January 26, 2010

Department of State
Fleet AFV Program Report for Fiscal Year 2009
January 26, 2010

This report summarizes the U.S. Department of State (DOS) fiscal year (FY) 2009 performance in meeting the requirements of: Executive Order (EO) 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management; and the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct; 42 USC 13211-13219) as amended by the Energy Conservation Reauthorization Act of 1998 (ECRA; Public Law 105-388) and the EPAct of 2005 (Public Law 109-58).

Exhibit 1 summarizes DOS progress in meeting the EO and EPAct
requirements. Appendices A and B reflect DOS vehicle acquisitions (for FYs 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012) and fuel consumption data, respectively. Appendix C contains a glossary of acronyms and terms used in this report.

Exhibit 1. DOS Performance – EPAct/EO Requirements FY 2009

If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.
Authority /Mandate
Performance Measure
Requirement
DOS Performance in FY 2009
EPAct 1992
Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) acquisitions
75 percent of the 41 covered1 fleet vehicle acquisitions must be AFVs.
Accumulated 156 AFV credits (380 percent of covered acquisitions).
COMPLIANT
EO 13423
Reduce annual covered petroleum consumption
Reduce petroleum consumption of covered2 vehicles by two percent annually by end of FY 2015 from FY 2005 baseline of 278,985 gasoline gallon equivalents (GGEs).
Consumed 231,285 GGEs, a decrease of 17 percent from baseline (far exceeding the target of an eight percent decrease [256,666 GGEs total] by end of FY 2009).
COMPLIANT
EO 13423
Increase annual alternative fuel (AF) consumption
Equal or exceed the FY 2009 AF usage target of 41,697 GGEs, based on a compounded 10 percent annual rate of increase over the FY 2005 baseline of 28,480 GGEs.
Used 14,115 GGEs, which is only 34 percent of the FY 2009 target. However, it is an increase of seven percent over the previous year.
NON-COMPLIANT
EPAct 2005, Sect. 701
Operate all dual-fuel non-waived AFVs on AF
AF use must comprise 95 percent or more of fuel used in non-waived dual-fuel AFVs.
Actual usage is about six percent.
NON-COMPLIANT


1By definition, the term “covered” relative to vehicle acquisitions includes all domestic non law-enforcement (LE), light-duty (LD) vehicles operated in a metropolitan statistical area (MSA) and acquired by lease or purchase in FY 2009.
2 By definition, the term “covered” relative to petroleum fuel reduction includes all domestic, non-LE vehicles of any weight and operating in or out of an MSA.

EPAct AFV Acquisition Compliance

DOS exceeded EPAct AFV acquisition requirements in FY 2009 as follows:
  • DOS acquired 41 EPAct-covered LD vehicles (as shown in Appendix A).
  • DOS accumulated 156 AFV credits through acquisition of 155 AFVs (including both EPAct covered and non-covered vehicles) and one biodiesel fuel usage credit.
  • The resulting AFV percentage of covered LD vehicle acquisitions was 380 percent (156/41). Even if the non-covered LE AFVs were excluded (as they will be in FY10 and onward), the AFV percentage would be 83 percent, which still exceeds the requirement of 75 percent.

Of note, 10 of the FY 2009 LD acquisitions were hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), which were classified as AFVs for the first time in FY 2009.

AFV Acquisitions

DOS has successfully met the EPAct requirement every year (see Exhibit 2), as reflected in the Federal Automotive Statistical Tool (FAST), due to DOS’s general policy of acquiring AFVs for all covered vehicle requirements so long as AFVs meeting operational requirements are available from the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs).

Exhibit 2. EPAct AFV Requirements vs. AFV Acquisitions + Credits
Date: 01/26/2010 Description: Exhibit 2.  EPAct AFV Requirements vs. AFV Acquisitions + Credits DOS has successfully met the EPAct requirement every year (see Exhibit 2), as reflected in the Federal Automotive Statistical Tool (FAST), due to DOS's general policy of acquiring AFVs for all covered vehicle requirements so long as AFVs meeting operational requirements are available from the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs). - State Dept Image

Appendix A contains FAST data on the numbers and types of LD vehicles that DOS leased or purchased in FY 2009, as well as the projections for FY 2010 and FY 2011. The data in Appendix A is DOS’s “official” vehicular data, which is locked in FAST and cannot be changed until the next annual FAST input window.

