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Strategic Goal 11: Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs

Increase Understanding For American Values, Policies, and Initiatives to create a receptive international environment

Public Benefit

"Information and education are powerful forces in support of peace. Just as war begins in the
minds of men, so does peace." --
President Dwight D. Eisenhower

The exchange of information, persons, and ideas is fundamental to the foreign, economic and security policy of the United States. The Department relies upon public diplomacy and public affairs to understand, inform, engage, and influence foreign audiences by reaching out beyond government-to-government relations to establish a foundation of trust upon which specific policy and societal issues can be addressed in a context of informed understanding and mutual respect. The public is better served through the continuous dialogue that the Department's outreach efforts build with communities across America. Public diplomacy activities promote better appreciation of the United States abroad and greater receptivity for U.S. policies among foreign publics. Through public affairs programs, the Department also informs the American people of U.S. foreign policy and initiatives that have a direct impact on their lives. In a democratic society, it is imperative that the public understands the basis of Department policies carried out on their behalf.

The much discussed potential of public diplomacy to address anti-American sentiment is vitally important at a time when terrorism is such a worldwide threat and uncertainty is pervasive. In the struggle of ideas, public diplomacy is a critical component, a rapid and flexible capability for U.S. diplomacy abroad directed at improving understanding of and support for U.S. policy, encouraging and empowering moderates, and discrediting intolerance. For example, public diplomacy programs offer a fuller picture of how religious, ethnic, and cultural tolerance are keys to a peaceful and prosperous community of nations, and open access to information that provides alternatives to learning extremism.

Educational and cultural exchanges, international information programs, and public affairs activities reach current and future overseas opinion leaders, agenda setters, decision-makers, and the larger public. Rapport achieved through public diplomacy promotes relationships that provide for sustained U.S. access and influence in important sectors of foreign societies critical to achieving long-term international security and accelerating transitions to democracy. "'Right content, right format, right now' describes our strategic aim in seeing that U.S. policies are explained and placed in the proper context in the minds of foreign audiences." (Secretary of State Colin L. Powell)


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Performance Goal 1

Public Diplomacy Influences Global Public Opinion and Decision-Making Consistent With U.S. National Interests

Summary: Projected FY 2004 Performance

The Administration's National Security Strategy (NSS) states that the United States is in "a struggle of ideas and this is an area where America must excel in enlisting the international community...using effective public diplomacy to promote the free flow of information and ideas to kindle the hopes and aspirations of freedom...." To this end, the Department will lead the foreign affairs community to develop a coordinated national communication strategy so that all public diplomacy and public affairs activities promote a unified message.

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Examples of FY 2002 Achievements:
"The Network of Terrorism" --
This print and electronic pamphlet is now available in thirty-six languages. More than 1.3 million print copies are in circulation, making it one of the most widely read publications the Department has ever produced for international publics. Since Network was released on November 9, 2001, millions of people have read it on the web, in hard copy, and in the media throughout the world. International media have reprinted the publication and posted it on websites for an impressive multiplier effect.
ECA and US-Afghan Women's Council Partner for First Post-Taliban Visitor Project -- Fourteen women representing five Afghan government ministries and the Kabul Public Security Court participated in a month-long "U.S. Leadership Management and Computer Education" program. The project gave women working in the new Afghan government the opportunity to prepare to reenter the social, political and economic life of a liberated and reconstructed Afghanistan. Project goals included computer [computer what, training?], grant writing, and English language training. The project was tailored to the specific needs of the participants, taking into account their backgrounds and previous experience. The program also includes follow-up training with the expectation that participants will train others in their respective ministries.

Exchange programs will expose current, emerging and future leaders to U.S. values, ideas, language, and methodologies and open dialogue with them on important transnational and global issues. Professional exchange programs such as the International Visitor Program and Citizen Exchange Grants will bring decision-makers to the United States to meet with their counterparts to discuss combating terrorism, religious tolerance, journalistic freedom and other issues. Academic exchanges will engage scholars, teachers, student leaders, and policy-makers in the training of future generations. Success in influencing decision-making will include program participants who promote and implement positive change in their organizations as they assume increasingly senior positions of leadership in their home societies; it will also include improved global understanding of the values behind U.S. policy approaches, especially the encouragement and empowerment of moderation and discrediting of intolerance in societies at risk. Over forty current heads of state and senior cabinet officials are alumni of the Department's exchange programs.

