Report
Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
May 13, 2008


Argentina

Budget Summary ($000)

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FY 2007 Actual

FY 2008 Estimate

FY 2009 Request

---

198

305

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Enhance existing law enforcement and judicial capabilities to investigate and prosecute criminal cases, including those involving intellectual property rights.

Improved interoperability among federal law enforcement agencies.

Strengthen the Government of Argentina’s (GOA) judicial branch’s capacity to prosecute human trafficking (TIP) cases and provide victim assistance.

Increased human trafficking cases are brought to trial.

Increased prosecutions of individuals and government officials involved in human trafficking.

Increased number of trafficking victims are reintegrated into society.

Improve coordination among NGOs dedicated to fighting human trafficking.

Increased number of joint activities sponsored by NGOs working on anti-TIP programming.

Transformational Diplomacy

The program’s objectives advance the Secretary’s Transformational Diplomacy Peace and Security objective by funding counternarcotics projects designed increase the capacity of Argentine federal and provincial law enforcement agencies to reduce the trafficking of illicit narcotics through Argentina via land, commercial air and maritime routes. There are indications that there is more cocaine passing through Argentina than previously believed, particularly in containerized cargo. Although most of these drugs remain in Argentina or are trans-shipped to Europe, some make their way to the United States. Drug trafficking and related transnational crimes are a direct threat to democratic institutions and regional stability.

Program Justification

Argentina is not a major drug producing country. However, because of its advanced chemical production facilities, it is one of South America's largest producers of precursor chemicals. Law enforcement authorities believe that the amount of cocaine passing through Argentina continued to increase in 2007. Marijuana remains the most commonly smuggled and consumed drug, with cocaine and inhalants ranked second and third, respectively.

Focused analytical and technical training will enhance the institutional capabilities and interoperability of the Argentine law enforcement agencies to enable them to act more effectively against narcotics trafficking and other trans-border crime, and will help counter spillover of cultivation, trafficking and/or processing operations from Bolivia.

Program Accomplishments

In the first 10 months of 2007, Argentine federal and provincial law enforcement agencies seized nearly 8 metric tons of cocaine, 45.6 metric tons of coca leaf, 74.6 metric tons of marijuana and 5 kilograms (kg) of heroin. Although coca leaf is used almost exclusively for chewing by the indigenous population in a number of Argentina's Northern provinces, seizures of this size are unusual. The ongoing transition from an inquisitorial legal system to an oral accusatorial system will lead to positive reforms in the process of indicting, prosecuting and sentencing of major drug offenders. A principal reform will place responsibility for investigations with prosecutors, which will make the adjudication process more efficient than the current system which places responsibility for conducting investigations with overburdened judges. The USG-funded Northern Border Task Force (NBTF) was responsible for a significant portion of overall 2007 seizures by the GOA, and the recent establishment of the Northeast Border Task Force (EBTF) should produce similarly positive results as it becomes fully operational at the border area with Paraguay and Brazil.

FY 2009 Program

Northern Border Task Force

The 85 law enforcement personnel attached to the NBTF operate in Argentina’s Northeastern province of Salta along the sensitive Bolivian border, which is the primary focus of USG counternarcotics assistance. Funding will continue to support this interagency operation involving federal and provincial law enforcement through training and upgrading of equipment, such as computers and two vehicles; and training in intelligence gathering, law enforcement tactics, firearms and investigative techniques.

North East Border Task Force

USG support will help the GOA replicate the success of the interagency NBTF model in the Northeastern province of Missiones, which forms the Argentine portion of the sensitive Tri-border Area adjoining Argentina, Paraguay, and Brazil. Working with the Gendarmeria, Prefectura and Missiones Provincial police, funding will be used to purchase two vehicles and provide office equipment, including computers, a printer, internet server and secure communications equipment. Training for the new Task Force would include basic narcotics and contraband investigations and tactical training, for as many as 70 federal and provincial law enforcement officers.

Law Enforcement Support

Support will focus on providing intelligence-based training, equipment and software to improve GOA law enforcement agencies’ capacity to conduct complex investigations and support successful prosecutions. This will include training on computer-based intelligence analysis and charting software that will allow law enforcement to track organizations, money flow and communications. USG funds will provide training in the use of Real-Time Analytical Intelligence Database (RAID) software, a data base that allows for the systematic study and exploitation of massive evidence data from large narcotics-related arrests.

