Report
Bureau of International Organization Affairs
April 1, 2012


IV — GENERAL ASSEMBLY: IMPORTANT VOTES AND CONSENSUS ACTIONS

Public Law 101-246 calls for analysis and discussion of “votes on issues which directly affected United States interests and on which the United States lobbied extensively.” An important basis for identifying issues is their consistency with the State Department’s Strategic Goals. For the 66th UN General Assembly (UNGA) in 2011, 10 votes and nine consensus resolutions were identified for inclusion in this section.

Section IV contains four parts: (1) a listing and description of the 10 important UNGA votes; (2) a listing and description of the nine important UNGA consensus resolutions; (3) voting coincidence percentages with the United States on these important actions that were adopted by votes, arranged alphabetically by country (with each country’s overall coincidence rate from Section III listed alongside the rate for important votes).; and (4) voting coincidence percentages by UN regional groups and other important groups for nine of the 10 important votes.

IMPORTANT VOTES

The following 10 important votes are identified by title, resolution number, date of vote, and results (Yes-No-Abstain), with the U.S. vote noted. For each vote, a short description of the issue and U.S. policy considerations is provided. Where available, hyperlinks to additional explanatory material, as well as official U.S. statements, are provided. The resolutions are listed chronologically. Full texts of all resolutions can or will be found on the United Nations website, at: http://www.un.org/documents/resga.htm . In the left-hand column, all resolutions are listed numerically. Where underscored, resolution numbers are linked to their texts. (Some resolutions were not yet linked by the submission date of this report.)

1. U.S. Embargo of Cuba

A/Res/66/6 October 25 186-2(US)-3

The United States imposed a trade and financial transaction embargo on Cuba in 1960, because of Fidel Castro’s repressive policies and expropriation of U.S. property without compensation. The United States strengthened the embargo in 1962, 1992, and 1996. UNGA has adopted a resolution condemning this embargo every year since 1992.

Web Resources: Explanation of Vote by Ambassador Ronald Godard; UN news release

2. Terrorist Attacks on Internationally Protected Persons

A/Res/66/12 November 18 106(US)-9-40

This resolution deplored a plot to assassinate Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to the United States, and called on Iran to cooperate in bringing the culprits to justice. The Saudi-drafted text expressed “deep concern” at the plot, and encouraged member states to prevent the planning, financing, sponsorship, or organization of terrorist acts. Iran introduced four amendments, three of which would have removed all mention of that country from the text. All were rejected.

Web Resources: Statement by Secretary Hillary Rodham Clinton; Remarks by Ambassador Susan E. Rice (General Assembly); Remarks by Ambassador Susan E. Rice (media); UN news release

3. Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People

A/Res/66/14 November 30 115-8(US)-53

The General Assembly established the Committee in 1975 by Resolution 3376 (XXX); it renews its support annually.

Web Resources: Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People; UN news release

4. Division for Palestinian Rights of the Secretariat

A/Res/66/15 November 30 114-9(US)-54

The General Assembly established the Division for Palestinian Rights by Resolution 40B (XXXII) in 1977. It renews its support annually.

Web Resources: Division for Palestinian Rights of the Secretariat; UN news release

5. United actions toward total elimination of nuclear weapons

A/Res/66/45 December 2 169(US)-1-11

While the United States has made progress in many areas toward the goal of a world without nuclear weapons, it will require strengthening the global nonproliferation regime and addressing urgent nonproliferation challenges, including enhanced IAEA safeguards, cooperation to defeat proliferation networks, and improved security for vulnerable nuclear material. Progress on disarmament and nonproliferation is not an either-or proposition, but rather represents two aspects of the same goal. Only North Korea opposed this resolution.

Web Resources: Remarks by President Barack Obama; UN news release

6. Work of the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian People and Other Arabs of the Occupied Territories

A/Res/66/76 December 9 86-9(US)-75

The General Assembly established the Special Committee by Resolution 2443 (XXIII) in 1968. The United States believes that this committee embodies institutional discrimination against Israel, that it should be abolished, and actively lobbies other countries to withdraw their support for the annual resolution that renews the Committee’s mandate.

Web Resources: 2010 Human Rights Report: Israel and the occupied territories; UN news release; Special Committee [GA Resolution 2443 (XXIII)]

7. Report of the Human Rights Council

A/Res/66/136 December 19 122-3-59(US)

In joining the Human Rights Council, the United States expressed its willingness to support what the Council does well, but also pledged to challenge those aspects of the Council’s operation that undermine its effectiveness and mandate. The Report is a reflection of the Human Rights Council’s strengths and weaknesses. The United States abstained.

