Report
Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs

Argentina

Budget Summary ($000)

If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.

FY 2010 Actual

FY 2011 Estimate

FY 2012 Request

300

300

400

Program Overview

Argentina is a transshipment route for trafficking of Andean-produced cocaine to Europe and other markets. Due to its advanced chemical production facilities, it is also one of South America’s largest producers of precursor chemicals. Argentina became a significant transit country for ephedrine bound for Mexico and the United States three years ago. While the Government of Argentina (GOA) banned importation of ephedrine by pharmacies in 2008, trafficking of this substance remains a problem. The Argentina program advances efforts to combat rising Bolivian-origin cocaine trafficking and illicit precursor chemical exports.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Argentina program supports the FY 2012 Mission Strategic and Resource Plan priorities to empower the host government to become a more effective partner in fighting criminal networks. The program also supports INL’s FY 2012 Bureau Strategic and Resource Plan goals of Transnational Crime, Counternarcotics, and Criminal Justice Sector Capacity Building and Security Sector Reform (SSR).

Objective 1: Augment the host government capacity to deter, investigate, prosecute, and reduce the threat of organized crime, particularly in counternarcotics, and disrupt or dismantle targeted organizations involved in the drug trade.

Objective 2: Heighten GOA vigilance against traffic in Andean-origin cocaine and precursor chemicals including ephedrine.

Objective 3: Enhance the legal framework for control of precursor chemicals and forfeiture processing for assets seized from individuals or criminal organizations engaged in illicit activities, including drug trafficking.

Objective 4: Increase awareness of problems associated with drug addiction, particularly the cheap cocaine derivative “paco.”

Objective 5: Enhance the capabilities of law enforcement officials to make investigations of intellectual property violations more efficient and effective.

FY 2012 Program

Counternarcotics

Law Enforcement Support: This project provides training and equipment for host-nation law enforcement to enhance their investigative and operational capabilities, including such items as computers and narcotics detection equipment. It will also support the Northern Border Task Force, as well as the Eastern Border Task Force (EBTF), which combine efforts of the Investigative Police, Coast Guard, Customs, and other regional law enforcement bodies into a unified task force to combat narcotics trafficking in Argentina’s northeast region, including its tri-border area (TBA) with Paraguay and Brazil.

Demand Reduction: Funds will support drug demand and treatment programs and a more effective campaign to increase drug awareness and deter youth from abusing drugs.

Intellectual Property Rights (IPR): This project will help improve key aspects of IPR protection by hosting seminars and training that address issues such as Argentina’s failure to enforce copyrights and trademarks and adequately protect pharmaceutical data against unfair commercial use.

Transnational Crime

Judicial Reform Project: This project will fund activities that encourage specific legal and institutional reforms, including regulation of drug precursor chemicals and rules for disposing seized criminal assets. Support will include training and seminars focused on drafting new regulations related to the aforementioned topics.


If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.
If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.

Argentina

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2010

FY 2011

FY 2012

Actual

Estimate

Request

1.4 Counternarcotics

Law Enforcement Support

230

180

200

Demand Reduction

0

62

50

Intellectual Property Rights

0

40

10

Program Development & Support (objective 6.2 attributed to 1.4)

30

18

30

1.4 Subtotal

260

300

290

1.5 Transnational Crime

Judicial Reform

40

0

100

Program Development & Support (objective 6.2 attributed to 1.5)

0

0

10

1.5 Subtotal

40

0

110

Total

300

300

400


Bolivia

Budget Summary ($000)

If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.

FY 2010 Actual

FY 2011 Estimate

FY 2012 Request

20,000

15,000

10,000

Program Overview

Bolivia is the world's third largest producer of cocaine and a major transit country for Peruvian-origin cocaine. In recent years, interdiction and eradication results have diminished as a result of the Government of Bolivia’s (GOB) policies and actions, including the expulsion of the DEA in January 2009. Still, GOB officials recognize the growing threat posed by drug traffickers and Bolivia’s pivotal role in the illicit drug industry requires continued U.S. engagement. The U.S. remains committed to working with the GOB to improve counternarcotics and justice sector results. INL will continue the transition of counternarcotics costs associated with interdiction and eradication to the GOB, as part of a regional nationalization strategy. As part of this transition, funds will be used to transition offices and personnel as the program shifts focus towards nationalization. Assistance will also help build the capacity of Bolivian law enforcement and criminal justice system actors to combat the corrosive effects of transnational crime.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Bolivia program supports the host government’s efforts to combat transnational crime. The program also supports the embassy’s FY 2012 Mission Strategic and Resource Plan goals of refocusing the GOB on disrupting crime, drug trafficking, reducing coca cultivation and orienting security forces to operate in accordance with constitutional rule of law and international norms, as well as INL’s FY 2012 Bureau Strategic and Resource Plan goals related to Counternarcotics, Transnational Crime, and Criminal Justice Sector Capacity Building and Security Sector Reform (SSR).

Objective 1: Build institutional capability to interdict and eradicate narcotics and precursors produced within or transiting through Bolivia.

Objective 2: Enhance the capabilities of law enforcement to conduct criminal and financial investigations that will result in arrests and prosecutions of trafficking organizations.

Objective 3: Increase institutional capability to identify, prevent, and prosecute cases of transnational crime, including trafficking in persons.

FY 2012 Program

Counternarcotics

Interdiction: Funds will provide logistical support to the GOB and assist the transition of interdiction costs to the GOB. This will include support such as field equipment and maintenance costs to the Bolivian National Police’s Counternarcotics Division (FELCN), its command staff and rural patrol units (UMOPAR), a canine drug detection unit (K-9), and the Special Operations Force (FOE). The FOE includes an economic and financial investigations unit (GIAEF), a special intelligence and operations group (GIOE), and a precursor chemical investigations unit (GISUQ). Funds will assist the counternarcotics prosecutors and Garras del Valor training school with administrative and logistical support such as travel and per diem costs. The program will also provide support for operating costs (INFRA). Funds may provide limited support for the transition of ground transport (Green Devils Task Force), a riverine unit (Blue Devils Task Force), and fixed-wing (Black Devils Task Force) and rotary-wing aviation (Red Devils Task Force) to conduct interdiction operations.

Law Enforcement Capacity Building: Funds will support efforts to build law enforcement capacity though training and development, including investigative skills, forensic sciences, human rights, and trafficking-in-persons. Funds will provide for infrastructure and logistical costs, such as travel, supplies, and basic equipment, as well as costs for support staff, trafficking-in-persons unit incentives, and victims’ assistance.

Demand Reduction: Funds will advance demand reduction, prevention, and treatment efforts through technical assistance, logistical support, equipment and workshop materials, and other assistance. The program will include grants to local non-governmental organizations to provide drug abuse prevention and rehabilitation programs in addition to youth drug abuse prevention programs, such as soccer leagues and Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) programs.


If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.
If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.

Bolivia

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2010

FY 2011

FY 2012

Actual

Estimate

Request

1.4 Counternarcotics

Interdiction

Program Support

3,765

2,450

1,500

Operational/Logistics Support

3,055

1,800

1,500

Aviation Support

1,450

900

0

Eradication

Program Support

4,300

2,850

0

Operational/Logistics Support

1,210

900

0

Aviation Support

1,420

900

0

Law Enforcement Capacity Building

600

1,000

1,413

Demand Reduction

0

0

600

Program Development & Support (objective 6.2 attributed to 1.4)

4,200

4,200

4,987

1.4 Subtotal

20,000

15,000

10,000

Total

20,000

15,000

10,000


Brazil

Budget Summary ($000)

If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.