FY 2010 Planned and FY 2011 Projected Acquisitions

DOS plans to continue its policy of acquiring AFVs exclusively for its non-exempt fleet except where operational requirements make that impractical or where it is expected to be infeasible to fuel with the AF.

  • For FY 2010, DOS plans to acquire 46 flex-fuel vehicles (FFVs) and one dedicated natural gas vehicle (NGV). While Appendix A shows plans to lease three bi-fuel NGVs from GSA, that will not be possible because bi-fuel NGVs are no longer available to replace the bi-fuels reaching the end of their service life. However, even without counting these three NGVs, the EPAct percentage for FY 2010 is expected to exceed 100 percent due to the two AFV credits for the medium-duty dedicated NGV that will be acquired.
  • For FY 2011, DOS projects that 82 FFVs will be acquired through GSA leases. As in FY 2010, the plans shown in Appendix A to lease four bi-fuel NGVs from GSA will be changed to other available AFVs, such as FFVs or HEVs. Even if only two of the four vehicles can be AFVs, DOS will meet the 75 percent EPAct percentage for FY 2011.

EO 13423 – Compliance with Petroleum Use Reduction and AF Use Increase

In FY 2009 DOS pursued the petroleum reduction targets specified in EO 13423 (signed January 24, 2007), which calls for each federal agency to:

  • Reduce vehicular petroleum consumption (for domestic, non-LE vehicles of any weight and operating in or out of an MSA) by two percent annually through FY 2015 (compared to the FY 2005 usage, which is referred to as the FY 2005 baseline).
  • Increase vehicular non-petroleum based fuel (i.e., alternative fuel) consumption by 10 percent compounded annually.


Reducing Covered Petroleum Consumption

DOS’s covered petroleum fuel consumption in FY 2009 was 231,285 GGEs, a 17 percent reduction from the FY 2005 baseline of 278,985 GGEs. This total is already below the eight percent reduction target for 2015. Consequently, DOS was fully compliant with the petroleum use reduction requirement in FY 2009.

The increase in the FY 2009 covered petroleum consumption from the FY 2008 level (see Exhibit 3) was due mainly to about 29,000 GGEs of diesel fuel consumed by heavy duty vehicles that were commercially leased for a few months by the International Boundary and Water Commission (IBWC) to work on levees.

Exhibit 3. DOS Covered Petroleum Fuel Usage vs. EO 13423 Goals
Date: 01/26/2010 Description: Exhibit 3. DOS Covered Petroleum Fuel Usage vs. EO 13423 Goals  - State Dept Image

Increasing Annual AF Consumption

EO 13423 requires each Federal agency to increase annual AF consumption by 10 percent per year (compounded annually) through the end of FY 2015, based on a FY 2005 baseline. The FY 2005 baseline for DOS is 28,480 GGEs, so the target for FY 2009 is 41,697 GGEs. Unfortunately, despite efforts to increase AF use, DOS consumed only 14,115GGEs of AF in FY 2009, which is only 34 percent of the FY 2009 target. Consequently, DOS is not compliant with this requirement. Limitations to increasing AF use are detailed below.

