Media Note
Washington, DC
February 1, 2010


[Editor's Note: For the original Media Note with Chinese text of the "as translated" section, please view the PDF version.]

The U.S. Department of State today announced that the Democracy is…” Twitter Contest attracted more than 1,400 “Tweeple” (people on Twitter) from across the globe, who answered the call to tweet what democracy is using the hash symbol: #democracyis.

Lasting two weeks, the global “Democracy is…” Twitter Contest generated personal definitions of democracy in eight languages, from more than 30 countries representing all regions of the world.

The tweet with the most re-tweets was submitted by @zuola from China and said, [as translated *] (“Democracy is a set of game rules that, in their gradual process towards perfection, independent individuals and organizations in a civil society seek to maximize their interests by using transparent and nonviolent means.”)

Background

The global “Democracy is…” Twitter Contest expanded the international conversation on democracy, initiated by the Democracy Video Challenge partnership. Both contests engage with and amplify the views of young people around the world by using new media to break down cultural and geographic borders and involve younger audiences in a transparent and candid discussion about an issue of global importance. To date, the Democracy Video Challenge maintains a vibrant online community of over 30,000 friends, fans and followers.

The Democracy Video Challenge is made possible by a public-private partnership that includes: the Center for International Private Enterprise, the International Republican Institute, the International Youth Foundation, the Motion Picture Association of America, NBC Universal, the Recording Industry Association of America, the National Democratic Institute, New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, USC’s Annenberg School of Communication & Journalism, TakingITGlobal, the U.S. Department of State, and YouTube.

For more information please send an email to IIPInquires@state.gov .



PRN: 2010/124