FY 2010 Actual

FY 2011 Estimate

FY 2012 Request

1,000

1,000

4,000

Program Overview

Brazil is a major transit country for cocaine and other illicit drugs destined for Europe, and to a lesser extent, the United States. Despite excellent cooperation with its neighbors, Brazil’s expansive territory and uncontrolled borders make effective narcotics enforcement very difficult. Increasing amounts of drugs, particularly from Bolivia, are being diverted to Brazilian urban centers, and Brazil has become the second-largest consumer of cocaine in the world after the United States. Brazil has a large and sophisticated financial sector and is increasingly becoming a regional center for money laundering and other financial crimes. Brazil’s domestic drug trade is primarily controlled by powerful, heavily-armed and well-organized urban gangs that use part of their illicit profits to procure weapons and sophisticated communications devices that give them an increased advantage over already outnumbered and ill-equipped municipal and state police. These gangs have growing ties to known international traffickers and are involved in other international criminal activities, which could have a direct impact on the security of the United States. By assisting Brazil in improving its law enforcement capabilities, the USG will help reduce the flow of illegal drugs, disrupt the activities of known international narcotics traffickers, and deny criminals their illicit profits.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Brazil program supports the embassy’s FY 2012 Mission Strategic and Resource Plan priority of working to ensure that Brazil’s law enforcement and justice system are integrated, synchronized, and effective in disrupting national and transnational crime, and supports INL’s FY 2012 Bureau Strategic and Resource Plan goals of Transnational Crime, Counternarcotics, and Criminal Justice Sector Capacity Building and Security Sector Reform (SSR).

Objective 1: Enhance Brazil’s capability to dismantle and/or disrupt major drug trafficking organizations that operate in and/or through Brazil and have criminal ties to the United States.

Objective 2: Enhance Brazil’s ability to participate in bilateral and multilateral investigations against drug trafficking organizations.

Objective 3: Enhance Brazil’s law enforcement capability to improve its port and airport security.

FY 2012 Program

For the past several years, Brazil had a substantial budget pipeline, which will be exhausted by the end of FY 2011. The FY 2012 request for Brazil brings the program to the spending level required to both sustain ongoing programs and support new security initiatives for major events training for the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics. Funds will also go toward enhanced support to help the Brazilian prison system improve its security and intelligence capabilities in dealing with drug-dealing gangs.

Counternarcotics

Funds will support narcotics interdiction programs and enhance the Government of Brazil’s (GOB) law enforcement efforts.

Funds will provide continued training and equipment for the GOB’s intelligence-based interdiction efforts at seaports, international airports, and at strategic major transit points.

Through our Law Enforcement Training and Urban Crime programs, funding will also support President Obama’s commitment to “cooperate to ensure security during major events” and augment training for Brazilian law enforcement for the World Cup which will be conducted in 12 locations throughout the country, and the Olympics.

Additionally, funds will further Brazil’s demand reduction initiatives and support prison reform for the second-largest prison system in the Western Hemisphere.

Transnational Crime

Funds will support projects to combat money laundering and other financial crimes.


If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.
If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.

Brazil

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2010

FY 2011

FY 2012

Actual

Estimate

Request

1.4 Counternarcotics

Law Enforcement Training

0

0

100

Special Investigation Units

0

0

200

Airport Interdiction

200

0

800

Canine

0

0

100

Urban Crime Program

0

200

1,500

Demand Reduction

0

0

280

Program Development & Support (objective 6.2 attributed to 1.4)

800

800

920

1.4 Subtotal

1,000

1,000

3,900

1.5 Transnational Crime

Anti-Money Laundering

0

0

100

Program Development & Support (objective 6.2 attributed to 1.5)

0

0

0

1.5 Subtotal

0

0

100

Total

1,000

1,000

4,000


Chile

Budget Summary ($000)

If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.

FY 2010 Actual

FY 2011 Estimate

FY 2012 Request

-

-

100

Program Overview

Chile's porous borders with Peru and Bolivia, more than 20 ports, and more than 50 free trade agreements with North America, Europe, and Asia increase its vulnerability to drug trafficking. Chile is a source of essential chemicals used in cocaine processing in Peru, Colombia, and Bolivia, and the chemical precursor ephedrine, used in the manufacturing of methamphetamine. In April 2010, a cocaine HCl home-based manufacturing lab was discovered in a region near the capital. INCLE funds allow us to maintain law enforcement relationships that deliver results with Chile’s capable law enforcement agencies. Over the past year, the U.S. and Chile have entered into a dialogue to increase cooperation on a variety of law enforcement initiatives. This strong relationship will continue to be reinforced in the coming years. Maintaining a well-equipped and capable partner that is willing to assist other nations in South America is a tremendous asset to U.S. counternarcotics work in the region.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Chile program supports the embassy’s FY 2012 Mission Strategic and Resource Plan priority of Partnership in Security, and INL’s FY 2012 Bureau Strategic and Resource Plan goals of Transnational Crime, Counternarcotics, and Criminal Justice Sector Capacity Building and Security Sector Reform (SSR).

Objective 1: Increase the capacity of host government law enforcement entities to interdict narcotics and chemical precursors.

Objective 2: Support Chilean efforts to reduce domestic consumption of illegal narcotics.

FY 2012 Program

Counternarcotics

Funds will include advanced law enforcement training, particularly related to precursor identification and interdiction. Support will also include demand reduction activities to reduce domestic consumption.


If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.
If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.

Chile

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2010

FY 2011

FY 2012

Actual

Estimate

Request

1.4 Counternarcotics

Demand Reduction

0

0

20

Interdiction

0

0

76

Program Development & Support (objective 6.2 attributed to 1.4)

0

0

4

1.4 Subtotal

0

0

100

Total

0

0

100


Colombia

Budget Summary ($000)

If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.

FY 2010 Actual

FY 2011 Estimate

FY 2012 Request

243,900

204,000

160,600

Program Overview

After achieving notable results in improving security, disrupting the drug trade and expanding a government presence throughout the country, Colombia is now working to consolidate this progress and share its expertise with others in the region. The Colombian National Police (CNP) is our closest partner in promoting citizen security throughout the region and elsewhere in the world. Since 2009, the CNP has trained approximately 9,000 police from Latin America and West Africa in areas such as criminal investigation skills, rural commando skills, VIP protection, intelligence/counter-intelligence, anti-kidnapping/anti-extortion, and canine programs.

To help the Colombian Government implement their National Consolidation Plan, the United States will continue to provide assistance to support Colombian-led interdiction and eradication programs. U.S. programs will also enhance the CNP’s capability to maintain a security presence in former conflict and drug trafficking regions, while also expanding access to state institutions and services in these regions. FY 2012 funds will also be used to promote and expand local drug prevention programs and encourage the demobilization of illegal, armed combatants.

Program Goals and Objectives

U.S. counternarcotics and rule of law assistance supports the Government of Colombia’s (GOC) broad programs that help keep several hundred metric tons of cocaine and heroin from reaching the United States. The U.S. is increasingly focusing its resources to support Colombia’s National Consolidation Plan, which calls for concentrated efforts to expand state presence and services in targeted geographic areas where poverty, violence, and illicit crop cultivation or narcotics trafficking have historically converged. Our programs address several priority consolidation zones, i.e., areas where insecurity, drug cultivation and trafficking and a lack of alternative development remain impediments to democratic development. Within these priority areas, counternarcotics programs are being closely sequenced with expanding state presence and alternative development to promote more permanent eradication results.

Objective 1: Continue to support Colombia’s increasing capacity to combat the drug trade through counternarcotics programs closely coordinated with alternative development.

Objective 2: Assist the GOC in expanding security and justice in remote and former conflict regions.

Objective 3: Improve the capability of Colombia’s Attorney General’s Office, particularly its Human Rights and Justice and Peace Units.

Objective 4: Enhance cooperation with Colombia to promote regional training and coordination on counternarcotics and citizen safety initiatives.

FY 2012 Program

Stabilization Operations and Security Sector Reform

Attorney General’s Office

Funding will support training, including that provided by the U.S. Marshals Service, for Colombian agencies that provide protection at Colombia’s courts and protect witnesses, prosecutors and judges.