  • CNG Use: DOS is now operating 19 NGVs, down from 23 in FY 2008, due to the limited availability of NGVs from the OEMs. Moreover, the commercial compressed natural gas (CNG) refueling infrastructure for these vehicles is insufficient, with only one source (the Pentagon Navy Exchange [NEX] station) convenient for daily DOS use. There are two backup sources for CNG refueling: the Washington Navy Yard and the Arlington Transit (ART) site in Shirlington, VA, but these are not convenient to the vehicles. Nevertheless, CNG fuel consumption increased seven percent over the FY 2008 level, indicating increased use of the CNG buses, which had been underutilized in the two previous years due to a temporary shortage of qualified drivers to operate them.
  • E85 Use: The amount of E85 (a fuel blend of 85 percent ethanol and 15 percent gasoline) that is reported in FAST continues to remain in the 3,000- and 4,000-GGE range, as it has over the period FY 2003 to FY 2009. The actual amount consumed is difficult to measure due to fuel-type coding problems at the fueling locations. At the Pentagon NEX station, E85 purchases are erroneously coded as unleaded regular gasoline, but the NEX manager says they cannot afford the software necessary to correct this problem. Meanwhile, the number of FFVs in the fleet has increased from 424 in FY 2008 to 556 (including 376 LE FFVs, which are not required to use the AF) in FY 2009; combined with the increased efforts to make drivers aware of their responsibility to refuel with E85, we expect to see increases in E85 use in the future. However, actual consumption will continue to be difficult to track until industry-wide fuel coding problems, over which DOS has no control, are rectified. Furthermore, while new E85 stations are gradually being established in the Washington DC metropolitan area, only a few serve a large geographic area. Waivers were requested and approved for many of DOS’s FFVs, which are not within five miles or a 15-minute drive of an E85 station (explained below).
  • Biodiesel Use: Diesel vehicles make up only six percent of DOS’s domestic fleet. DOS would like to use biodiesel in all of these vehicles, but few biodiesel stations are convenient for refueling. In FY 2009, DOS consumed 2,541 GGEs of B20 (which equates to 508 GGEs of B100 as identified in Appendix B), a positive six-fold increase over the FY 2008 amount. These B20 purchases took place at one of the two biodiesel stations available in the Washington DC area.

    DOS took a number of steps to increase AF use in FY 2009:

o DOS contacted various entities to develop/promote AF availability. Information was obtained from Electric Vehicles International and Roush, which converts vehicles to run on propane, about possibly acquiring more AFVs to develop AF availability. Possible access to B20 and E85 for the IBWC was discussed with Secure Bio, PROTEC Fuel Management and Gasoline Equipment Systems, Incorporated.
o Informed AFV custodians that DOS is required by EO 13423 to increase annual usage of AFs and by the EPAct (Section 701) to use AFs in AFVs when an AFV is garaged/parked within five miles or 15 minutes of an AF station.
o E-mailed the Alternative Fuel Station Locator web site address to AFV custodians and informed them of the location of the closest AF stations.
o Monitored fuel usage data and notified AFV custodians and their supervisors, as needed, of “missed opportunities” when FFVs were refueled with gasoline instead of reasonably-available E85.

EPACT 2005, Section 701 - Operating Dual-fuel AFVs on AFs

EPAct 2005, Section 701 requires that dual-fuel AFVs (e.g., AFVs that can run equally well on gasoline or an AF) use AF exclusively unless the AF is (1) not reasonably available (neither within a 15-minute drive nor five miles from garaged location) or (2) unreasonably expensive (costs more per gallon than gasoline at the same station). LE vehicles are exempt from this requirement. Federal agencies can request a waiver (annually via FAST by June 30) for each non-exempt, dual-fuel AFV for which the distance, time, and/or cost exceed these criteria.

DOE has approved all of the waivers DOS has requested since the waiver process began in 2007, even as the number of non-exempt, dual-fuel AFVs has increased as shown in Exhibit 4.

Exhibit 4. DOS Non-exempt, Dual-fuel AFV Fleet and Approved Waivers

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FY
# approved waivers
# non-exempt, dual-fuel AFVs
2007
67
147
2008
61
169
2009
58
190


Nevertheless, AF usage in DOS AFVs, estimated to be about six percent in FY 2009, has not met DOS expectations and targets. Thus, DOS is researching the fuel transaction data to see if the FFVs/bi-fuel NGVs are being fueled with gasoline when E85/CNG, respectively, were available at or near the station where the fuel was actually purchased.

As mentioned earlier, fuel coding problems substantially impact the reliability of the fuel transaction data. While the data is available for agencies to download (from GSA and from the Voyager fuel card databases), it is deficient in accurately identifying the fuel purchased because of software problems at the point of sale and problems in the transmission of data from the point of sale to the credit card transaction databases.