Web Resources: Human Rights Council; Explanation of Vote by Deputy Representative John F. Sammis; Fact Sheet: Key U.S. Accomplishments at the UN Human Rights Council; UN news release

8. Situation of Human Rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (D.P.R.K.)

A/Res/66/174 December 19 123(US)-16-51

The human rights situation remains grave in North Korea. The government controls almost all aspects of citizens' lives and refuses to allow international evaluation of human rights conditions.

The United States strongly supported this resolution as demonstrating the international community’s concern over the human rights situation in the D.P.R.K., the desire to hold the government accountable for its human rights violations, and to improve the situation of human rights there.

Web Resources: 2010 Human Rights Report: Democratic People's Republic of Korea; Statement by Ambassador Susan E. Rice; Testimony by Special Envoy Robert R. King; UN news release

9. Situation of Human Rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran

A/Res/66/175 December 19 89(US)-30-64

The international community remains deeply concerned over the deteriorating human rights situation in Iran, and the government’s failure to uphold its obligations under its own constitution and international human rights law. The world continues to bear witness to those in Iran who are trying to exercise their universal rights. This resolution signals that their voices are being heard.

Web Resources: 2010 Human Rights Report: Iran; Statement by Ambassador Susan E. Rice; Statement by Deputy Spokesperson Mark C. Toner; Announcement by Departments of the Treasury and State; UN news release

10. Situation of human rights in the Syrian Arab Republic

A/Res/66/176 December 19 133(US)-11-43

This resolution strongly condemned “continued grave and systematic” human rights violations in Syria, and called for an immediate end to all violence there. It called for Syrian authorities immediately to end to all such violations, to protect their population, and to comply fully with their obligations under international human rights law.

Web Resources: Statement by Ambassador Susan E. Rice; Remarks by Ambassador Rosemary A. DiCarlo; Statement by Ambassador Eileen Chamberlain Donahoe; HRC 18th special session on the human rights situation in the Syrian Arab Republic; UN Press Conference; UN news release

IMPORTANT CONSENSUS ACTIONS

The General Assembly approved the following resolutions by consensus. They have been chosen as representative of major U.S. policy goals. Though the first resolution was passed before UNGA 66, it is included because of its importance.

1. Suspension of the rights of membership of the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya in the Human Rights Council

A/RES/65/265 March 1

This resolution was the first ever where a standing member of the Human Rights Council was suspended for gross violations of human rights. The General Assembly suspended Libya’s vote and participation in the Council by consensus following the Qadaffi regime’s attacks against its own population that began in February. Following the seating of the new Libyan government, UNGA voted in November to restore Libya to the Council, 123(US)-4-6.

2. Report of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

A/Res/66/7 November 2

The resolution declared the IAEA’s role indispensable for encouragement and help in development of peaceful uses for atomic energy, for technology transfer to developing nations, and for nuclear safety, verification, and security.

Web Resources: Statement by Senior Advisor Donald A. Camp; International Atomic Energy Agency; IAEA Annual Report; UN news release

3. Measures to Eliminate International Terrorism

A/Res/66/105 December 9

The resolution strongly condemned all forms of terrorism — including “the atrocious and deliberate attacks that have occurred against UN offices in various parts of the world.” It called for implementing both the UN Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy and subsequent resolutions concerning the Strategy. It also urged efficient implementation of appropriate legal instruments and intensifying exchanges of terrorism-related information.

Web Resources: Statement by Public Delegate Mary B. DeRosa; Statement by Acting Legal Adviser Mark A. Simonoff; Remarks by Attorney General Eric Holder; UN news release

4. Women and political participation

A/Res/66/130 December 19

The resolution called for elimination of laws, regulations, and practices that discriminatorily prevent or restrict women’s participation in the political process. It also advocated enhancing women's political participation, accelerating the achievement of equality between sexes and, in all situations, promoting and protecting women's human rights.

Web Resources: Remarks by Secretary Hillary Rodham Clinton; Joint Declaration; Statement by Deputy Representative John F. Sammis; Statement by Counselor Courtney Nemroff; UN news release

5. Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women

A/Res/66/131 December 19

The resolution welcomed the report of the Secretary-General on the status of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, as well as the most recent reports of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women.