Reestablishing Rural Police

Expanding the government’s ability to secure former conflict regions is fundamental to achieving more lasting eradication and promoting human rights and citizen security. Funding will support increases in the number of trained and equipped rural police and provide weapons, ammunition and transportation.

Individual Deserter Program

U.S. assistance will provide for the continued support of subject matter expertise to bolster the Colombian Ministry of Defense’s demobilization program. A team of U.S.-supported advisors offers tailored demobilization and prevention of illegal recruitment strategies, as well as advanced database management tools.

Strategic Initiative – Rule of Law

Colombia’s police and judicial system are confronting multiple security challenges, both in urban and rural settings, which go beyond traditional counternarcotics and rule of law programs. In concert with Colombia’s comprehensive strategy to combat the emergent “bandas criminales” (BACRIM), this program will enhance capacity in both Colombia’s police and justice system to address this disparate threat by supporting some of the new anti-BACRIM units being created in Colombia’s security forces and Prosecutor General’s Office. Assistance will consist of training and specialized equipment, such as communication and intelligence support. Funds will also be used to support Colombia’s National Consolidation Plan, particularly efforts to increase access to justice in consolidation zones.

Counternarcotics

Colombian Military

Navy Maritime Interdiction: Further expands the Colombian Coast Guard’s presence throughout the Pacific coast where a majority of the drugs destined for the Unites States depart. The USG will support limited infrastructure and base construction off of Colombia’s Pacific coastline, purchase equipment and weapons for Coast Guard personnel and support maritime interdiction training. Some funds will also be used to support similar Colombian Navy programs along their Caribbean coast.

Colombian National Police (CNP)

CNP Aviation Support: Supports an aviation contract that provides mechanics, a small number of pilots to oversee Colombian pilots, and supplies aviation parts and training. This enables CNP Aviation to provide important support for a range of counternarcotics activities, including security for aerial eradication, transport for manual eradication personnel, interdiction missions and high-value target operations.

CNP Eradication: Aerial eradication is an important tool in consolidation efforts. It allows the Colombian government to eradicate areas that are not safe for manual eradication and can more quickly target large coca growing areas. Funding under this line supports the Colombian National Police with an aviation contract that supplies spray pilots, parts, and logistics for up to 12 AT-802 spray planes and two Cessna 208 imagery gathering aircraft. Sustained aerial and manual eradication operations in 2009 are credited with a 3 percent reduction in coca cultivation compared to 2008, from 119,000 to 116,000 hectares, as well as a decline in pure cocaine production potential of 3.5 percent, from 280 metric tons (MT) in 2008 to 270 MT in 2009 - a 61 percent drop from the 700 MT estimated production potential in 2001. We are working closely with the Colombian government to nationalize components of this program, including purchasing of the glyphosate used in aerial eradication and building a cadre of Colombian mechanics for the AT-802s.

CNP Interdiction: Trains and equips specialized CNP interdiction units. Supports interdiction programs at Colombia’s ports and airports, including purchasing scanning equipment and providing training to the CNP. Enhances security and capacity at rural CNP stations in consolidation areas through security training and infrastructure upgrades.

Establishing Rural Police Presence: Funding will also provide training, weapons and mine detection equipment to rural police/Carabineros that provide protection for manual eradicators.

Drug Demand Prevention

U.S. support will help strengthen local anti-drug community organizations, as well as expand the CNP’s Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) program.

Rule of Law and Human Rights

Attorney General’s Office

Assisting the GOC in investigating and prosecuting human rights cases is a U.S. government priority. Increasing the administrative capability of the Colombian Prosecutor General’s Office, along with building capacity within this office’s Human Rights and Justice and Peace units, will be focal points of funding under this account.

Justice Sector Reform Program

Provide training and equipment for the expansion of criminal justice operations and activities into consolidation areas by enhancing the work of the Fiscalia’s regional offices and judicial training for government officials in these regions. Support for training in the new accusatory system and criminal code will continue.


If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.
If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.

Colombia

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2010

FY 2011

FY 2012

1.3 Stabilization Operations and Security Sector Reform

Actual

Estimate

Request

Attorney General's Office

5,750

4,500

4,500

Judicial Reform Program

2,000

2,750

1,000

Establishing Rural Police Presence

2,000

3,500

4,500

Individual Deserter Program

500

500

750

Human Rights

2,000

-

-

Procuraduria General

200

-

-

Defensoria del Pueblo

500

-

-

1.3 Subtotal

12,950

11,250

15,750

1.4 Counternarcotics

Support to the Colombia Military

Army Counterdrug Mobile Brigade

2,000

500

-

Army Aviation Support

35,000

20,000

-

Air Bridge Denial Program

1,000

1,000

-

Navy Maritime Interdiction Support

5,000

5,000

8,000

Support to the Colombian National Police

Aviation Support

50,000

52,000

51,650

Support for Eradication

53,000

51,250

48,000

Support for Interdiction

25,000

16,000

14,000

Reestablish Rural Police

1,000

1,500

1,500

Demand Reduction

500

500

500

Critical Flight Safety Program

20,950

17,300

Program Development & Support (objective 6.2 attributed to 1.4)

6,700

6,700

6,700

1.4 Subtotal

200,150

171,750

130,350

1.5 Transnational Crime

Money Laundering

750

-

-

1.5 Subtotal

750

0

0

2.1 Rule of Law and Human Rights

DOJ Attorney General's Office

14,250

11,500

10,500

DOJ Justice Sector Reform

6,000

3,000

4,000

USAID Human Rights

6,000

2,500

-

USAID Inspector General

2,800

1,000

-

USAID Ombudsman

-

1,000

-

USAID Public Defender

500

-

-

USAID UNHCHR

500

500

-

USAID Human Rights Fund

-

500

-

USAID Rule of Law Partnership

-

1,000

-

2.1 Subtotal

30,050

21,000

14,500

Total

243,900

204,000

160,600


Ecuador

Budget Summary ($000)

If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.

FY 2010 Actual

FY 2011 Estimate

FY 2012 Request

4,500

4,500

7,700

Program Overview

Ecuador is a major transit country for illicit drugs trafficked from Colombia and Peru to the United States, as well as a source of chemical precursors diverted for illicit narcotics manufacturing. Transit of illicit drugs is a major concern; therefore, the preponderance of U.S. counternarcotics assistance for Ecuador targets interdiction efforts. Counternarcotics cooperation continues to be one of the strongest pillars of the U.S. bilateral relationship with Ecuador. The U.S. remains committed to help Ecuador build a sustainable framework to counter the threat of drug trafficking and other transnational crimes.

Program Goals and Objectives

U.S. counternarcotics assistance is provided to improve the institutional capabilities of Ecuador’s police, military, and judicial sectors in support of the host government's efforts to effectively combat narcotics trafficking, money laundering, and other transnational crimes. These program objectives support Embassy Quito's foremost Mission Strategic and Resource Plan Goal for FY 2012 to disrupt narcotics trafficking and other transnational crimes. The objectives and goals also reflect INL's FY 2012 Bureau Strategic and Resource Plan goals of Criminal Justice Sector Capacity Building and Security Sector Reform (SSR), Counternarcotics, and Transnational Crime.

Objective 1: Strengthen police capabilities to disrupt the movement of illicit drugs transiting through Ecuador, and on to the United States, and dismantle narcotics trafficking organizations operating in Ecuador.

Objective 2: Build law enforcement capabilities to conduct criminal and financial investigations, resulting in arrest and prosecution of narcotics trafficking and transnational criminal organization leadership.

Objective 3: Support and strengthen military mobility, communications, and operational capabilities to effectively disrupt narcotics trafficking along Ecuador's northern border with Colombia.