For example, the Pentagon NEX station, where DOS vehicles buy about 34,000 GGEs of fuel (B20, CNG, E85, and gasoline) each year, presents the following problems in the fuel transaction data:
  • E85 fuel is coded as gasoline, exactly the same as non-E85 gasoline is coded.
  • B20 is coded as regular diesel.
  • CNG units are not coded properly-- every transaction is coded as one unit, causing DOS to estimate how many units are bought.

Another example is that gasoline purchases made at various Sunoco stations in northern Virginia using the new Wright Express fuel card are appearing as E85 purchases, even though those stations do not sell E85. DOS initiated dialogue with Wright Express in December 2009 to address this miscoding problem, which affected thousands of gallons of fuel. In order to create the FY 2009 FAST report, DOS evaluated the fuel transaction data, “backed out” the “E85” purchases from the Sunoco stations, and then properly counted them as gasoline. The fuel-type coding problem makes it difficult accurately measure progress in the use of AFs.

Conclusion

DOS remains fully committed to compliance with EPAct and EO requirements. With its policy of exclusively acquiring AFVs for its non-exempt fleet, except where operational requirements make such acquisitions impractical, DOS expects to continue its record of meeting or exceeding the 75 percent EPAct percentage for the foreseeable future.

A lack of adequate commercial AF infrastructure continues to hinder AF refueling, but DOS endeavors to keep its waiver requests to a minimum, to monitor the expansion of the AF infrastructure, and to strengthen its efforts to increase driver awareness to use AF whenever the distance/cost criteria are met.


Appendix A

Department of State AFV Report

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2009 AFV Report: Actual Data (FY2009)
1. Actual Light-Duty Vehicle Acquisitions and Exemptions
Vehicle Type
Acquisitions

Leased
Purchased
Total
Total Light-Duty Vehicle Acquisitions
316
672
988

Fleet Exemptions: Fleet Size
0
0
0

Fleet Exemptions: Foreign
0
657
657

Fleet Exemptions: Geographic
0
0
0

Fleet Exemptions: Non-MSA Operation
0
0
0

Vehicle Exemptions: LE Vehicle
282
8
290

Vehicle Exemptions: Non-MSA Operation
0
0
0

Total EPAct-Covered Vehicles
34
7
41

2. Actual Alternative Fuel Vehicle Acquisition Detail
Vehicle Type Fuel LE
Acquisitions
EPAct
Leased
Purchased
Total
Light Duty Vehicles
Sedan/St Wgn Compact
E85 FF
No
2
0
2
2
Sedan/St Wgn Compact
E85 FF
Yes
3
0
3
3
Sedan/St Wgn Compact
GAS HY3
No
5
0
5
5
Sedan/St Wgn Large
E85 FF
Yes
65
0
65
65
Sedan/St Wgn Midsize
E85 FF
No
4
0
4
4
Sedan/St Wgn Midsize
E85 FF
Yes
23
1
24
24
Sedan/St Wgn Midsize
GAS HY3
No
2
0
2
2
LD Minivan 4x2 (Cargo)
E85 FF
Yes
3
0
3
3
LD Minivan 4x2 (Passenger)
E85 FF
No
6
0
6
6
LD Minivan 4x2 (Passenger)
E85 FF
Yes
8
0
8
8
LD Pickup 4x2
E85 FF
No
1
0
1
1
LD SUV 4x2
E85 FF
No
3
0
3
3
LD SUV 4x2
E85 FF
Yes
1
0
1
1
LD Pickup 4x4
E85 FF
No
3
0
3
3
LD Pickup 4x4
E85 FF
Yes
2
0
2
2
LD SUV 4x4
E85 FF
No
2
0
2
2
LD SUV 4x4
E85 FF
Yes
16
0
16
16
LD SUV 4x4
GAS HY3
No
3
2
5
5
Totals:
152
3
155
155