Trafficking in Persons

The GOA, in conjunction with the International Organization for Migration (IOM), has dedicated considerable effort to raising public awareness of human trafficking and has made anti-trafficking education a part of its training for law enforcement and judicial officials. In recent months a number of bills seeking to criminalize trafficking in persons have been introduced in the Argentine Congress, and many are optimistic that anti-TIP legislation will pass in 2008. Funding TIP-related training to judges and law enforcement officials will help build on this positive momentum, and strengthen institutional capacity to effectively prosecute human trafficking.

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Argentina
INL BUDGET
($000)

FY 2007
FY 2007
Supp

FY 2008
FY 2009
Interdiction
-
-
97
100

Northern Border Task Force
-
-
42
25

North East Border Task Force
-
-
55
75
Intellectual Property Rights
-
25
Trafficking in Persons/Migrant Smuggling
-
-
97
180
Program Developemnt & Support
-
-
4
-
Total

-
-
198
305


Bahamas

Budget Summary ($000)

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FY 2007 Actual

FY 2008 Estimate

FY 2009 Request

500

496

500

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Operation Bahamas and Turks and Caicos (OPBAT) significantly disrupts the movement of illicit drugs through Bahamian territory to the United States.

The number and amount of seizures of cocaine and marijuana will increase, along with the number of arrests of narcotics traffickers.

Bahamian law enforcement, with U.S. assistance, conducts sophisticated criminal and financial investigations and effective maritime interdiction operations that will result in a reduction in narcotics trafficking activity.

Cooperation and coordination with U.S. law enforcement will increase and several major Bahamian drug trafficking organizations will be dismantled.

The number of narcotics trafficking and money laundering cases successfully prosecuted will increase.

Judicial institutions are modernized so that drug traffickers and money launderers are successfully prosecuted in an expeditious manner and their assets seized and forfeited.

The value of assets seized and forfeited will increase significantly and the government will respond expeditiously to U.S. extradition requests.

Transformational Diplomacy

The program advances the Secretary’s Transformational Diplomacy Peace and Security objective by supporting interdiction efforts, such as OPBAT, a multi-national, multi-agency drug interdiction effort that brings together personnel from the Drug Enforcement Administration, the Department of Homeland Security (including the U.S. Coast Guard and U.S. Customs), the Department of State, the Royal Bahamas Police Force, and the Royal Turks and Caicos Islands Police. OPBAT will continue to spearhead U.S. and Bahamian efforts to protect our South East border from international drug trafficking into and through The Bahamas.

Program Justification

Cocaine from South America arrives in The Bahamas via go-fast boats, small commercial freighters, or small aircraft from Jamaica, Hispaniola and Venezuela. During the 1980s, it was estimated that 70 percent of the drug flow from South America transited the islands, whereas in recent years, the estimated flow has declined to less than 10 percent. OPBAT is the largest, most effective, and longest-existing interdiction effort in the Caribbean. One of the dividends of this long history of cooperation is that the Bahamian drug police are among the best in the Caribbean. Because The Bahamas is a small country with limited assets, it depends upon U.S.-funded equipment and training to keep pace with increasingly sophisticated drug trafficking organizations. U.S. funds provide maintenance and communications for Bahamian fast-boats that provide OPBAT with its interdiction capabilities.

Program Accomplishments

In 2007, the Drug Enforcement Unit (DEU) of the Royal Bahamas Police Force (RBPF) cooperated closely with U.S. and foreign law enforcement agencies on drug investigations. During 2007, including OPBAT seizures, Bahamian authorities seized 630 kilograms of cocaine and approximately 50 metric tons of marijuana. The DEU arrested 527 persons on drug-related offenses and seized $7.8 million in cash, five vessels and an airplane.

FY 2009 Program

Law Enforcement Investigations

This project will focus on improving the ability of the Royal Bahamian Police Force to detect, investigate, and prosecute drug smugglers through training and technical assistance.

Operation Bahamas Turks and Caicos (OPBAT)

This project will support the maintenance of OPBAT bases by purchasing generators and provide equipment, such as refurbished boat engines for interdiction operations.

Program Development and Support (PD&S)

These funds will be used to pay salaries, benefits, and allowances of U.S. personnel and International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) costs.