FY 2012 Program

Counternarcotics

Interdiction: Funds will support the Counternarcotics Police Directorate (DNA) port and canine operations; mobile anti-narcotics units including modernization of detection equipment; provision of communications equipment; vehicle acquisition and maintenance; as well provide a port security advisor from U.S. Customs and Border Protection. Funding will also support improving the prosecution of criminal cases, particularly those related to narcotics trafficking and money laundering, as well as provide assistance for the implementation of the code of criminal procedures. Support for the military will build capacity to protect national territory against narcotics traffickers in areas of limited police presence, particularly along the northern border with Colombia.

Demand Reduction: Funds will provide informational materials and sponsor drug prevention and demand reduction public events to increase public awareness of the dangers of drug abuse. Funds will also support drug awareness projects operated by the Government of Ecuador (GOE).

Transnational Crime

Money Laundering and Chemical Control: Funds will provide training, equipment, and technical assistance to help the GOE more effectively combat money laundering. Funds will support financial investigative and chemical control police units and also the Financial Intelligence Unit.


If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.
If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.

Ecuador

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2010

FY 2011

FY 2012

Actual

Estimate

Request

1.4 Counternarcotics

Interdiction

3,250

3,100

6,100

Demand Reduction

50

50

50

Program Development & Support (objective 6.2 attributed to 1.4)

1,150

1,200

1,250

1.4 Subtotal

4,450

4,350

7,400

1.5 Transnational Crime

Money Laundering

50

150

300

1.5 Subtotal

50

150

300

Total

4,500

4,500

7,700


Haiti

Budget Summary ($000)

If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.

FY 2010 Actual

FY 2010 Supplemental

FY 2011 Estimate

FY 2012 Request

21,107

147,660

19,420

19,420

Program Overview

Strengthening Haiti’s security sector capacity is a key U.S. priority. The Haitian National Police (HNP) lacks the ability to investigate or respond to crimes, patrol, keep public order or even communicate internally. These basic prerequisites for enforcing the law are lacking throughout Haiti, but particularly in the Port au Prince slums, which are the epicenter of anti-government and criminal activity. Haiti remains a major drug transit country. Significant amounts of cocaine from South America transit the island of Hispaniola on its way to U.S. markets. In addition to posing problems for the United States, the drug trade in Haiti undermines the rule of law in that fragile country by fostering corruption and fomenting armed violence perpetrated by criminal gangs and political opposition groups. The Haitian government views counternarcotics as a priority. The January 12, 2010 earthquake had a tremendous effect on the way forward as the Government of Haiti (GOH) rebuilds and continues its efforts to improve the capacity of its law enforcement, corrections, and judicial organizations. The FY 2010 supplemental funding will support the restoration and expansion of Haiti’s security and justice sector institutions. Continued funding in FY 2012 is needed to demonstrate USG commitment to help Haiti continue to address the areas of weakness in the security sector and support ongoing development and capacity building for its law enforcement and judicial institutions.

Program Goals and Objectives

The FY 2012 program focuses on police reform (crime control assistance), corrections (criminal justice assistance), and counternarcotics. These programs will be coordinated in cooperation with the GOH, the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH), and other donors. The Haiti program also supports INL’s FY 2012 Bureau Strategic and Resource Plan goals of Counternarcotics and Transnational Crime along with the Department of State’s Haiti strategy, which was revised after the January 12 earthquake.

Objective 1: Restore the law enforcement capabilities of the GOH to maintain public order, reduce the attractiveness of illegal migration, and the ability of criminals to traffic drugs into the United States, which will promote economic development and long-term stability. Train and vet existing and 1,000 newly recruited Haitian National Police to democratic policing standards to form the core of a credible, competent police force. Ensure that Haitian police are able to respond to reports of crime in a timely manner, conduct effective patrols, direct traffic, communicate effectively, and conduct internal and criminal investigations, with crime reducing over time. Decrease the number of incidences of human rights abuses by police.

Objective 2: Improve the public’s confidence in the police as an institution through increased crime reporting.

Objective 3: Assist the Haitian Coast Guard (HCG) to improve its capacity to control its territorial waters and borders.

Objective 4: Increase in arrests and prosecutions of trafficking organizations through anti-corruption and anti-money laundering programs.

Objective 5: Support, expand and improve the capacity of the HNP Counternarcotics Unit (BLTS).

FY 2012 Program

Stabilization Operations and Security Sector Reform

Civilian Police (CIVPOL)

FY 2010 Supplemental INCLE funds support an increase in the number of police and corrections officers the U.S. is contributing to MINUSTAH from 55 to 110 to respond to greater needs in the aftermath of the earthquake. In FY 2012, funds will support the original contribution of 55, rather than the temporarily increased level of 110 officers

U.S. officers will continue providing expertise in the areas of academy training, field mentoring, patrols, community policing, investigations, traffic, crime analysis, forensics, police management, supervisory skills, police administration, and other specialized skills.

U.S officers will also continue to co-locate with Haitian officers at police stations and engage in joint patrols to continue increasing public confidence in the police.

Police Development and Reform

Funds will support the HNP to recruit, select and train a minimum of 1,000 qualified officers. Specialized units, including forensics, SWAT, and traffic will be strengthened and trained. HNP supervisory, management, and human rights training will be provided as well as periodic in-service training for existing HNP officers. Funds will also provide equipment, communications, and logistical support to these trained officers.

Funds will support the Inspector General’s office to enhance HNP capacity to perform internal police investigations, exercise effective command and control over the police force, and ensure adherence to policies and procedures.

Counternarcotics

Counterdrug Support

Funds will support port security and maritime interdiction operations from HCG bases at Killick, Cap Haitian, and Port-de-Paix. In partnership with the U.S. Coast Guard, funding will advance post-earthquake efforts aimed at restoring and upgrading the logistical and maintenance capacity of the HCG. A key initiative will be co-locating other HNP units to increase GOH presence and improve operational results.

The BLTS currently has some officers vetted by DEA. Funds will be used to provide additional training and equipment, including radios and vehicles. Funding will support the deployment of elements of both units throughout the country, as well as the intelligence collection and analysis center within the HNP.

Transnational Crime

Anti-Money Laundering

Funds will be used to continue the efforts of improving the capacity of the GOH to detect money-laundering and develop a procedure for using seized assets.

The UCREF FIU (the Haitian Financial Intelligence Unit) and the financial crimes investigative unit (BAFE) suffered severe losses during the earthquake, including their buildings, forcing them to cease operations. Funds will build on FY 2010 supplemental funding projects to reconstitute and build capacity in these agencies by providing follow-on technical assistance and financial investigation mentors to support the anti-money laundering and anti-corruption efforts of the UCREF FIU and BAFE.

Rule of Law and Human Rights

Criminal Justice Development

Funds will support capacity building of correctional personnel to better run newly-built institutions and provide appropriate equipment and training necessary to ensure well maintained and functions institutions.


If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.
If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.

Haiti

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2010

FY 2010

FY 2011

FY 2012

Actual

Supp

Estimate

Request

1.3 Stabilization Operations and Security Sector Reform

Civilian Police

12,000

45,000

10,000

10,000

Police Development and Reform

4,107

35,100

4,320

4,320

Corrections

0

0

0

0

Program Development & Support (objective 6.2 attributed to 1.3)

0

0

0

930

1.3 Subtotal

16,107

80,100

14,320

15,250

1.4 Counternarcotics

Counternarcotics Support

2,600

14,700

2,570

2,570

Program Development & Support (objective 6.2 attributed to 1.4)

900

6,500

930

0

1.4 Subtotal

3,500

21,200

3,500

2,570

1.5 Transnational Crime

Anti-Money Laundering

0

0

300

300

Trafficking in Persons

0

5,500

0

0

1.5 Subtotal

0

5,500

300

300

2.1 Rule of Law and Human Rights

Criminal Justice Development

1,500

40,860

1,300

1,300

2.1 Subtotal

1,500

40,860

1,300

1,300

Total

21,107

147,660

19,420

19,420


Mexico

Budget Summary ($000)

If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.