3. Actual EPAct Acquisition Credits Summary
Base AFV Acquisition Credits:
155
Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Credits:
0
Dedicated Light Duty AFV Credits:
0
Dedicated Medium Duty AFV Credits:
0
Dedicated Heavy Duty AFV Credits:
0
Law Enforcement or Emergency/Emergency Response Vehicle Credits: 1
122
Biodiesel Fuel Usage Credits:4
1
Total EPAct Credits:
156
Overall EPAct Compliance Percentage:
380 %
Total EPAct Credits excluding LE & E/ER Credits:
34
EPAct Compliance Percentage excluding LE & E/ER Credits:
83 %



Appendix A (continued)

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2009 AFV Report: Planned Data (FY2010)
1. Actual Light-Duty Vehicle Acquisitions and Exemptions
Vehicle Type
Acquisitions

Leased
Purchased
Total

Total Light-Duty Vehicle Acquisitions
197
979
1,176

Fleet Exemptions: Fleet Size
0
0
0

Fleet Exemptions: Foreign
0
979
979

Fleet Exemptions: Geographic
0
0
0

Fleet Exemptions: Non-MSA Operation
0
0
0

Vehicle Exemptions: LE Vehicle
168
0
168

Vehicle Exemptions: Non-MSA Operation
1
0
1

Total EPAct-Covered Vehicles
28
0
28

2. Actual Alternative Fuel Vehicle Acquisition Detail
Vehicle Type Fuel LE
Acquisitions
EPAct
Leased
Purchased
Total
Light Duty Vehicles
Sedan/St Wgn Midsize
E85 FF
No
7
0
7
7
Sedan/St Wgn Midsize
E85 FF
Yes
6
0
6
0
LD Minivan 4x2 (Passenger)
E85 FF
No
1
0
1
1
LD Minivan 4x2 (Passenger)
E85 FF
Yes
5
0
5
0
LD Pickup 4x2
E85 FF
No
9
0
9
9
LD SUV 4x2
E85 FF
No
3
0
3
3
LD SUV 4x2
E85 FF
Yes
2
0
2
0
LD Pickup 4x4
E85 FF
No
4
0
4
4
LD Pickup 4x4
E85 FF
Yes
1
0
1
0
LD SUV 4x4
E85 FF
No
2
0
2
2
LD SUV 4x4
E85 FF
Yes
5
0
5
0
Medium Duty Vehicles
Bus
CNG DE
No
1
0
1
1
MD SUV
E85 FF
No
1
0
1
1
MD Van (Cargo)
CNG BI
No
1
0
1
1
MD Van (Passenger)
CNG BI
No
1
0
1
1
MD Van (Passenger)
CNG BI
Yes
1
0
1
0
Totals:
50
0
50
30

3. Planned EPAct Acquisition Credits Summary
Base AFV Acquisition Credits:
30
Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Credits:
0
Dedicated Light Duty AFV Credits:
0
Dedicated Medium Duty AFV Credits:
2
Dedicated Heavy Duty AFV Credits:
0
Biodiesel Fuel Usage Credits:4
0
Total EPAct Credits:
32
Overall EPAct Compliance Percentage:
114 %



Appendix A (continued)

If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.
2009 AFV Report: Projected Data (FY2011)
1. Actual Light-Duty Vehicle Acquisitions and Exemptions
Vehicle Type
Acquisitions