Web Resources: Statement by Adviser Laurie Shestack Phipps; UN news release

6. Follow-up to the Fourth World Conference on Women and full implementation of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action and the outcome of the 23rd Special Session of the General Assembly

A/Res/66/132 December 19

The resolution reaffirmed commitment to full, effective, and accelerated implementation of the Declaration and its Platform for Action. It called upon the UN Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN-Women) to continue to support gender mainstreaming across the UN system. It urged governments to increase funding to UN-Women by providing core, multi-year, predictable, stable, and sustainable voluntary contributions.

Web Resources: UN Women; Remarks by Ambassador Susan E. Rice; UN news release

7. Torture and other cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment or punishment

A/Res/66/150 December 19

The resolution called for implementing fully the absolute and irreducible prohibition of torture and other cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment or punishment. It condemned any action or attempt to legalize, authorize, or acquiesce in such treatment or punishment under any circumstances, including on national security grounds or through judicial decisions.

Web Resources: Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading treatment or punishment; UN news release

8. Elimination of all forms of intolerance and of discrimination based on religion or belief

A/Res/66/168 December 19

The resolution urged intensified efforts to promote and protect the right of freedom of thought, conscience, and religion or belief, and to eliminate all forms of hatred, intolerance, and discrimination because of religion or belief. It strongly condemned discrimination, hostility or violence by any means whatever, by advocating religious hatred.

Web Resources: Remarks by Secretary Hillary Rodham Clinton; Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Intolerance and of Discrimination Based on Religion or Belief; Explanation of Position by Deputy Representative John F. Sammis; UN news release

9. Implementation of Agenda 21, the Program for the Further Implementation of Agenda 21 and the outcomes of the World Summit on Sustainable Development

A/Res/66/197 December 22

The resolution set the UN Conference on Sustainable Development for June 20-22, 2012, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. It encouraged governments to involve and coordinate inputs from all appropriate national agencies. It expressed deep concern that funds were lacking for full participation either of representatives from developing countries or those from major groups. It urged timely provision of contributions, and requested the Secretary-General to use the limited funds efficiently, effectively, and transparently.

Web Resources: Statement by Advisor Rebecca Webber; UN Division for Sustainable Development; Rio+20 Conference; UN news release

10. Program Budget for the biennium 2012-2013

A/Res/66/248 December 24

The General Assembly approved a 2012-2013 program budget of $5.152 billion. This reflected a 4.9-percent decrease from the final 2010-2011 budget, and included reductions in cross-cutting areas such as conference services, publications, and other non-staff operational costs. It also reflected U.S. efforts in reforming the recosting process, whereby adjustments can be made to account for variances in factors including exchange rates and inflation, by deferring these costs until later in the biennium.

Web Resources: Statement by Ambassador Joseph M. Torsella; Fact Sheet; Remarks by Ambassador Susan E. Rice; UN news release

IMPORTANT VOTES: COMPARISON WITH UNITED STATES

The table that follows summarizes UN member state performance at the 66th General Assembly in comparison with the United States on nine of the 10 important votes. Resolution 136, on which the United States abstained, is omitted. This table shows what each member did for each of the nine votes. For comparison, each country’s overall coincidence rate with the United States is listed alongside the rate for the important votes.

The table is alphabetical by country. Each vote is listed by the number assigned to it below.

Key:
S = Same as U.S. Vote; O = Opposite of U.S. Vote; A = Abstained; X = Absent

1. Res. 6: U.S. Embargo of Cuba
2. Res. 12: Terrorist Attacks on Internationally Protected Persons
3. Res. 14: Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People
4. Res. 15: Division for Palestinian Rights of the Secretariat
5. Res. 45: United actions toward total elimination of nuclear weapons
6. Res. 76: Work of the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian People and Other Arabs of the Occupied Territories
7. Res. 174: Situation of Human Rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (D.P.R.K.)
8. Res. 175: Situation of Human Rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran
9. Res. 176: Situation of human rights in the Syrian Arab Republic


If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.