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The Bahamas
INL BUDGET
($000)

FY 2007
FY 2008
FY 2009
Narcotics Law Enforcement

Law Enforcement Investigations
70
75
75

OPBAT
30
25
25

Sub-Total
100
100
100
Drug Awareness/Demand Reduction
-
-

Program Development and Support

U.S. Personnel
300
296
300

Non-U.S. Personnel
-
-

ICASS Costs
100
100
100

Program Support
-
-

Sub-Total
400
396
400
Total

500
496
500


Dominican Republic

Budget Summary ($000)

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FY 2007 Actual

FY 2008 Estimate

FY 2009 Request

395 *

992

1,150

* FY 2007 funding for the Dominican Republic is accounted for in the Caribbean and Central America Regional account.

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Enhance existing law enforcement targeting of drug-trafficking organizations.

Increased number of interdictions and quantity of drugs seized.

Improve the ability of the Dominican Government (GODR) law enforcement officials/agencies to successfully investigate and prosecute criminal cases.

Increased number of arrests and successful prosecutions of drug traffickers.

Transformational Diplomacy

Counternarcotics assistance advances the Peace and Security objective of strengthening the rule of law by enhancing the ability of law enforcement to dismantle international narco-trafficking organizations. Dominican police will receive training and technical assistance aimed at building/improving their capacity to intercept drug shipments and to conduct investigations that lead to the arrest and prosecution of narco-traffickers and money launderers.

Program Justification

The Dominican Republic is a major drug transit country in the Caribbean and Dominicans operate major trafficking organizations in the United States – particularly on the East Coast. According to the U.S. Joint Interagency Task Force –South (JIATF-S) the number of suspect drug flights from Venezuela to Hispaniola increased by 38 percent from 2006 to 2007 – approximately two thirds of the flights went to the DR.

Program Accomplishments

In 2007, Dominican authorities seized approximately four metric tons of cocaine, 102.5 kilograms (kg) of heroin, 17,902 units of MDMA, and 511.7 kg of marijuana. In November, the National Drug Control Directorate (DNCD), in coordination with the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), interdicted an airdrop of drugs, seizing more than 220 kg of cocaine. The DNCD made 12,841 drug-related arrests in 2007. Of these, 12,510 were Dominican nationals and 331 were foreigners. The DEA executed a joint, interagency-coordinated counter-drug operation called “Rum Punch” with U.S. Mission agencies, the DNCD and other Dominican military branches focusing on the movement of drugs, money and chemicals between source zones and the United States. The operation included maritime and air assets from the U.S., British and Dominican militaries. The operation succeeded in temporarily stopping flights from Venezuela.

FY 2009 Program

Narcotics Law Enforcement

This project will focus on improving the ability of the GODR to gather intelligence on, investigate, and prosecute drug smugglers through training, technical assistance and support to the DNCD vetted unit and the canine unit. Funds will also be used to improve data collection and analysis capabilities of the Port police and to provide surveillance equipment for port security.

In addition, funds will be used to provide training and technical assistance to the Dominican National Police in capacity building. Police personnel will be trained to properly investigate complex criminal cases such as organized crime, money laundering, and related crimes.

Anti-Money Laundering

Training and mentoring in the development and prosecution of complex financial investigations will be provided to police investigators and prosecutors.

Program Development and Support (PD&S)

PD&S funds are used for the salaries, benefits, allowances, and travel of direct hire U.S. and foreign national personnel, International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) costs, and other general administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation.

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Dominican Republic
INL BUDGET
($000)

FY 2007
FY 2008
FY 2009
Narcotics Law Enforcement

Port Security
-
50
100

Domestic Violence
30
60

Police Reform
-
200
275

Illegal Migration
-
62
90

Vetted Unit
-
150
225

Sub Total
-
492
750
Money Laundering
-
100
-
Program Development and Support

U.S. Personnel
-
200
200

Non-U.S. Personnel
-
50
50

ICASS Costs
-
150
150

Program Support
-
-
-

Sub-Total
-
400
400
Total
-
992
1,150


Eastern Caribbean

Budget Summary ($000)


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FY 2007 Actual

FY 2008 Enacted

FY 2009 Request

---

496

500

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Augment ability of responsible agencies to investigate, prosecute, seize criminal assets, interdict illicit drug and chemical shipments, and control money laundering.

Increased number of interdictions and quantity of drugs and contraband seized.