International information programs will reach millions of people in their own language on themes and issues vital to American national interests with information and services such as the Department's international website (usinfo.state.gov—the primary source for information on U.S. policy and perspective), print publications and speakers and digital videoconferences. The Department encourages users to resuse and repackage programs to make them more effective in their cultural contexts. International information activities both respond rapidly to emerging crises and provide a long-term perspective. Success will be indicated by the relevant and timely delivery of authoritative and balanced information on U.S. opinion in context to overseas publics and opinion leaders.

Public affairs will expand its reach to foreign audiences, particularly those with large Muslim populations, by working with international journalists and broadcasters to produce TV Co-Ops that document American values, culture, issues, and life as well as cooperative television productions that focus on U.S.-led initiatives in developing countries and American generosity.

These activities will resonate well with local audiences because coverage is generated from the perspective of popular and credible news entities within each country. The Bureau of Public Affairs will acquire high quality commercial or public television programs for placement on foreign television stations and networks, or for educational and informational outreach purposes. This will result in increased programming and the expansion to larger audiences. In addition, the Department will continue to conduct thematic reporting tours for journalists and correspondents that do not maintain news bureaus.

Summary: Indicators, Results, and Targets

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Baseline

Results

Targets

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

Indicator #1: The Percentage of Participants who Initiate or Implement Change in Their Organization or Community Within Five years of Their Program Experience. (New Indicator)

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Baseline: 76%

Indicator #2: Level of International Public Understanding of U.S. Policies.

(New Indicator)

N/A

N/A

N/A

Baseline:

Evidence shows that information provided has reached intended user.

Evidence of individual action or institutional change parallel with U.S. interests

Indicator #3: Percentage Increase of Unique Users to Department's International Website and Listservs. (New Indicator)

N/A

N/A

N/A

Baseline:

A total of 120,000 unique weekly users, 8,000 subscribers to listserv.

Ten percent increase over 2003 baseline.

Indicator #4: The Level of Media Placement in Foreign Markets in Print, Broadcast and Radio. (New Indicator)

N/A

N/A

N/A

Baseline:

Evidence shows that information has reached intended user.

Evidence shows that information has reached intended user.

WGT:

Means and Strategies by Target

Within five years of their program experience, 76 percent of participants will initiate or implement change in their organization or community.

• Strengthen tracking of alumni through an accurate, comprehensive worldwide alumni database so that the Department can stay in touch with alumni.

• Increase staff working on alumni affairs.

• Provide alumni activities that focus on deepening knowledge and increasing skills in targeted thematic areas.

• Provide awareness and access of International Information Program (IIP) materials.

• Assess through program evaluations what types of activities alumni have most often engaged in to bring about change—be it introducing curriculum changes, publishing articles, drafting legislation, organizing advocacy campaigns—and develop alumni programming to encourage more recent alumni to undertake similar efforts.

• Assess obstacles to reform through program evaluations and develop support networks and activities for alumni facing obstacles in their reform efforts.

• Offer foreign program alumni opportunities to return for professional and educational development in the United States.

Increase the level of international public understanding of U.S. policies.

• Engage international publics about U.S. policies through publications, web-based media, digital videoconferencing, U.S. speakers, broadcast media, and reference services.

• Reach out to publics via websites and listservs.

• Pay comprehensive attention to important official texts, transcripts, fact sheets, by-liners, and other feature material in English, Arabic, French, Russian, Chinese, Spanish, and Farsi.

• Sustain worldwide advocacy through 170 IRCs and enrichment of Washington editorial projects.

• Sustain extensive personal interaction on the part of U.S. embassies and consulates worldwide.

• Work through alumni programming to provide accurate and balanced information to recently returned alumni regarding U.S. policies.

Increase unique users to Department international websites and listservs by ten percent.

• Publicize and promote resources more actively for unique users, defined as "a session from a specific computer system, with thirty minutes of inactivity causing a new session to be counted."

Increase the level of media placement in foreign markets in print, broadcast, and radio

• Utilize Department broadcasting studios and access to satellites to reach new media outlets and increase the number of television productions, news reports, video news releases, mini-documentaries, interactive dialogues and interviews with Department principals, and briefings for transmission on the American Embassy Television Network, as well as secondary broadcasting outlets.

