Fact Sheet
Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs
March 21, 2011


Spanish version»

Both on land and in the ocean, Chile and the United States share many characteristics, including scenic views, geographic features, ocean-current ecosystems and migratory and endangered species.

The United States and Chile are working together to better manage their marine protected areas under the U.S.-Chile Environmental Cooperation Agreement. With support from the U.S. Department of State and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Park Service (NPS) and the Chilean Ministry of Environment established a Sister Park Arrangement between Francisco Coloane Marine Protected Area in Chile and Glacier Bay National Park in the United States.

Through this partnership, Glacier Bay and Francisco Coloane will collaborate to hold workshops, staff exchanges, and other activities to improve the overall management of both parks and support the long-term protection of natural resources in both countries.

Both Francisco Coloane and Glacier Bay…

  • Face similar challenges – Both parks lie near major shipping channels, receive visitors into fragile ecosystems, face pressures from climate change, and support endangered species.
  • Share similar geographies and climates – Both parks have impressive glaciers, snow-capped mountains, ocean coastlines, and freshwater rivers and lakes.
  • Are home to local communities – Both parks are homelands to Native American cultures and play an important role in their countries’ cultural heritage.
  • Support a wide-range of activities – Both parks support outdoor recreation, tourism, scientific research and commercial fishing.