COUNTRY

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

COINCIDENCE:
IMPORTANT
VOTES ONLY

COINCIDENCE:
A
LL VOTES

Afghanistan

O

X

O

O

S

O

S

O

S

37.5%

44.4%

Albania

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

71.8%

Algeria

O

S

O

O

S

O

O

O

A

25.0%

30.9%

Andorra

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

70.8%

Angola

O

X

X

X

S

A

A

A

A

50.0%

44.1%

Antigua-Barbuda

O

A

O

O

S

O

S

A

S

42.9%

43.4%

Argentina

O

A

O

O

S

A

S

S

S

57.1%

48.7%

Armenia

O

O

O

A

S

O

A

O

A

16.7%

53.0%

Australia

O

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

88.9%

79.7%

Austria

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

69.4%

Azerbaijan

O

X

O

O

S

O

A

X

S

33.3%

42.7%

Bahamas

O

S

O

O

S

A

S

S

S

62.5%

47.5%

Bahrain

O

S

O

O

S

O

S

A

S

50.0%

39.4%

Bangladesh

O

A

O

O

S

O

A

O

A

16.7%

40.3%

Barbados

O

S

O

O

S

O

S

S

S

55.6%

47.6%

Belarus

O

X

O

O

S

O

O

O

O

12.5%

40.0%

Belgium

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

74.0%

Belize

O

S

O

O

S

O

S

S

S

55.6%

47.6%

Benin

O

A

O

O

S

A

S

A

S

50.0%

46.8%

Bhutan

O

A

O

O

S

O

S

A

A

33.3%

39.4%

Bolivia

O

O

O

O

S

O

A

O

A

14.3%

34.2%

Bosnia/Herzegovina

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

69.9%

Botswana

O

S

O

O

S

A

S

S

S

62.5%

48.7%

Brazil

O

A

O

O

A

O

S

A

S

33.3%

41.3%

Brunei Darussalam

O

A

O

O

S

O

A

O

A

16.7%

41.6%

Bulgaria

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

72.6%

Burkina Faso

O

X

O

O

S

A

A

A

S

40.0%

47.2%

Burundi

O

X

X

X

X

A

S

X

S

66.7%

14.8%

Cambodia

O

X

O

O

S

O

A

A

S

33.3%

38.4%

Cameroon

O

S

A

A

S

A

A

A

A

66.7%

56.6%

Canada

O

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

88.9%

91.4%

Cape Verde

O

X

O

O

S

X

S

S

S

57.1%

45.3%

Central African Rep.

