner

Compliance is achieved in respect of performance reporting

Staff are committed and satisfied with their work

8. UNHCR mobilizes public, political, financial and operational support through effective strategic partnerships, inter-agency coordination, multimedia communication, targeted campaigns and fundraising strategies

Resource mobilization strategies are enhanced to increase funding towards UNHCR's budget

Partnerships with member States of the Executive Committee, UN agencies, NGOs and the humanitarian system are strengthened

Strategic external communication is strengthened through targeted multimedia campaigns and timely public updates

Information on operations is made accessible to external stakeholders in a transparent manner

Indicator Reference Sheets

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Indicator

5.1.2-5 Percentage of surveyed camps where the mortality rate of children under five does not exceed emergency thresholds.

Definitions

Surveyed camps are those camps hosting refugees in protracted situations that are provided with humanitarian assistance and for which data on the general health of the population (as measured by levels of malnutrition, sickness, or death) is tracked through routine monitoring systems such as the UNHCR Health Information System or Ministry of Health Information Systems.

Under-five mortality is defined as the death rate among refugee children under five (expressed as number of deaths per 1000 population per month).

Numerator: The number of surveyed protracted refugee sites receiving USG support as a response to a complex humanitarian crisis, for which data are available in which under-5 mortality does not exceed emergency thresholds.

Denominator: Total number of surveyed protracted refugee sites receiving USG support as a response to a complex humanitarian crisis, for which under-5 mortality data are available.

How to measure it: Divide the denominator by the numerator and multiply by 100 for a percent

New or Existing Indicator?

New indicator

Linkage to Long-Term Outcome or Impact

The under-5 mortality rate is a leading indicator of the level of child health and overall public health status of a refugee population. It is also a MDG indicator.

Indicator Type

Outcome

Unit of Measure

Unit of Measure: surveyed camps hosting refugees in protracted situations (reported as a percentage)

Use of Indicator

Reporting to bureau-level planners, Congress, nongovernmental stakeholders, in-country program managers, etc. for accountability of funds spent

Data Source and Reporting Frequency

Data Source: UNHCR

Reporting Frequency: Semi-annually (January and July)

Known Data Limitations

This indicator relies upon surveillance data. Unreliable population figures and a tendency to under-report deaths, particularly in the community, can lead to inaccurate reporting of the under-five mortality rate. In camps where the UNHCR HIS is not in place, the reliability and quality of reporting cannot be fully guaranteed.

Baseline Timeframe

2010

Disaggregate(s)

None

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Indicator

5.1.2-4 Percentage of surveyed camps where global acute malnutrition (GAM) does not exceed 10%

Definitions

Surveyed camps are those camps hosting refugees in protracted situations that are provided with humanitarian assistance and for which data on the general health of the population (as measured by levels of malnutrition, sickness, or death) is tracked through repeat surveys, including anthropometric surveys.

Global Acute Malnutrition (GAM) includes all malnourished children from 6 to 59 months of age with moderate or severe wasting, edema, or some combination of these conditions. GAM is defined as weight-for-height ratios less than two standard deviations below the mean (z-score < -2.0), or the presence of nutritional edema.

New or Existing Indicator?

New indicator (modified custom indicator – PRM)

Linkage to Long-Term Outcome or Impact

Nutritional status is a sensitive indicator for assessing the severity of a humanitarian crisis. In emergencies, nutritional status among children 6-59 months of age is used as a proxy indicator for the general health of the entire community or population of interest.

Indicator Type

Outcome

Unit of Measure/ How to Measure it

Unit of Measure: Surveyed camps hosting refugees in protracted situations

Numerator: The number of surveyed protracted refugee sites receiving USG support as a response to a complex humanitarian crisis for which data are available in which GAM does not exceed 10%.

Denominator: Total number of surveyed protracted refugee sites receiving USG support as a response to a complex humanitarian crisis for which GAM data are available.

How to measure it: Divide the denominator by the numerator and multiply by 100 for a percent

Use of Indicator

Reporting to bureau-level planners, Congress, nongovernmental stakeholders, in-country program managers, etc. for accountability

Data Source and Reporting Frequency

Data Source: UNHCR periodic health and nutritional data reports (derived from: nutrition survey reports; government, UNHCR, WFP, UNICEF and implementing NGO partners)

Reporting Frequency: Semi-annually (January and July)

Known Data Limitations

Limitations as to access and timing of anthropometric surveys, as well as confounding environmental/contextual factors may influence GAM rates.