• Increase the number of TV Co-Ops with foreign broadcasters from Muslim populated countries and third-world countries in Asia, South America, and Africa by working more closely with regional bureaus for identifying and pursuing joint funding support.

• Acquire educational and informational programming for dissemination to posts from multiple sources (Discovery, PBS, etc.) on subjects related to positive American values.

• Increase awareness of the scope of USG humanitarian and development programs through reverse co-ops in which joint television documentary stories are filmed and broadcast abroad.

• Utilize multiple language versioning to maximize the audience outreach of selected productions.

• Develop tracking mechanisms for monitoring placement of media products in foreign markets.

• Expand the use of digital video conferencing technology to widen the reach of its newsmaker briefings, linking posts in countries with no U.S-based journalists to allow their media to ask questions.

• Initiate a new service of thirty-second audio clips from major briefings, web-delivered for posts to market the material to local radio broadcasters and reporters for placement.

• Maximize efforts to reach Muslim countries through television, radio and print by the coordination of FPC, OBS, and RMO.


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Performance Goal 2

International Exchanges Increase Mutual Understanding And Build Trust Between Americans And People And Institutions Around The World

Summary: Projected FY 2004 Performance

During FY 2004, the Department will use exchange programs to build networks of informed opinion leaders in the national political, economic, and social infrastructures of foreign countries. Exchanges build the trust, confidence, and international cooperation with other countries that sustain and advance the full range of American national interests and provide foreign publics with a context for understanding American policies that might otherwise be misunderstood.

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Example of an FY 2002 Achievement:
Counterterrorism Projects Increase Understanding --
An evaluation of the International Visitor Program Special Initiative Projects showed that on a scale of 1 (not at all) to 5 (to a great extent), the program experience helped increase participant understanding the United States and its people and culture (4.32), U.S. democracy and its institutions (4.22), and the effect of September 11 on global security (4.31). One participant observed, "Everything in my life has now changed—my perspective on world views, culture, religion, conflicts, and how they are address has been enhanced. The study represents the views of 90 percent of the participants of 10 projects including 20 countries in the Near East, South Asia, Central Asia and the East Asia.

The Department will focus on high priority areas articulated in the NSS as non-negotiable demands for human dignity, the rule of law, limits on the absolute power of the state, free speech, freedom of worship, equal justice, respect for women, religious and ethnic tolerance, respect for private property, and the right to basic education, especially for women.

Exchanges go beyond the affirmation of these freedoms, and explain to and learn from key foreign participants how they are best secured and protected. The Department will work with government and university officials, educators and private sector specialists to institute a range of programs that will reach younger and wider audiences.

The Department will strive to increase participant levels by 26 percent with initiatives that include,

--Exchange programs for high school students from countries with significant Muslim populations,

--Partnerships For Learning, a commitment to sustained dialogue on education and opportunity, that emphasizes youth, education and leadership development and attacks the breeding ground and ideological bases for terrorism by applying academic and professional exchanges to convey American values, shatter stereotypes and address anti-American sentiment.

--Programs such as the Fulbright Program and Gilman Scholarships increase opportunities for U.S. citizens to experience other countries and cultures, and share that knowledge with decision-makers and the general public at home. Grant-based exchanges similarly increase the understanding and engagement of U.S. NGOs and local government.

--Sports programming, school-to-school Internet connectivity programs, teacher exchanges, and curricula consultants for foreign ministries of education.

--Widely expanded English teaching programs that not only meet worldwide demand for more English teaching, but also serve as effective means of communicating American values concerning civil society.

Success will come with increased numbers of participants -- both U.S. and foreign -- maintain or increased percentages of those participants who gain a better understanding of their host country and those who continue to communicate and collaborate with people encountered through their exchange experience. The adjacent chart shows that Department's FY 2004 goal is for 92 percent of exchange participants to increase understanding of their host country.

It is hoped that a greater number of individuals who have participated in exchange programs will ultimately attain positions of leadership in their societies - in government, business, academia, NGOs and the arts. Foreign participants in exchanges demonstrate a higher acceptance of democratic values, individual and human rights, and the rule of law. They are less suspicious of U.S. motives, show a greater desire to become leaders in their societies, and are less tolerant of their own government's anti-democratic actions.