FY 2010 Actual

FY 2010 Supplemental

FY 2011 Estimate

FY 2012 Request

190,000 *

175,000 **

117,000

248,500

*$94 million INCLE in the Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2009 (P.L. 111-32) was designated as forward funding for FY 2010.

** The FY 2010 INCLE Supplemental amount was used to fund FY 2011 programming requirements.

Program Overview

Due to the high demand for illicit narcotics in our country, the United States has a shared responsibility for combating the crime and violence that so gravely affect citizens throughout the region. Roughly ninety-five percent of all the cocaine consumed in the United States transits through Mexico and Central America. The Mexico INCLE program builds on efforts begun under the Merida Initiative, with a shift away from expensive equipment and towards supporting Mexican government institutional reforms and strengthening rule of law. These programs are designed to complement renewed U.S. efforts at home to reduce drug demand, to stop the flow of weapons, and bulk cash generated by illicit drug sales, and to confront gangs and criminal organizations.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Mexico program supports the Mexican Government’s significant investment in promoting rule of law, providing for citizen security, and reforming state institutions towards greater transparency, responsiveness, and respect for human rights. Merida Initiative Programs will focus on four strategic areas: disrupt capacity of organized crime to operate; institutionalize capacity to sustain rule of law; create a 21st century border structure; and build strong and resilient communities. The program supports the Embassy’s priorities reflected in its FY 2012 Mission Strategic and Resource Plan related to promoting : a) Security and Protection of the U.S. and Mexican People, and b) People and the Future: Building Communities and Supporting Youth on Both Sides of the Border. The program also supports INL’s goals of Counternarcotics, Criminal Justice Sector Capacity Building and Security Sector Reform (SSR), and Transnational Crime as stated in its FY 2012 Bureau Strategic and Resource Plan.

The four strategic objectives of the Merida Initiative in Mexico are:

Objective 1: Dismantle organized criminal groups by building Mexican law enforcement capacities in information collection and analysis, training and equipping units, and conducting investigations against organized crime, money laundering, arms trafficking, and other crimes.

Objective 2: Institutionalize justice-sector reforms to sustain the rule of law and respect for human rights through continued large-scale institution building projects with security and judicial institutions at the federal level and expanded efforts at state and local institutions.

Objective 3: Create efficient, economically competitive borders crossings along Mexico’s northern and southern borders that ensure “secure two-way flows” of travelers and trade; improve enforcement cooperation between ports of entry; and reduce the flow of drugs to the north, and guns and bulk cash to the south.

Objective 4: Build strong and resilient communities with long-term alternatives to working for organized crime, and that understand and are engaged in Mexico’s legal and judicial reforms.

FY 2012 Program

Disrupting Capacity of Organized Crime to Operate

Financial crimes and asset forfeiture programs, which include training, information technology equipment, and other support, will strengthen Mexico’s ability to target money-laundering, the financial underpinning of the drug cartels. Training, equipment, and other support for specialized units, increasingly at the state and local levels, will focus investigations on all arms of organized crime, while allowing for their rapid and safe deployment to areas of concern. Information technology and training will continue to support a Government of Mexico (GOM) project to develop and implement an advanced information-sharing system that integrates public security, law enforcement, immigration and related information into one place, making the information available to all law enforcement agencies.

Institutionalize Capacity to Sustain Rule of Law

Law enforcement training and professionalization at the federal level, and increasingly at the state and local level, will enable the military to stand down from its law enforcement and counternarcotics role. This training will include a human rights element. Training, technical assistance, limited equipment, and other support will assist federal and state judicial systems to implement necessary reforms. Topics may include trial advocacy skills, development of criminal procedure codes, and evidence collection and chain of custody, among others. Internal controls and anti-corruption programs will continue to provide technical assistance, equipment, training, and other support to target corruption and build trustworthy institutions. Funds will continue to support the development and implementation of the national police registry to weed out corrupt police. Funds will support technical assistance, equipment and training to bring Mexico’s forensics laboratories into conformity with international standards and modernize the Office of the Attorney General’s and Federal Police’s evidence examination abilities. Training, equipment, and technical expertise will be provided to continue support for significant prison reforms and prison system expansion. Prosecutors and other justice sector officials will be trained in support of Mexico’s transition to an oral, accusatorial judicial system.

Create a 21st Century Border Structure

Assistance will provide training and other support to boost border inspection capabilities. Trained canine teams will target illegal activity, especially along the border with the United States. Funds may continue support for a training academy for the Customs Secretariat.

Build Strong and Resilient Communities

Continued support for drug demand reduction efforts will include assistance for prevention, treatment, and continuation of drug courts. Support will continue for a secure and anonymous citizen complaint project that will promote public engagement in the fight against illegal activity. Training in strategic messaging will promote the rule of law through media and other fora, and continue to help inform the public about institutional reforms and efforts being undertaken through the Merida Initiative.


If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.
If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.

Mexico

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2010

FY 2010

FY 2011

FY 2012

Actual

Supp

Estimate

Request

1.4 Counternarcotics

Counternarcotics Program

78,000

58,000

15,000

52,000

Program Development & Support (objective 6.2 attributed to 1.4)

14,000

5,000

15,000

15,000

1.4 Subtotal

92,000

63,000

30,000

67,000

1.5 Transnational Crime

Transnational Crime Program

10,000

0

0

13,000

1.5 Subtotal

10,000

0

0

13,000

2.1 Rule of Law and Human Rights

Rule of Law and Human Rights Program

76,500

85,000

87,000

155,500

Program Development & Support (objective 6.2 attributed to 2.1)

5,000

2.1 Subtotal

76,500

90,000

87,000

155,500

2.2 Good Governance

Good Governance Program

11,500

22,000

0

13,000

2.2 Subtotal

11,500

22,000

0

13,000

Total

190,000 *

175,000**

117,000

248,500

*$94 million INCLE in the Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2009 (P.L. 111-32) was designated as forward funding for FY 2010.

** The FY 2010 INCLE Supplemental amount was used to fund FY 2011 programming requirements.


Paraguay

Budget Summary ($000)

If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.

FY 2010 Actual

FY 2011 Estimate

FY 2012 Request

500

500

800

Program Overview

Paraguay is a major drug transit country for Andean-sourced cocaine and a principal money laundering center. The Tri-Border Area (TBA) where Paraguay intersects with Brazil and Argentina is a hub for trafficking in drugs, contraband and pirated goods, arms, and persons. The Lugo administration has expressed strong political will to curb narcotics trafficking and has been a solid partner with the United States. FY 2012 funds will maintain support for counternarcotics efforts and provide support for new rule of law activities to strengthen judicial institutions – judges, prosecutors and police – and address pervasive corruption and impunity.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Paraguay program supports the embassy’s FY 2012 Mission Strategic and Resource Plan priority of Disrupting Criminal Organizations and INL’s FY 2012 Bureau Strategic and Resource Plan goals of Transnational Crime, Counternarcotics, and Criminal Justice Sector Capacity Building and Security Sector Reform (SSR).

Objective 1: Fortify Paraguay’s institutional and operational capability to combat criminal activity in an effort to deter or disrupt criminal organizations, prevent terrorism, and combat transnational crime, terrorism financing, and narcotics trafficking.

Objective 2: Help Paraguay enhance measures to address corruption and address the challenges that constrict its ability to prosecute and convict narcotics traffickers and other perpetrators of transnational crime.

FY 2012 Program

Counternarcotics

Interdiction: Funds will provide training and technical assistance to the Anti-Narcotics Secretariat (SENAD) and the Paraguayan National Police (PNP) to improve operational capacity to investigate and prosecute major traffickers and money launderers. Assistance will provide training for special agents and attorneys in investigative and prosecutorial procedures as well as operational support such as per diem for joint investigations with the DEA. Support will also provide commodities, such as replacement computers, as well as maintenance of the drug analysis laboratory equipment. Funds will also provide ongoing support to SENAD’s narcotics detection canine program and demand reduction program. This assistance complements other resources targeting anti-corruption efforts.

