Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs
Fact Sheet
January 31, 2014


More information about Fiji is available on the Fiji Page and from other Department of State publications and other sources listed at the end of this fact sheet.

U.S.-FIJI RELATIONS

The United States established diplomatic relations with Fiji in 1971 following its independence from the United Kingdom. Relations between Fiji and the United States have traditionally been excellent. The two countries share a multi-ethnic heritage and an outlook on Pacific Islands regional issues, and often align on major UN voting questions.

Post-independence, Fiji saw a mix of parliamentary democracy, ethnic tensions, and four coups, the most recent occurring in 2006. The United States continues to encourage the government of Fiji to return to democracy and hold elections. The United States is also concerned by the government's targeting of opponents and human rights and labor activists for harassment, arbitrary arrest, and abuse. The three pillars of U.S. policy toward Fiji under the coup government are upholding U.S. law-based sanctions, protecting and promoting U.S. interests in the region, and doing no harm to the people of Fiji. The United States, in concert with allies, is supporting Fiji’s plans to hold credible elections before the end of September, 2014.

U.S. Assistance to Fiji

Although the United States provides relatively little direct bilateral development assistance to Fiji, it contributes through its membership in multilateral agencies and USAID funding of regional environmental projects. Small U.S. grants contribute to civil society, journalism, environmental protection, and anti-human-trafficking efforts. Non-military law enforcement cooperation assists port security, rule of law professionalism, intellectual property rights, and disaster preparedness and response. Assistance in 2012 included an $800,000 grant through a U.S.-based consortium to support the drafting of a new constitution. There is a Peace Corps program in Fiji.

Bilateral Economic Relations

Fiji's economy is shifting from a reliance on sugar and textiles to a focus on tourism and related industries. The United States has been among Fiji's principal trading partners. The main products imported to the U.S. from Fiji include bottled water, tuna, and sugar. U.S. exports to Fiji are mainly machinery, transport equipment, and food. Fiji and the United States do not have a bilateral investment agreement. Tourism including from the United States contributes significantly to the Fijian economy.

Fiji's Membership in International Organizations

Fiji and the United States belong to a number of the same international organizations, including the United Nations, International Monetary Fund, World Bank, Asian Development Bank, and World Trade Organization.

Bilateral Representation

The U.S. Ambassador to Fiji is Frankie A. Reed; other principal embassy officials are listed in the Department's Key Officers List.

Fiji maintains an embassy in the United States at 2000 M Street NW, Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036 (tel: 202-337-8320)..

More information about Fiji is available from the Department of State and other sources, some of which are listed here:

Department of State Fiji Country Page
Department of State Key Officers List
CIA World Factbook Fiji Page
U.S. Embassy: Fiji
History of U.S. Relations With Fiji
Human Rights Reports
International Religious Freedom Reports
Trafficking in Persons Reports
Narcotics Control Reports
Investment Climate Statements
U.S. Census Bureau Foreign Trade Statistics
Export.gov International Offices Page
Travel and Business Information

[This is a mobile copy of Fiji]