O

S

X

X

X

X

S

S

S

80.0%

40.0%

Chad

O

S

O

O

S

X

A

A

A

40.0%

45.3%

Chile

O

A

O

O

S

O

S

S

S

50.0%

50.0%

China

O

A

O

O

A

O

A

O

A

0%

39.7%

Colombia

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

51.9%

Comoros

O

A

O

O

S

X

A

A

S

40.0%

40.3%

Congo

O

X

O

O

S

O

A

A

S

33.3%

41.1%

Costa Rica

O

S

O

O

S

A

S

S

S

62.5%

50.6%

Côte d’Ivoire

O

S

O

O

S

A

S

A

S

57.1%

51.3%

Croatia

O

S

X

X

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

75.0%

Cuba

O

O

O

O

A

O

O

O

O

0%

27.0%

Cyprus

O

S

O

O

S

A

S

S

S

62.5%

68.0%

Czech Republic

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

72.2%

DPR of Korea

O

O

O

O

O

O

O

O

O

0%

10.8%

Dem. Rep. Congo

O

X

X

X

X

X

A

A

X

0%

0%

Denmark

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

73.0%

Djibouti

O

S

O

O

S

O

S

A

A

42.9%

40.3%

Dominica

O

S

X

X

X

X

A

A

A

50.0%

10.5%

Dominican Republic

O

S

O

O

S

O

A

S

S

50.0%

45.6%

Ecuador

O

O

O

O

A

O

A

O

O

0%

29.3%

Egypt

O

S

O

O

S

O

O

A

S

37.5%

34.8%

El Salvador

O

S

O

O

S

A

S

S

S

62.5%

47.4%

Equatorial Guinea

O

X

O

O

X

X

X

X

X

0%

0%

Eritrea

O

X

O

O

S

X

S

X

X

40.0%

43.5%

Estonia

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

72.6%

Ethiopia

O

S

O

O

S

A

A

A

S

50.0%

47.4%

Fiji

O

S

O

A

S

A

S

A

A

60.0%

49.3%

Finland

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

71.8%

France

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

77.5%

Gabon

O

S

O

O

S

X

S

A

X

50.0%

60.0%

Gambia

O

A

O

O

X

X

S

S

A

40.0%

19.0%

Georgia

O

X

A

A

S

X

S

X

S

75.0%

78.8%

Germany

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

72.2%

Ghana

O

X

O

O

S

O

S

A

A

33.3%

45.2%

Greece

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

72.2%

Grenada

O

A

O

O

S

O

A

A

S

33.3%

43.8%

Guatemala

O

A

A

A

S

A

S

A

S

75.0%

48.1%

Guinea

O

A

O

O

S

O

A

A

S

33.3%

41.9%

Guinea-Bissau

O

X

O

O

S

O

S

A

S

42.9%

41.9%

Guyana

O

A

O

O

S

O

A

A

S

33.3%

41.9%

Haiti

O

S

O

O

S

A

S

S

S

62.5%

48.7%

Honduras

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

52.5%

Hungary

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

71.6%

Iceland

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

70.8%

India

O

A

O

O

A

O

A

O

A

0%

33.8%

Indonesia

O

A

O

O

S

O

A

A

S

33.3%

38.9%

Iran

O

O

O

O

A

O

O

O

O

0%

20.9%

Iraq

O

X

O

O

S

O

S

X

S

42.9%

39.4%

Ireland

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

69.9%

Israel

S

S

S

S

A

S

S

S

S

100.0%

92.8%

Italy

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

72.6%

Jamaica

O

S

O

O

S

O

S

A

S

50.0%

45.0%

Japan

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

70.8%

Jordan

O

S

O

O

S

O

S

A

S

50.0%

38.6%

Kazakhstan

O

A

O

O

S

O

S

O

S

37.5%

46.3%

Kenya

O

A

O

O

S

O

A

A

A

20.0%

40.8%

Kiribati

O

X

X

X

X

X

S

S

S

75.0%

75.0%

Kuwait

O

S

O

O

S

O

A

A

S

42.9%

34.8%

Kyrgyzstan

O

A

O

O

S

O

S

A

S

42.9%

45.9%

Laos

O

X

O

O

S

O

A

A

A

20.0%

31.8%

Latvia

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

72.6%

Lebanon

O

S

O

O

S

O

X

O

A

28.6%

35.7%

Lesotho

O

X

O

O

S

O

A

A

A

20.0%

39.2%

Liberia

O

S

O

O

S

O

S

S

S

55.6%

47.6%

Libya

X

X

O

O

S

O

S

S

S

57.1%

35.4%

Liechtenstein

O

A

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

80.0%

68.1%

Lithuania

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

72.6%

Luxembourg

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

71.6%

Madagascar

O

X

X

X

S

X

S

X

S

75.0%

48.6%

Malawi

O

X

X

X

S

O

S

S

S

66.7%

47.1%

Malaysia

O

S

O

O

S

O

A

A

A

33.3%

45.6%

Maldives

O

S

O

O

S

O

S

S

S

55.6%

49.4%

Mali

O

X

O

O

S

O

A

A

A

20.0%

42.1%

Malta

O

S

O

O

S

A

S

S

S

62.5%

67.6%

Marshall Islands

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

100.0%

89.6%

Mauritania

O

S

O

O

S

O

A

A

A

33.3%

39.7%

Mauritius

O

X

O

O

A

O

S

A

S

33.3%

42.3%

Mexico

O

S

O

O

S

A

S

S

S

62.5%

50.0%

Micronesia

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

100.0%

96.8%

Monaco

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

73.2%

Mongolia

O

S

X

X

S

A

X

A

S

75.0%

48.1%

Montenegro

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

70.8%

Morocco

O

S

O

O

S

O

S

A

S

50.0%

40.3%

Mozambique

O

X

O

O

S

O

A

A

A

20.0%

40.3%

Myanmar (Burma)