Summary: Indicators, Results, and Targets

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Baseline

Results

Targets

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

Indicator #1: Percentage of Participants Who Increased Their Understanding of the Host Country Immediately After Their Program.

N/A

Baseline: 92%

91%

92%

92%

Indicator #2: Percentage of Participants who Remain in Contact with Host Country People Met on Their Program one Year or Longer After Their Program. (New Indicator)

N/A

Baseline: 76%

81%

75%

75%

Indicator #3: The Percentage of Participants Who Have Shared Information From Their Exchange Experience With Colleagues, Friends and Family Within One Year of Their Experience.

(New Indicator)

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Baseline: 85%

Means and Strategies

Immediately after their program, 78 percent of participants increase their understanding of the host country.

• During exchange programs, emphasize that the exchange experience is only the start, and that the real work of exchange—building trust and lasting relationships—comes after returning home.

• Provide information to potential program participants on new visa restrictions and border control reviews in the context of the U.S. public policy response to terrorist attack and threat and gain their active cooperation while implementing enhanced security for J-visa programs.

• Leverage private sector funds to increase the number of exchange participants.

One year or longer after their program, 75 percent of participants remain in contact with host country people encountered during their program.

• Develop alumni programming to encourage alumni to stay in contact with each other and the people they met on their program by means of websites, scheduled on-line chats, and professional and personal correspondence and collaboration.

Eighty-five percent of participants share information about their exchange experience with colleagues, friends and family.

• Make use of other program alumni (from crosscutting programs) to show newer alumni how they can creatively share their experiences with others.

• Develop leadership training for alumni to enable them to share their knowledge with their communities more effectively.


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Performance Goal 3

Basic Human Values Embraced by Americans Are Respected And Understood By Global Publics and Institutions

Summary: Projected FY 2004 Performance

The NSS observes, "Today, the distinction between domestic and foreign affairs is diminishing. In a globalized world, events beyond America's borders have a greater impact inside them" but "ultimately, the foundation of American strength is at home." The Department will use its public diplomacy and public affairs programs to dispel stereotypes and misconceptions about the United States, provide accurate and balanced information about American ideas, values, and beliefs, and build an international community that recognizes the "non-negotiable demands of human dignity." The Department will promote the best of what America is and has, but with a keen sensitivity to listening to and understanding the perceptions of those whom we would inform, engage and influence. By the end of FY 2004, the number of people who understand and respect universal human values identified with the United States will increase, mitigating the level of hostility directed toward the United States and Americans abroad.

Educational and cultural exchange programs can mobilize substantial domestic U.S. support for international engagement through partnerships with state and local governments, academia, businesses, and NGOs. To accurately portray American ideals and practices, exchange programs must maintain their nonpolitical character and must be balanced and representative of the diversity of American political, social, and cultural life. Academic and cultural programs must maintain their scholarly integrity and meet the highest standards of academic excellence and artistic achievement. Programs will provide an opportunity for foreign visitors to interact with Americans in different settings and on various topics including individual liberty and human rights and democratic practices. The success of exchanges will be gauged by the percentage of participants who express an understanding of these values in independent surveys and polls.

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Examples of FY 2002 Achievements:
Exhibit Demonstrates Common Experiences --
After the events of 9/11, Images from Ground Zero, a photographic art exhibit by Joel Meyerowitz, depicted the physical damage at the World Trade Center and the human drama of the recovery effort. Twenty-six ECA produced sets of the exhibit have been shown to millions of people in 135 cities in sixty countries. In Afghanistan, a female Afghanistan National Gallery of Art exhibit guide publicly observed: "I show people here the destruction in America and it shows we are not so different. We understand the tragedy in America because we lived with tragedy under the Taliban and through the years of war."
Shared Values: Opening a Dialogue -- In the fall of 2002, the first phase of the Shared Values Initiative was launched in Pakistan, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Kuwait and in pan-arab media. Five short-form mini-documentaries featuring American Muslims telling their stories in their own words were produced for television, radio and print in English, Arabic, Indonesian Malay, Urdu, and French. Simultaneously, the Department launched a comprehensive, multi-language and interactive website (www.opendialogue.org). The paid media effort reached over 288 million people, with earned media (press coverage) reaching countless more.
Information USA -- International Information Programs released the fifth annual addition of InfoUSA, an authoritative resource on CD-ROM and on-line for foreign users seeking information about U.S. policies and American society, culture, and political processes. U.S. embassies distribute 30,000 copies each year. The InfoUSA Web Site receives 7,000 hits a day.

