Press Statement
Bureau of Diplomatic Security
Washington, DC
May 28, 2010


Michael Perkins to Lead Central American Effort

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State Dept Image/May 28, 2010
Date: 05/28/2010 Description: Diplomatic Security Special Agent Michael V. Perkins will head the International Law Enforcement Academy (ILEA) in San Salvador, El Salvador beginning in the summer of 2010. Perkins is the first DS special agent to head one of the four overseas U.S. Department of State-funded academies. May 28, 2010. (U.S. Department of State Photo) - State Dept Image
Diplomatic Security Special Agent Michael V. Perkins will head the International Law Enforcement Academy (ILEA) in San Salvador, El Salvador beginning in the summer of 2010. Perkins is the first DS special agent to head one of the four overseas U.S. Department of State-funded academies. May 28, 2010. (U.S. Department of State Photo)

Michael V. Perkins, a special agent with the U.S. Department of State’s Diplomatic Security Service (DSS), has accepted the prestigious appointment to head the International Law Enforcement Academy (ILEA) in San Salvador, El Salvador.

In 1995, President Clinton called for a network of International Law Enforcement Academies to address transnational crime and terrorism through enhanced international cooperation against crime. Subsequently, the first regional International Law Enforcement Academy opened in Budapest, Hungary that same year as a partnership between U.S. law enforcement agencies and Western European governments.

Similar academies tailored to regional needs were established in Thailand in 1996, Botswana in 2000, and El Salvador in 2005. These academies are funded by the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement of the Department of State, which administers the ILEA programs world-wide. The objective of the ILEA in El Salvador is to help the region’s law enforcement community build and strengthen tactics to fight human trafficking, drug trafficking, gangs, terrorism, money laundering and other financial crimes. More information regarding ILEA San Salvador can be found at www.state.gov/j/inl/crime/ilea/c11286.htm.

Perkins begins his assignment as Director of the ILEA in San Salvador this summer and will be the first DSS agent to do so. The selection process is highly competitive among Federal law-enforcement agencies from the Departments of Justice, State, Treasury and Homeland Security, to include the FBI, DEA, Diplomatic Security and others.

Perkins is a career law-enforcement agent having started in the West Monroe, Louisiana police department and the Ouachita Parish Sheriff’s department. He joined DSS in 1991 and was soon protecting Secretaries of State Warren Christopher and Madeleine Albright. Perkins has been stationed at U.S. Embassies in Guatemala, Zambia, and Peru. Most recently, Perkins manages a multi-national law-enforcement and security staff of 160 in Sri Lanka.

Perkins is the son of Cherry Deats Whipple of West Monroe, Louisiana and Von Perkins, Jr. of Monroe, Louisiana. He graduated from West Monroe High School and earned a bachelor’s degree in law enforcement and a master’s in criminal justice from Northeast Louisiana University, now known as University of Louisiana, Monroe.

“More and more, crime knows no borders. Collaboration between law enforcement agencies around the world is crucial to protecting U.S. interests,” Special Agent Perkins said. “I am honored to represent the State Department’s Diplomatic Security Service and continue the success of the ILEA in San Salvador. I will work with my international law-enforcement colleagues in Central and South America to combat international drug trafficking, criminality, and terrorism.”

The Bureau of Diplomatic Security is the U.S. Department of State’s law enforcement and security arm. The special agents, engineers, and other security professionals of the Bureau are responsible for protecting 285 U.S. diplomatic missions around the world. In the United States, Diplomatic Security personnel investigate passport and visa fraud, conduct personnel security investigations, and protect the Secretary of State and high-ranking foreign dignitaries and officials visiting the United States. More information about the U.S. Department of State and the Bureau of Diplomatic Security may be obtained at www.state.gov/m/ds.

Contact:
E.R. Anderson
571.345.2507

andersoner@state.gov