Rule of Law and Human Rights

Constitution, Laws and Legal Framework: Support will include training prosecutors and judges on key legislation to fortify Paraguay’s operational and legal capability to combat criminal activity, as well as address corruption. Such training will be designed to encourage Paraguayan authorities to pass legal reforms that will allow prosecutors to effectively prosecute criminals.


If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.
If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.

Paraguay

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2010

FY 2011

FY 2012

Actual

Estimate

Request

1.4 Counternarcotics

Interdiction

355

170

455

Demand Reduction

30

0

0

Program Development & Support (objective 6.2 attributed to 1.4)

115

130

145

1.4 Subtotal

500

300

600

1.5 Transnational Crime

Financial Crimes/Money Laundering

0

200

0

1.5 Subtotal

0

200

0

2.1 Rule of Law and Human Rights

Constitution, Laws & Legal Framework

0

0

100

Justice System

0

0

100

2.1 Subtotal

0

0

200

Total

500

500

800


Peru

Budget Summary ($000)

If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.

FY 2010 Actual

FY 2011 Estimate

FY 2012 Request

40,000

31,500

28,950

Program Overview

Peru is a major cocaine producing country, exporting to markets in South America, Mexico, the United States, and Europe. The U.S. Crime and Narcotics Center estimated that Peru had 40,000 hectares (ha) used for coca cultivation nationwide in 2009. Authorities eradicated 12,033 ha of illicit coca in the Upper Huallaga Valley (UHV) and Ucayali department during 2010, a figure higher than the 10,000 ha target set at the beginning of the year. Eradication, linked closely to alternative development programs, has led to dramatic reductions of coca cultivation in the UHV, where eradication efforts have been focused. This dramatic reduction in coca cultivation is particularly evident in San Martin department. However, challenges remain in other parts of the country where State presence is limited and where increased coca cultivation and trafficking have been reported, such as in the Apurimac and Ene River Valley (VRAE). Peru is a key U.S. partner in the region and we are committed to working with the Government of Peru (GOP) to effectively address illicit coca cultivation, narcotics trafficking, and the related transnational criminal challenges that follow while building institutional capacity.

Program Goals and Objectives

The USG supports programs that enhance the capabilities of the Peruvian National Police (PNP) and that of the Anti-Narcotics Directorate (DIRANDRO) to provide security for eradication teams and interdiction in coca cultivation and narcotics trafficking zones. USG counternarcotics assistance also helps the Peruvian government publicize links between drug production and common crime so that Peruvians understand that their quality of life is degraded by drug trafficking. Embassy Lima ranked keeping drug production and trafficking in check as one of their top priorities in the Mission Strategic and Resource Plan. The Garcia administration’s counternarcotics strategy coincided with U.S. goals, clearly linking interdiction and eradication with alternative development and prevention. The objectives and goals also reflect INL's FY 2012 Bureau Strategic and Resource Plan goals, notably, counternarcotics, transnational crime, and Criminal Justice Sector Capacity Building and Security Sector Reform (SSR). We seek a similar strong cooperative relationship with the Humala administration.

Objective 1: Build institutional capability to investigate and prosecute transnational crimes, as well as eradicate illicit crops and interdict drugs and precursors produced within or transiting through Peru.

Objective 2: Assist law enforcement to conduct criminal and financial investigations that will result in arrests and prosecutions of trafficking organizations.

Objective 3: Combat corruption, especially within the Peruvian National Police force.

Objective 4: Improve police capabilities to provide for citizens' safety and contribute to the enhancement of the rule of law.

Objective 5: Improve community awareness of the negative effects of illicit drug use and to support community anti-drug coalitions.

FY 2012 Program

Counternarcotics

Eradication: Coca and Poppy Eradication and Crop Monitoring Funds will provide operational support for the labor intensive manual eradication program managed under the Coca Monitoring and Reduction Agency (CORAH), including transport, food, salaries, field gear and tools, tents, first aid, and training for the eradicators. Funding will also support technical assistance for the Corps for Assistance to Alternative Development (CADA), the Peruvian agency that monitors and maps coca and poppy cultivation, which provides a means to verify eradication results. As an independent entity, CADA collaborates with the UN and GOP to develop and utilize monitoring methodologies. Funds will support the work of the Tropical Cultivations Institute (ICT), which conducts alternative crop research, as well as support agricultural extension services that facilitate and hasten coca growers’ transition to production of licit crops. Aviation support for eradication will cover operating and maintenance assistance for Peru's aviation police (DIRAVPOL), including airlift for eradication and logistical support. These funds support pilots, aircrews, and associated personnel for 24 USG-owned Huey-II helicopters, two fixed-wing aircraft, and limited operational support for Peruvian MI-17 helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft, all in support of coca eradication and related law enforcement activities east of the Andes. Training for pilots and mechanics, maintenance, hangars, warehousing, aircraft rental when needed, and operational support for DIRAVPOL personnel also receive funding.

Interdiction: Law enforcement funding will provide support to the PNP to enhance law enforcement capabilities and counternarcotics interdiction efforts. Funds will be used for items such as vehicles, communications equipment, and field gear. Funds will also be used for training and field exercises designed to enhance PNP Anti-Narcotics police capabilities, as well as those of other police units. The increase of Peru's counternarcotics police personnel in source zones over the last five years has contributed to more effective and sustained eradication and interdiction operations. Funding will support PNP education improvements, including curriculum reform, as well as PNP basic police academies and pre-academies strategically located in communities in coca source zones east of the Andes, including support for operational effectiveness and infrastructure improvements. Support will also include capacity-building initiatives to address citizens’ safety, such as community policing and model police stations. Funds will support the development of the Ministry of Interior's Executive Office for Drug Control, including addressing management capacity and the handling of seized assets. Port security support funds will continue to improve the GOP’s capacity to examine cargo and passengers through facilities improvements, equipment acquisitions, and training. Peruvian Customs funds will bolster inspection and enforcement operations by Peruvian Customs at principal airports and seaports as well as other smaller installations. This support will include Customs’ canine program and acquisition of computers and non-intrusive inspection equipment, along with renovation of existing facilities. Aviation support for interdiction will provide operating and maintenance assistance for interdiction airlift to DIRAVPOL including logistical support for counternarcotics units. The nationalization plan for Peru includes scaling back aviation assistance. Funds will support pilots, aircrews, and support personnel for USG-owned Huey-II helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft, plus provide limited operational support for Peruvian helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft, but support will be reduced from previous years as Peru takes on increased responsibility for and title to some aircraft. These activities support coca eradication and other law enforcement efforts east of the Andes. Funds will also support training for pilots and mechanics, maintenance, hangars, warehousing, aircraft rental when needed, and operational support for DIRAVPOL personnel.

Administration of Justice/Prosecution: Funds will provide training and some travel expenses to support GOP prosecutors assigned to oversee drug enforcement operations, including investigation and trial preparation. Funds will support advanced training for prosecutors already in the program and entry-level training for new prosecutors. Funds will support training and technical assistance for prosecutors to learn better case management practices.

Demand Reduction: Funding will support the work of NGOs such as the Information and Education Center for the Prevention of Drug Abuse (CEDRO) to reduce drug abuse among youth, research drug abuse trends, focus on educational workshops, and train teachers and health professionals about illicit drug use. Funds will be used to purchase promotional materials and publications used in Community Anti-Drug Coalition (CAC) campaigns, train community-based facilitators in the CAC model, and sponsor public events designed to publicize CAC activities. Funds will implement a modern media campaign to increase drug awareness and deter youth from abusing drugs. In addition, there will be an expansion of school-based drug education programs in the capital and in strategic provinces.

Transnational Crime

Money Laundering: Funds will support a series of seminars and training programs for police, prosecutors, and judges in all aspects of detecting, investigating, and prosecuting money laundering crimes which will be organized by the Organization of American States’ Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission and the United Nations. Funds will continue to support Peru’s Financial Investigative Unit to analyze financial transactions, report on suspicious activities, and assist investigations of financial crimes.