Leased
Purchased
Total
Total Light-Duty Vehicle Acquisitions
140
979
1,119

Fleet Exemptions: Fleet Size
0
0
0

Fleet Exemptions: Foreign
0
979
979

Fleet Exemptions: Geographic
0
0
0

Fleet Exemptions: Non-MSA Operation
0
0
0

Vehicle Exemptions: LE Vehicle
107
0
107

Vehicle Exemptions: Non-MSA Operation
2
0
2

Total EPAct-Covered Vehicles
31
0
31

2. Actual Alternative Fuel Vehicle Acquisition Detail
Vehicle Type Fuel LE
Acquisitions
EPAct
Leased
Purchased
Total
Light Duty Vehicles
Sedan/St Wgn Large
E85 FF
Yes
6
0
6
0
Sedan/St Wgn Midsize
E85 FF
No
1
0
1
1
Sedan/St Wgn Midsize
E85 FF
Yes
30
0
30
0
LD Minivan 4x2 (Passenger)
E85 FF
No
1
0
1
1
LD Minivan 4x2 (Passenger)
E85 FF
Yes
6
0
6
0
LD Pickup 4x2
E85 FF
No
3
0
3
3
LD SUV 4x2
E85 FF
No
7
0
7
7
LD Pickup 4x4
E85 FF
No
4
0
4
4
LD Pickup 4x4
E85 FF
Yes
1
0
1
0
LD SUV 4x4
E85 FF
No
6
0
6
6
LD SUV 4x4
E85 FF
Yes
17
0
17
0
Medium Duty Vehicles
MD Van (Cargo)
CNG BI
No
2
0
2
2
MD Van (Passenger)
CNG BI
No
2
0
2
2
Totals:
86
0
86
26

3. Projected EPAct Acquisition Credits Summary
Base AFV Acquisition Credits:
26
Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Credits:
0
Dedicated Light Duty AFV Credits:
0
Dedicated Medium Duty AFV Credits:
0
Dedicated Heavy Duty AFV Credits:
0
Biodiesel Fuel Usage Credits:4
0
Total EPAct Credits:
26
Overall EPAct Compliance Percentage:
84 %



If a scroll bar appears below the following table, swipe the table to move left/right of the dashed line.
2009 AFV Report: Forecast Data (FY2012)
1. Actual Light-Duty Vehicle Acquisitions and Exemptions
Vehicle Type
Acquisitions

Leased
Purchased
Total
Total Light-Duty Vehicle Acquisitions
184
979
1,163

Fleet Exemptions: Fleet Size
0
0
0

Fleet Exemptions: Foreign
0
979
979

Fleet Exemptions: Geographic
0
0
0

Fleet Exemptions: Non-MSA Operation
0
0
0

Vehicle Exemptions: LE Vehicle
139
0
139

Vehicle Exemptions: Non-MSA Operation
4
0
4

Total EPAct-Covered Vehicles
41
0
41




2. Actual Alternative Fuel Vehicle Acquisition Detail
Vehicle Type Fuel LE
Acquisitions
EPAct
Leased
Purchased
Total
Light Duty Vehicles
Sedan/St Wgn Compact
E85 FF
Yes
2
0
2
0
Sedan/St Wgn Large
E85 FF
Yes
18
0
18
0
Sedan/St Wgn Midsize
E85 FF
No
2
0
2
2
Sedan/St Wgn Midsize
E85 FF
Yes
31
0
31
0
LD Minivan 4x2 (Passenger)
E85 FF
No
8
0
8
8
LD Minivan 4x2 (Passenger)
E85 FF
Yes
2
0
2
0
LD Pickup 4x2
E85 FF
No
6
0
6
6
LD Pickup 4x2
E85 FF
Yes
1
0
1
0
LD SUV 4x2
E85 FF
No
4
0
4
4
LD SUV 4x2
E85 FF
Yes
15
0
15
0
LD SUV 4x4
E85 FF
No
5
0
5
5
LD SUV 4x4
E85 FF
Yes
19
0
19
0
Medium Duty Vehicles
MD Van (Cargo)
CNG BI
No
1
0
1
1
MD Van (Passenger)
CNG DE
No
2
0
2
2
Totals:
116
0
116
28

3. Forecast EPAct Acquisition Credits Summary
Base AFV Acquisition Credits:
28
Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Credits:
0
Dedicated Light Duty AFV Credits:
0
Dedicated Medium Duty AFV Credits:
4
Dedicated Heavy Duty AFV Credits:
0
Biodiesel Fuel Usage Credits:4
0
Total EPAct Credits:
32
Overall EPAct Compliance Percentage:
78 %




Appendix B

FY2009 EO 13423 Fuel Consumption Report

Department of State


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Covered Petroleum Consumption in GGE

Baseline

FY 2005
FY 2006
FY 2007
FY 2008
FY 2009
FY 2010
FY 2011
FY 2012
FY 2013
FY 2014
FY 2015
Gasoline