O

A

O

O

A

X

O

O

O

0%

35.6%

Namibia

O

X

O

O

S

O

A

X

X

20.0%

40.5%

Nauru

O

X

S

S

X

S

S

S

S

85.7%

95.5%

Nepal

O

A

O

O

S

O

A

A

A

20.0%

42.7%

Netherlands

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

72.6%

New Zealand

O

S

A

S

S

A

S

S

S

85.7%

68.0%

Nicaragua

O

O

O

O

S

O

A

O

O

12.5%

32.5%

Niger

O

A

X

X

S

X

A

A

A

50.0%

48.0%

Nigeria

O

A

O

O

S

X

A

A

S

40.0%

49.2%

Norway

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

70.8%

Oman

O

S

O

O

S

O

O

O

S

33.3%

33.8%

Pakistan

O

A

O

O

A

O

A

O

A

0%

22.8%

Palau

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

100.0%

97.3%

Panama

O

S

A

A

S

S

S

S

S

85.7%

62.2%

Papua New Guinea

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

48.6%

Paraguay

O

A

O

O

S

A

S

A

S

50.0%

44.7%

Peru

O

A

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

80.0%

50.0%

Philippines

O

S

O

O

S

A

S

A

A

50.0%

47.4%

Poland

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

72.6%

Portugal

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

71.6%

Qatar

O

S

O

O

S

O

A

O

S

37.5%

39.2%

Republic of Korea

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

70.0%

Republic of Moldova

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

72.2%

Romania

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

72.2%

Russia

O

A

A

A

S

A

O

O

A

25.0%

47.2%

Rwanda

O

S

X

X

X

X

S

S

S

80.0%

38.9%

St. Kitts and Nevis

O

S

O

O

S

X

A

A

A

40.0%

50.8%

Saint Lucia

O

S

O

O

S

O

S

S

S

55.6%

48.1%

St. Vincent/Grenadines

O

A

O

O

S

O

A

A

A

20.0%

41.3%

Samoa

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

57.6%

San Marino

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

70.8%

Sao Tome/Principe

O

X

X

O

S

X

S

S

S

66.7%

52.5%

Saudi Arabia

O

S

O

O

S

O

S

A

S

50.0%

37.7%

Senegal

O

S

O

O

S

O

A

S

S

50.0%

45.6%

Serbia

O

A

A

A

S

A

S

A

S

75.0%

64.2%

Seychelles

O

X

X

X

S

X

S

S

S

80.0%

57.1%

Sierra Leone

O

X

O

O

S

O

S

A

S

42.9%

44.0%

Singapore

O

A

O

O

S

O

A

A

A

20.0%

43.6%

Slovak Republic

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

73.0%

Slovenia

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

71.6%

Solomon Islands

O

S

O

O

S

O

S

S

S

55.6%

45.6%

Somalia

O

S

O

O

X

O

A

A

A

20.0%

3.3%

South Africa

O

A

O

O

X

O

A

A

A

0%

39.2%

South Sudan

O

S

X

X

X

X

S

S

S

80.0%

50.0%

Spain

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

71.6%

Sri Lanka

O

A

O

O

S

O

A

O

A

16.7%

41.0%

Sudan

O

S

O

O

S

O

O

O

S

33.3%

33.3%

Suriname

O

X

O

O

S

X

A

A

X

25.0%

46.0%

Swaziland

O

X

O

O

S

O

A

A

A

20.0%

37.8%

Sweden

X

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

100.0%

71.8%

Switzerland

O

A

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

80.0%

68.1%

Syria

O

X

O

O

A

O

O

O

O

0%

15.0%

Tajikistan

O

X

O

O

S

O

S

O

A

28.6%

43.1%

Thailand

O

A

O

O

S

A

S

A

S

50.0%

46.2%

TFYR Macedonia

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

72.2%

Timor-Leste

O

S

X

X

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

51.4%

Togo

O

X

O

O

S

O

S

A

S

42.9%

44.2%

Tonga

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

62.3%

Trinidad and Tobago

O

A

O

O

S

O

A

A

S

33.3%

43.1%

Tunisia

O

S

O

O

S

O

S

S

S

55.6%

39.4%

Turkey

O

S

O

O

S

O

S

X

S

50.0%

62.7%

Turkmenistan

O

A

O

O

S

O

A

O

A

16.7%

39.1%

Tuvalu

O

X

X

X

S

O

S

A

S

60.0%

48.3%

Uganda

O

S

O

O

S

O

A

A

A

33.3%

38.2%

Ukraine

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

66.7%

United Arab Emirates

O

S

O

O

S

O

S

A

S

50.0%

39.7%

United Kingdom

O

S

A

A

S

A

S

S

S

83.3%

79.7%

UR Tanzania

O

S

O

O

S

X

S

S

A

57.1%

51.4%

Uruguay

O

A

O

O

S

A

S

A

S

50.0%

46.8%

Uzbekistan

O

X

O

O

S

O

O

O

O

12.5%

36.2%

Vanuatu

O

S

O

O

S

A

S

S

S

62.5%

51.6%

Venezuela

O

O

O

O

S

O

O

O

O

11.1%

31.7%

Vietnam

O

A

O

O

S

O

O

O

A

14.3%

34.7%

Yemen

O

S

O

O

S

O

A

X

A

33.3%

35.8%

Zambia

O

O

O

O

S

O

A

A

A

16.7%

39.5%

Zimbabwe

O

X

O

O

S

O

O

O

O

12.5%

37.2%

Overall Percentage

52.9%

51.5%

Important Vote Totals: 192 Countries, 9 Resolutions: A [394] + X [127] = 521. S = 639 O = 568