Asset Forfeiture: Funds will assist in the implementation of asset seizure and forfeiture laws and strengthen the seized asset management regime through the provision of training, advising, exchange of best practices, and work with U.S. partners.


If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.
If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.

Peru

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2010

FY 2011

FY 2012

Actual

Estimate

Request

1.4 Counternarcotics

Eradication

Coca and Opium Poppy Eradication and Crop Monitoring

13,000

11,500

6,000

Crop Research and Extension

1,000

1,000

1,000

Aviation Support

4,000

2,200

2,000

Interdiction

Law Enforcement Support

6,000

6,000

6,000

Rural Community Policing

1,200

Peruvian Customs

1,000

1,350

1,300

Port Security Program

1,500

1,350

1,500

Aviation Support

8,000

2,000

3,400

Administration of Justice/Prosecution

500

750

1,200

Demand Reduction

750

600

600

Program Development & Support (objective 6.2 attributed to 1.4)

4,000

4,000

4,000

1.4 Subtotal

39,750

30,750

28,200

1.5 Transnational Crime

Money Laundering and Financial Crime

250

750

550

Asset Forfeiture

200

Program Development & Support (objective 6.2 attributed to 1.5)

0

0

0

1.5 Subtotal

250

750

750

Total

40,000

31,500

28,950


Uruguay

Budget Summary ($000)

If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.

FY 2010 Actual

FY 2011 Estimate

FY 2012 Request

-

-

100

Program Overview

Drug trafficking in Uruguay continues, and the presence of Mexican, Colombian and Eastern European traffickers is increasing, despite concerted and consistent government efforts to combat these trends. Despite high profile successes such as the seizure of over two metric tons of cocaine in October 2009 and the arrest of a prominent Colombian trafficker in February 2010, Uruguay will depend on international training and support until it can modernize its police and judicial system. Program support in Uruguay is a strategic decision at this juncture that will be key to ensuring continued commitment by Uruguay’s new government. Bilateral relations on counternarcotics and money laundering have been excellent over the past two years, and U.S. funds have permitted significant advances in investigation technology. There has been increasing cooperation with counterparts in Argentina and major progress in prosecutions and asset forfeiture.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Uruguay program supports the embassy’s FY 2012 Mission Strategic and Resource Plan priority to Improve Homeland Security by Helping Uruguay Combat Terrorism and Transnational Crime and INL’s FY 2012 Bureau Strategic and Resource Plan goal of Counternarcotics, Criminal Justice Sector Capacity Building and Security Sector Reform, and Transnational Crime.

Objective 1: Strengthen Uruguay’s technical and operational ability to interdict narcotics, conduct complex criminal investigations, and arrest traffickers.

Objective 2: Strengthen Uruguay’s rehabilitation and prevention programs to reduce and prevent the consumption of illegal drugs, and to assist with the reinsertion of addicts into society.

FY 2012 Program

Interdiction: Funds will provide training, equipment and other support to modernize and enhance the capabilities of the national drug police, who continue to have shortages in these critical areas. Specifically, funds will help support the border offices and Real-Time Analytical Intelligence Database (RAID) of the Directorate for the Suppression of Illicit Trafficking in Drugs (DGRTID).

Demand Reduction: Funds will support ongoing demand reduction programs to identify high-risk populations and build host nation capacity to serve them. Currently, limited resources reach only a small percentage of drug addicts. A 2011 National Drug Use Survey, partially funded by the USG, is establishing a baseline of drug use trends in the country and will enable the Embassy and Government of Uruguay to better target their demand reduction programming. Funds will continue to support rehabilitation and prevention programs directed at high-risk populations.


If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.
If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.

Uruguay

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2010

FY 2011

FY 2012

Actual

Estimate

Request

1.4 Counternarcotics

Interdiction

0

0

70

Demand Reduction

0

0

25

Program Development & Support (objective 6.2 attributed to 1.4)

0

0

5

1.4 Subtotal

0

0

100

Total

0

0

100


Western Hemisphere Regional

Budget Summary ($000)

If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.

FY 2010 Actual

FY 2011 Estimate

FY 2012 Request

Central America Regional Security Initiative

63,500 *

71,508

55,000

Caribbean Basin Security Initiative

10,607

37,500 **

30,000

Total

74,107

109,008

85,000

* The CARSI Spending Plan submitted to the Congress (CN 10-197) totals $65M, which reflects $63.5M for Central America assistance and includes $1.5M for Guatemala bilateral activities.

** In FY 2011, CBSI funds were requested as a separate line item, but are reincorporated into Western Hemisphere Regional line item in FY 2012.

Program Overview

The Western Hemisphere regional request includes INCLE funding for both the Central America Regional Security Initiative and Caribbean Basin Security Initiative. The following provides summary information for both programs. In addition, detailed information on both programs is provided in the following chapters.

Central America Regional Security Initiative (CARSI): Citizen safety in Central America is deteriorating rapidly as criminal organizations seek to establish strongholds in the region. Funds will continue to support training and build capacity of law enforcement and rule of law institutions throughout Central America, with less focus on procurement of equipment. Funds will support efforts to address border and port security; continue support for vetted units and maritime and land interdiction; sustain the final year of the four-year investment for aviation based in Guatemala; and continue to build capacity of law enforcement and other actors to address transnational crime, including anti-gang training. Funds will also support improved prison management and equipment, and encourage cooperation and joint operations throughout the region. The program reduces funds for basic law enforcement equipment, while continuing to provide programs that support justice sector reform and local capabilities.

Caribbean Basin Security Initiative (CBSI): Funding will continue to support efforts to combat illicit trafficking and organized crime, strengthen the rule of law, reduce the demand for illegal drugs, and promote social justice in the Caribbean region. Funding will be directed primarily toward enhancing the capacity of criminal justice and regional security institutions such as the Regional Security System in the Eastern Caribbean but will also provide technical assistance to support the investigation and prosecution of financial crimes, prison reform, maritime interdiction, and border control efforts.

Central America Regional Security Initiative (CARSI)

Budget Summary ($000)

If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.

FY 2010 Actual

FY 2011 Estimate

FY 2012 Request

63,500 *

71,508

55,000

* The CARSI Spending Plan submitted to the Congress (CN 10-197) totals $65M, which reflects $63.5M for CARSI, Costa Rica and INL Centrally Managed Central America assistance, as well as $1.5M for Guatemala bilateral activities.

Program Overview

Approximately 95 percent of Andean cocaine transits Mexico and Central America on its way to the United States. With increasing pressure on drug traffickers in Mexico, Colombia, and in international waters, the region is challenged by declining public security as traffickers increasingly shift to Central American territorial waters and land routes as primary transshipment points. Central American officials have identified gangs, drug trafficking, trafficking of arms, and organized crime as the most pressing security concerns in the region. Vulnerabilities created by the increasingly violent nature of the security situation in Central America, if left unchecked, could open the way for more dangerous threats, such as increased levels of public sector corruption, the penetration of the political and security systems by criminals, and the loss of effective governmental control over territory. Our partners in Central America have made some progress in their own efforts to fight transnational organized criminal networks, and while much remains to be done, they are demonstrating an unprecedented willingness to work with us and each other to address these issues.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Central America Regional Security Initiative (CARSI) represents a U.S. partnership with the nations of Central America to address the corrosive effects of gangs, narcotics and arms trafficking, and organized crime on citizen safety. The regional initiative supports host-government strategic initiatives and the FY 2012 Mission Strategic and Resource Plans of the U.S. Embassies in Central America. The initiative also supports INL’s FY 2012 Bureau Strategic and Resource Plan goals of Counternarcotics, Transnational Crime and Criminal Justice Sector Capacity Building and Security Sector Reform (SSR).