The Department will work with the Smithsonian Institution and other organizations to develop interactive, multi-media exhibits called "American Corners," that provide access to reference materials on the United States.

These installations will be located in selected countries with significant Muslim populations and will provide a positive view of American society. A more modest version of this concept, "American Rooms," co-locates with a host country institution. Several American Rooms are now operating in Russia. In addition, the Department will use its capability to counter anti-Americanism with reasoned and focused messages. By the end of FY 2004, the number of individuals abroad willing to turn to U.S. sources for information and knowledge will increase.

In response to the war on terrorism and the need to answer the question of "why do they hate us", the Department's will continue its shared values campaign, specifically targeted at countries with significant Muslim populations. Through public relations efforts, the Department will reinforce the messages disseminated to targeted countries in the first wave of media flights in 2002 and work to close the value gaps in reaching out to moderate segments of the Muslim world. The Department proposes to conduct additional research, develop media products such as mini documentaries and, public service announcements, and with the placement of these media products in other Arab countries, conduct in-country public relations efforts. By FY 2004, the Department will reach a younger and more influential audience so that they can be advocates of shared values. In 2004, this program will expand the dialogue beyond the initial countries of Indonesia, Kuwait, Egypt, Lebanon, Jordan, Malaysia, Morocco, and Pakistan to other countries where informing, influencing, and engaging audiences is in the U.S. national interest.

Summary: Indicators, Results, and Targets

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Baseline

Results

Targets

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

Indicator #1: Percentage of Program Participants who Demonstrate an Affinity for Democratic Values Three or More Years After Their Program Experience. (New Indicator)

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Baseline: 65%

Indicator #2: Level of International Public Understanding of U.S. Policies.

(New Indicator)

N/A

N/A

N/A

Baseline: Evidence shows that information provided has reached intended user.

Evidence of individual action of institutional change parallel with U.S. interests.

Indicator #3: Targeted Publics Receive Intended Message (New Indicator)

N/A

N/A

N/A

Baseline:

Evidence shows that information has reached intended use.

Evidence shows that information provided has reached intended user.

Indicator #4: Percentage Increase of Unique Users to Department International Website and Listservs

N/A

N/A

N/A

Baseline:

120,000 unique weekly users, 8,000 subscribers to listserv

10% increase over 2003.


Means and Strategies by Target

Three or more years after their program experience, 65 percent of program participants demonstrate an affinity for democratic values.

• Structure programs that allow for discussion and observation of democratic values.

• Conduct qualitative and quantitative sampling and evaluation of program participants; refine programs as needed.

Increase the level of understanding of U.S. policies by international audiences.

• Engage international publics about U.S. policies through publications, web-based media, digital videoconferencing, U.S. Speakers, broadcast media, and reference services.

• Reach out via websites and listservs.

• Pay comprehensive attention to important official texts, transcripts, fact sheets, by-liners, and other feature materials in English, Arabic, French, Russian, Chinese, Spanish, and Farsi.

• Sustain worldwide advocacy through 170 IRCs and field amplification of printed and electronic materials produced in Washington.

• Sustain extensive personal interaction on the part of American embassies and consulates worldwide.

• Work through alumni programming to provide accurate and balanced information to recently returned alumni regarding U.S. policies.

Targeted audiences receive intended messages.

• Conduct qualitative and quantitative sampling through focus groups and data analysis.

• Develop media products and print collateral materials that reflect lessons learned and audience appeal from analysis; work with foreign government to place products.

• Conduct in-country public relations efforts that reinforce dissemination of materials.

Increase by 10 percent the number of unique users of Department international websites and listservs.

• Publicize and promote resources more actively for unique users, defined as "a session from a specific computer system, with thirty minutes of inactivity causing a new session to be counted."


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Performance Goal 4

American Understanding And Support For U.S. Foreign Policy, Development Programs, the Department Of State, and the U.S. Agency for International Development

Summary: Projected FY 2004 Performance

The Department strengthens the international relations of the United States by explaining Department activities to Americans, particularly how Department initiatives contribute to world stability. An informed public is a critical element in a dynamic and functioning democracy.