Baseline Timeframe

2010

Disaggregate(s)

None

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Indicator

5.1.1-5 Percentage of the population of concern who have returned home or who have been resettled to a third country

Definitions

Population of concern is limited to refugees for repatriation/return, and refugees for resettlement.

A third country is a country other than a refugee’s country of origin or immediate country of first asylum that has provided protection to a refugee by offering resettlement.

New or Existing Indicator?

New: Revised custom indicator

Linkage to Long-Term Outcome or Impact

This indicator measures the extent of USG commitment and success in finding durable solutions for populations displaced as a result of persecution or, violence.

Indicator Type

Outcome

Unit of Measure

Unit of Measure: individual persons of concern (percent)

The composite indicator is constructed as follows:

Numerator: Number of refugees who have returned voluntarily and those who have departed for resettlement in the reporting period

Denominator: Total number of refugees with the intention to return and whose cases were submitted or resubmitted for resettlement during the reporting period

How to measure it: Divide by the numerator into the denominator and multiply by 100 for the percentage

Use of Indicator

Reporting to bureau-level planners, Congress, nongovernmental stakeholders, in-country program managers, etc. for accountability

Data Source and Reporting Frequency

Data Source: Protection monitoring systems, intention surveys, registration, voluntary repatriation forms (VRFs), ProGress database, IOM, refugee/IDP communities

Exceptionally, estimates based on reliable sources and field information may be used to arrive at figures for voluntary repatriation, since not all movements are assisted by UNHCR.

Reporting Frequency: Annual (provisional data to be provided in mid-March; final data in June)

Known Data Limitations

Neither component of the indicator – return or resettlement measures -- has a global coverage. Instead, data is collected by “situation” (a grouping of displaced populations for the purposes of operations programming). One country may include more than one situation.

In the case of repatriation, the data is limited to about 55 “situations” for which UNHCR has planned return activities. Data will be based on the total # of refugees who have expressed a will to return, and not on total refugee numbers.

In the case of resettlement, the data is limited to about 70 situations for which UNHCR has planned resettlement activities. Data will be based on the total # of submissions for resettlement, in order to capture the efficacy of UNHCR’s procedure. In most situations more individuals are identified for resettlement than actually submitted.

Also, the number of persons of concern who achieve a durable solution through voluntary return or resettlement is influenced by external factors including adequate funding of appeals, safe access, the number of crises and emergencies, the evolving policies of governments and availability of other durable solutions for displaced people.

Local integration, the third durable solution supported by UNHCR, as a process is difficult to measure in numerical terms, given the variety of legal and practical forms it can take. The indicator one could potentially use is the number of refugees who got naturalized during the reporting year. Unfortunately, this type of information is available for 15 to 20 countries only and dissemination of this data lies entirely within the control of states. As a consequence, the number of persons who have obtained a durable solution is under-reported.

Baseline Timeframe

Disaggregate(s)

Repatriation: % of persons of concern with intention to return who have returned voluntarily.

Resettlement: % of persons whose applications for resettlement have been submitted, who have departed for resettlement.



[1] Non-camp populations of concern refer to refugees or IDPs resident in rural or urban areas and generally benefit from different forms of UNHCR assistance and/or protection strategies than those refugees in established camps.

[2] Population of concern in this instance is limited to the number of refugees identified for repatriation/return plus the number of refugees submitted (or "identified") for resettlement in a given year. See Annex 2 for more information on these indicators.

[3] Global Engagements will be tracked on the basis of country-level baselines and targets as opposed to an aggregated global target. Reporting will therefore show global views of criticality and progress for the various GSP areas based on country level baselines, targets and results. These views will show broad levels of protection and achievement across UNHCR’s operations that cannot be sufficiently represented only in an aggregate result.

[4] UNHCR has grouped the operations pursuing work in the different GSP areas, using common indicators, to establish levels of Global Engagement. In other words, the Global Engagements are compilations of operations that have selected the specific GSPs and are using the same indicator to measure progress. The scope of each Engagement varies in line with the nature of challenges being addressed by UNHCR’s operations. Simply put, the number of operations that have selected a GSP objective and its corresponding indicator reflects the depth of UNHCR’s engagement across the world.