CARSI provides funding in a range of areas, including direct law enforcement cooperation, assistance for law enforcement and justice sector capacity building, and prevention programs aimed at addressing the root causes of crime and violence. We recognize the immediate need to combat the criminal organizations and associated violence; the medium-term requirement to augment the capabilities of civilian law enforcement and security entities; and the long-term necessity of strengthening judicial and other state institutions to resist corruption and improve the administration of justice. The programs will strive to address citizen safety, borders and ports, youth issues (including anti-gang efforts), and counternarcotics.

Objective 1: Create safe streets for the citizens in the region.

Objective 2: Disrupt the movement of criminals and contraband within and between the nations of Central America.

Objective 3: Support the development of strong, capable, and accountable Central American Governments.

Objective 4: Re-establish effective state presence and security in communities at risk.

Objective 5: Foster enhanced levels of security and rule of law coordination and cooperation between nations of the region.

FY 2012 Program

Stabilization Operations and Security Sector Reform

Funds will support on-going law enforcement operations and justice sector reform in Central America to establish and sustain professional and accountable law enforcement services. Programs may advance regional police training and equipment and assist in addressing the porous borders through which transnational criminal organizations traffic firearms, bulk cash, narcotics, and other illicit contraband.

Counternarcotics

Funds will combat rising international drug trafficking in Central America. Support may include continuation of successful Drug Enforcement Administration, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and vetted units; continue support for demand reduction programs such as Drug Abuse Resistance Education; continue to support existing aviation assets in Guatemala; and continue to provide for enhanced regional land and maritime interdiction capabilities and logistics supports.

Transnational Crime

Funds will seek to minimize the adverse effects of criminal activities in Central America and improve citizen safety. Efforts may include support for in-service training and capacity enhancements of law enforcement personnel, including anti-gang training and support for Model Precincts; training and technical assistance on financial crimes and asset forfeiture for the region; and advancing programs that improve regional cooperation and operations.

Rule of Law Human Rights

Funds will seek to advance citizen safety, law enforcement, and rule of law activities in Central America. Efforts may include improving courts administration, management and processes; building the capacity of prosecutors and improving collaboration between civilian prosecutors and judicial or police investigators; addressing juvenile justice and juvenile post-prison rehabilitation; improving prison administration, management, and processes; supporting police academies and entry-level training and curricula; and advancing modern policing training and techniques, including through technical assistance and support in high-risk areas.


If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.
If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.

Central America Regional Security Initiative

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2010

FY 2011

FY 2012

Actual

Estimate

Request

1.3 Stability Ops and Security Sector Reform

Program

7,900

5,600

3,060

SubTotal

7,900

5,600

3,060

1.4 Counternarcotics

Program

20,430

21,450

18,780

Program Development & Support (objective 6.2 attributed to 1.4)

4,500

0

0

SubTotal

24,930

21,450

18,780

1.5 Transnational Crime

Program

7,200

28,300

13,415

SubTotal

7,200

28,300

13,415

2.1 Rule of Law and Human Rights

Program

12,382

10,650

15,070

Program Development & Support (objective 6.2 attributed to 2.1)

5,508

4,675

SubTotal

12,382

16,158

19,745

CARSI PD&S

4,500

5,508

4,675

CARSI Regional SubTotal

52,412

71,508

55,000

Costa Rica Bilateral

500

Other Centrally-Managed Central America Assistance (1)

10,588

Western Hemisphere Regional CARSI Total (2)

63,500

71,508

55,000

Guatemala Bilateral

1,500

CARSI Spending Plan Total (3)

65,000

Note 1: Reflects $10.588 M in Centrally-Managed INCLE funds programmed for assistance to Central America subject to the legislative cap on assistance for Central America.

Note 2: The Western Hemisphere Central America total of $63.5M includes $500k for Costa Rica bilateral directives and $10.588 M in Centrally-Managed funds programmed for assistance to Central America.

Note 3: Per CN 10-197, the Western Hemisphere CARSI Spending Plan total of $65M includes $500k for Costa Rica bilateral directives, $10.588M in Centrally Managed INCLE funds programmed for assistance to Central America, and $1.5M for Guatemala bilateral directives. Does not include $4M CICIG and $2M Ministry of Interior Guatemala earmarks not attributed to the Central America cap.

Caribbean Basin Regional Security Initiative (CBSI)

Budget Summary ($000)

If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.

FY 2010 Actual

FY 2011 Estimate

FY 2012 Request

10,607

37,500*

30,000

* In FY 2011, CBSI funds were requested as a separate line item, but are reincorporated into Western Hemisphere Regional line item in FY 2012.

Program Overview

The Caribbean Basin Security Initiative (CBSI) addresses the increasing crime and violence, largely driven by drug and other illicit trafficking, that affects the safety of both United States and Caribbean citizens. As the Merida Initiative and Central America Regional Security Initiative (CARSI) apply pressure against trafficking organizations in Mexico and Central America, CBSI funding will support complementary efforts to address the potential spillover effect from traffickers shifting routes to the Caribbean.

Programs under this initiative may strengthen Caribbean partner nation capabilities in the areas of maritime security, law enforcement, information sharing, border and migration control, transnational crime, and criminal justice.

Programs will build upon previously successful partnerships and develop partner nation capabilities to allow them to cooperate and coordinate in a regional context to address citizen safety concerns.

Program Goals and Objectives

CBSI supports the Caribbean Community’s (CARICOM) “Organized Crime Strategy.” The program also supports FY 2012 Mission Strategic and Resource Plans from our Caribbean posts and INL’s FY 2012 Bureau Strategic and Resource Plan goals of Criminal Justice Sector Capacity Building and Security Sector Reform (SSR), Counternarcotics, and Transnational Crime.

Objective 1: Substantially reduce illicit trafficking.

Objective 2: Advance public safety and security.

Objective 3: Promote Social Justice.

FY 2012 Program

Stabilization Operations and Security Sector Reform

Funds may support law enforcement operations reform in the region to establish and sustain professional and accountable law enforcement services. Funds may be used to establish, train, and equip vetted police units that can work on a wide range of issues from drug and arms trafficking to extradition operations. Programs may support increased information sharing among governments in the Caribbean Basin; support programs for increased proficiency of corrections personnel; and support the sustainability and expansion of law enforcement end-game capabilities, as well as border and port security.

Counternarcotics

Funds may combat the cultivation, production, and trafficking of drugs throughout the Caribbean Basin. Support may include training, equipment, and maintenance to enhance law enforcement officials’ ability to eradicate and interdict illicit drugs. Funds may also establish sustainable institutional change in support of host nation law enforcement capacity, enhance cooperation in securing borders, and provide alternatives to criminal activities through support of rehabilitation efforts.

Transnational Crime

Funds may seek to minimize the adverse effects of criminal activities in the Caribbean Basin. Efforts may support training of law enforcement personnel, including anti-gang training, and training on money laundering, financial crimes, and asset forfeiture for the region.

Rule of Law and Human Rights

USG assistance may seek to advance rule of law activities in the Caribbean Basin. Efforts may include improving courts administration, management, and processes; building capacity of prosecutors and improving collaboration between civilian prosecutors and judicial or police investigators; and improving forensic skills for use in the judicial system.


If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.
If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.

Caribbean Basin Security Initiative

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2010

FY 2011

FY 2012

Actual

Estimate

Request

1.3 Stabilization Operations and Security Sector Reform

Program

4,135

11,295

7,382

Subtotal

4,135

11,295

7,382

1.4 Counternarcotics

Program

3,507

10,856

11,361

Program Development & Support (objective 6.2 attributed to 1.4)

1,700

3,249

6,462

Subtotal

5,207

14,105

17,823

1.5 Transnational Crime

Program

515

3,400

1,915

Subtotal

515

3,400

1,915

2.1 Rule of Law and Human Rights

Program

750

8,700

2,880

Subtotal

750

8,700

2,880

Total

10,607

37,500

30,000

[This is a mobile copy of Western Hemisphere]