The Department will use a variety of methods to communicate its message and explain U.S. foreign policy to established and new audiences, and will continue to establish relationships with both domestic and international media outlets to broaden its reach. The Department will expand its regional satellite media tour program, which allows a Department principal to be interviewed consecutively by media outlets in several cities.

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Examples of FY 2002 Achievements:
Terrorism: A War Without Borders --
In a collaborative effort with the National Council for social studies, the Department's Office of the Historian launched the first in a series of videos that will be used to help students understand the connection between world events and their own lives. "Terrorism: A War Without Borders" is a brief overview of the history of terrorism and the global impact of terrorist acts. The curriculum package was provided to 12,00 educators. Feedback from surveys has been overwhelmingly positive.
Enhancement of the Department's www.state.gov Website--The Department's website, rated by Brown University's Center for Public Policy among the top seven federal websites and described as a "well-designed federal website," was enhanced through the addition of several features. The site received a new "look and feel" in FY 2002. Video/Audio presentation of daily press briefings were added, pages were revamped to provide a central focus for audio and video releases, email features were added, and the "message of the day" for current news was incorporated into the refreshed home page.

Through town hall meetings, conferences with NGOs, and intergovernmental groups, the Department will expand its outreach to ethnic groups, particularly Hispanic and Muslim communities, geographically dispersed around the country. Education programs will open more channels of communication with a younger audience through involvement with curriculum development, and the distribution of educational videos, developed through partnerships between the Department and various teacher associations. The Department will work toward the creation of the United States Diplomacy Center as a focal point where the general public can explore the pivotal U.S. role in world affairs. The museum will inform and educate visitors about U.S. diplomatic history and the operations of the Department.

Outreach through technology, primarily the Department's website, www.state.gov, will continue to be a dominant tool in the dissemination of Department messages. To reach the important and electronically savvy younger generation, the Department will launch before the end of FY 2003a new website specifically designed for students. The Department will continue to engage students through innovative means such as its annual web competition and print brochures that include crossword puzzles and other games. The Department will continue its major effort, supported by the Secretary, to provide updated information in the Background Notes series, the Department's single most popular publication. The Department will also expand its efforts using multiple delivery components for streaming and digital videoconferencing (DVC) to accompany electronic and print publications. To gather public feedback, the Department will continue to use the web survey developed for the general public and student sites.

The Office of the UnderSecretary for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs will move closer to meeting its legislative mandate to publish a national foreign policy record of each administration through the publication of the Foreign Relations of the United States (FRUS) series. Completion of additional FRUS series will ensure that the Department meets the objectives of the Advisory Committee on Historical Diplomatic Documentation, created by law to provide independent guidance and oversight of the FRUS series. By FY 2004, if appropriate resources are provided, the series will be publishing within thirty-five years of the events documented.

The degree of overall success will be assessed by the level of understanding of U.S. foreign policy by the American public as measured by research conducted on an ongoing basis through focus groups and national audience polling. This research will aid in developing communication tools and techniques to target specific messages that articulate U.S. foreign policy.

Summary: Indicators, Results, and Targets

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Baseline

Results

Targets

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

Indicator #1: Number of Interviews and Contacts With Media. (New Indicator)

N/A

N/A

N/A

Baseline:

16,000 contacts/year

16,000 contacts/ year

Indicator #2: Increase in Outreach to Targeted Audiences. (New Indicator)

N/A

N/A

Baseline:

Information provided has reached intended user.

Evidence shows that information provided has reached intended user.

Evidence shows that information provided has reached intended user

Indicator #3: Increase in "hits" on the Department's Website www.state.gov.

4 million hits per month

4.8 million hits
per month

4 million hits
per month

4.5 million hits
per month

5 million hits
per month

Indicator #4: Compliance With Legislative Mandate for Completion of FRUS [write out acronym] Volumes.

N/A

N/A

N/A

Baseline:

Make progress in meeting mandated compliance.

Make progress in meeting mandated compliance.

Means and Strategies By Target

Complete 16,000 interviews and contacts with media.

--Develop a national communication strategy (working on an interagency/Department basis) to formulate a coherent strategic plan to communicate U.S. foreign policy and political-military goals to the rest of the world.

--Increase the monthly number of its media satellite tours by Department Principals.

--Initiate monthly press outreach to student editors and local universities that have schools of public affairs.

--Increase outreach to ethnic groups in the United States, identifying and addressing policy matters of special interest.