237,260
210,103
166,829
159,409

Diesel

39,640
35,895
41,505
69,843

B20*

414
35
350
2,033

Total
278,985
277,314
246,033
208,684
231,285

Target

273,405
267,825
262,245
256,666
251,086
245,506
239,927
234,347
228,767
223,188

Compliant

No
Yes
Yes
Yes

* B20 is the diesel component from covered biodiesel consumption. Each gallon of B20 consists of 20% biodiesel and 80% petroleum diesel fuel; the consumption quantities reflected for B20 in this table represent the petroleum diesel portion (only) of the total covered B20 consumed (2,541 GGEs).


Alternative Fuel Consumption in GGE

Baseline

FY 2005
FY 2006
FY 2007
FY 2008
FY 2009
FY 2010
FY 2011
FY 2012
FY 2013
FY 2014
FY 2015
CNG

18,265
8,999
9,859
10,557

LNG

0
0
0
0

LPG

0
0
0
0

E-85

4,523
3,454
3,245
3,050

Electric

0
0
0
0

M-85

0
0
0
0

B100*

104
9
88
508

Hydrogen

0
0
0
0

Total
28,480
22,892
12,462
13,192
14,115

Target

31,328
34,460
37,906
41,697
45,867
50,454
55,499
61,049
67,154
73,869

Compliant

No
No
No
No

*The B100 quantity represents 20% of the total reported B20 consumption (2,541 GGEs).



Appendix C

Department of State

Glossary

AF - Alternative Fuel; a fuel defined as alternative by the EPAct of 1992.

AFV - Alternative Fuel Vehicle; a vehicle that can run on an alternative fuel.

ART – Arlington Transit; the mass transit program of Arlington County, VA.

B20 – fuel blend of 20 percent biodiesel and 80 percent petrodiesel.

Biodiesel – a renewable alternative fuel made primarily from soybeans in the US.

CNG – Compressed Natural Gas; a domestically produced alternative fuel.

CNG Bi-Fuel Vehicle – a NGV with two separate fueling systems that enable the vehicle to use either CNG or a conventional fuel (gasoline or diesel).

CNG Dedicated Vehicle – a NGV that uses only CNG fuel.

Diesel – Petroleum diesel

Dual Fuel Vehicle – designed to operate on a combination of an alternative fuel and a conventional fuel (includes CNG bi-fuel and E85 flex-fuel vehicles).

DOS – Department of State

DE – Dedicated; a vehicle that uses only one type of fuel, such as a CNG DE bus.

DS – Bureau of Diplomatic Security

E85 – fuel blend of 85 percent ethanol and 15 percent gasoline.

ECRA – Energy Conservation Reauthorization Act

EO – Executive Order

EO 13423 – Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management

Ethanol – an alcohol-based alternative fuel made primarily from corn in the US.

FAST – Federal Automotive Statistical Tool; an online data reporting system for Federal fleet management personnel.

FFV – Flexible Fuel Vehicle; a vehicle that can run equally well on any blend of gasoline and ethanol up to 85% ethanol (E85).

FMO – Fleet Management & Operations Division, Office of General Services Management, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Operations, Bureau of Administration, DOS

FY – Fiscal Year

GGE – Gasoline Gallon Equivalent: a concept used to describe the difference in energy content of various fuels, using gasoline as the baseline.

GSA – General Services Administration

GVWR – Gross Vehicle Weight Rating

HD – Heavy Duty, a vehicle weighing > 16,000 lbs GVWR.

IBWC – International Boundary and Water Commission

LD – Light Duty; a vehicle that weighs less than 8,500 lbs. GVWR.

LE – Law Enforcement

MD – Medium Duty, a vehicle weighing between 8,500 lbs. and 16,000 lbs. GVWR

MSA – Metropolitan Statistical Area

NEX – Navy Exchange

NGV – Natural Gas Vehicle; a vehicle that can run on CNG.

Petrodiesel – diesel from petroleum.

SUV – Sport Utility Vehicle