--Increase the number of briefings by Department officials and USUN ambassadors with the Washington press corps.

--Streamline guidance processes for daily press briefing with training of Public Affairs Officers, and develop collaboration software.

Increase in outreach to targeted audiences.

--Expand the video lecture series, award program, DVCs, educational videos, and post pals in the Doors to Diplomacy program.

--Develop specific Hispanic, Arab, Asian, and Muslim outreach programs through websites, media, NGOs, and inter-governmental affairs.

--Complete a major capital campaign to raise private/public funding for the United States Diplomacy Center.

--Conduct focus groups, and qualitative/quantitative research for understanding message development.

Attain 4 million hits per month on the Department's website www.state.gov.

--Through web surveys, measure customer satisfaction with the Department's website; initiate changes based upon results.

--Implement a facelift of the website in coordination with IIP.

--Incorporate foreign-language versions to reach targeted audiences.

--Compliance with the legislative mandate for completion of FRUS volumes.

--Augment the staff of the Office of Historian with in-house and contractor staff to allow the Department to meet its requirement to complete full foreign policy records of Administrations within thirty years.

Summary: Verification/Validation and Crosscutting Activities

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Performance Goal 1

Public diplomacy influences global public opinion and decision-making consistent with U.S. national interests

Verification and Validation

When completed, the RESULTS database, will be the most comprehensive public diplomacy impact reporting database available to the Department.

Independent polling and targeted survey research.

Independent program evaluation.

Media placement tracking (PA).

Field reporting by posts (PA, IIP).

Listserv analysis and feedback on website effectiveness (IIP).

Older verification sources, including Project Tracker (database), Public Diplomacy Query (database), program reviews and evaluations, and IRC network site visits.

Crosscutting Activities

Partner with all regional bureaus, other functional bureaus; the Departments of Education, Justice, Defense, Treasury, Commerce, and Labor; USTR; the National Endowment for the Arts; the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Endowment for Democracy; Smithsonian Institution, other cabinet departments and independent agencies, academia and NGOs.


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Performance Goal 2

International exchanges increase mutual understanding and build trust between Americans and people and institutions around the world.

Verification and Validation

Grant reporting from program agencies using ECA/P-designed, standardized questionnaire/reporting templates.

ECA participant database.

Political, economic, public affairs and topical reporting from U.S. missions.

Exchange alumni activities and communications.

GPRA reports from field and domestic USG agencies.

Planned program evaluations conducted by independent evaluators using recognized and valid data collection methodology and scientifically valid sampling.

Quantitative measures based on increases in number of programs and participants are reliable and give an accurate measure of potential increased impact of ECA activities.

Qualitative measures combine rigorous measurement based on statistically valid survey research with ad hoc feedback from knowledgeable professionals on the quality of programs. Together they present a reliable picture of quality.

Crosscutting Activities

Partner with all regional bureaus, other functional bureaus; the Departments of Education, Justice, Defense, Treasury, Commerce, and Labor; USTR; the National Endowment for the Arts; the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Endowment for Democracy; Smithsonian Institution, other cabinet departments and independent agencies, academia and NGOs.

Performance Goal 3

Basic human values embraced by Americans are respected and understood by global publics and institutions.

Verification and Validation

• When completed, the RESULTS database, will be the most comprehensive public diplomacy impact reporting database available to the Department.

• Independent polling and targeted survey research.

• Focus groups, qualitative/quantitative sampling and audience pooling (PA).

• Field reporting by posts and NGOs.

• Listserv analysis and feedback on website effectiveness (IIP)

• Older verification sources, including Project Tracker (database), Public Diplomacy Query (database), program reviews and evaluations, and IRC network site visits

Crosscutting Activities

Partner with all regional bureaus, other functional bureaus, the Departments of Education, Justice, Defense, Treasury, Commerce, and Labor, USTR, National Endowment for the Arts, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Endowment for Democracy, Smithsonian Institution, and other cabinet Departments, independent agencies, academia, and NGOs.

Performance Goal 4

American understanding and support for U.S. foreign policy, development programs, the Department of State, and the U.S. Agency for International Development.

Verification and Validation

Website customer survey and data reports (PA)

Feedback reporting (PA)

Crosscutting Activities

The White House, the Department of Defense, NSA, regional and other functional bureaus.

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