Increased number of arrests and successful prosecutions of drug traffickers and money launderers.

Increased amount and value of illicit assets seized and forfeited.

Transformational Diplomacy

In the area of interdiction, INL funding contributes to the Peace and Security objective by enhancing the capacity of Eastern Caribbean law enforcement to counter drug trafficking and related crimes such as money laundering, arms trafficking and corruption. The Eastern Caribbean remains a vulnerable platform from which transnational criminals can threaten the security interests of the U.S. Funds will be used for specialized training and technical assistance for criminal and money laundering investigations and also support the maritime drug interdiction operations of the Regional Security System (RSS) defense and police forces.

Program Justification

The principal U.S. interests in the seven countries of the Eastern Caribbean – Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Dominica, Grenada, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent and the Grenadines – are preventing and combating transnational criminal activity against the United States, including terrorism, narcotics trafficking, alien smuggling, and financial crimes. These Eastern Caribbean countries make up a significant portion of the “third border” of the United States which is a transit zone for drugs -- mostly cocaine and marijuana products, going from South America to the United States, Europe and other markets.

Program Accomplishments

In 2007, Antigua and Barbuda forces seized 5.7 kilograms (kg) of cocaine and 464 kg of marijuana, arrested 134 persons on drug-related charges, and prosecuted six traffickers. Barbados reported seizing 228.6 kg of cocaine and 4,194 kg of marijuana and arrested four major traffickers. Grenadian authorities reported seizing approximately 935.8 kg of cocaine, 9,824 marijuana plants, 260 kg of marijuana, and 1,686 marijuana cigarettes. They arrested 382 people on drug-related charges, 356 men and 26 women, including two major traffickers. Dominican law enforcement agencies reported seizing 353 kg of cocaine and 181 kg of marijuana – down substantially from 2006. Dominica Police arrested 217 persons on drug-related charges, and prosecuted eight major drug traffickers. The Government of St. Lucia (GOSL) Police reported seizing 792.5 kg of cocaine in 2007, up from 50.7 kg in 2006. The GOSL also seized 793 kg of marijuana in 2007, up from 515.8 kg in 2006.

FY 2009 Program

Narcotics Law Enforcement/Interdiction

The DEA-led “Operation Reef Shark” targets trafficking organizations using specially selected and vetted law enforcement personnel from the islands to conduct investigations aimed dismantling their operations. In FY 2009, funding will provide technical assistance and training to the police participating in Reef Shark. FY 2009 funding will also support the maintenance of the boats donated in previous years and training for the maritime interdiction units.

Money Laundering

Funding will be used for the mentoring of financial investigators and prosecutors involved in developing and prosecuting money laundering cases. Department of Treasury financial mentors will make periodic visits to the seven Financial Investigative Units in the Eastern Caribbean.

Program Development and Support (PD&S)

PD&S funds will be used to pay salaries, allowances, and benefits of foreign national direct hire employees in the Narcotics Affairs Section. In addition, funds pay for International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) costs and other general administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation.

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Eastern Caribbean
INL BUDGET
($000)


FY 2007
FY 2008
FY 2009
Narcotics Law Enforcement

Law Enforcement/Interdiction
-
200
230

Sub-Total
-
200
230
Money Laundering
96
70
Program Development and Support

Non-U.S. Personnel
-
50
50

ICASS Costs
-
150
150

Program Support
-
-
-

Sub-Total
-
200
200
Total

-
496
500


El Salvador

Budget Summary ($000)

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FY 2007 Actual

FY 2008 Estimate

FY 2009 Request

250 *

744

800

* FY 2007 funding for El Salvador is accounted for in the Caribbean and Central America Regional account.

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Enhance the abilities of the Government of El Salvador (GOES) law enforcement agencies to detect and interdict trafficked drugs.

Increased number of interdictions.

Increased quantity of seized drugs.

Increased arrests and convictions for gang related crime.

Deter gang crime through improved investigations and improved prison management.

Decrease in gang-related prison violence.

Decrease in prison-based crime.

Transformational Diplomacy

El Salvador is a Transforming Country, as it a low-income country that meets the Millennium Challenge goals. The program in El Salvador supports the Peace and Security Goal, addressing Narcotics Interdiction and Organized and Gang-Related Crime by improving the ability of the GOES law enforcement capacity to combat narcotics trafficking and transnational gangs.

Program Justification

El Salvador is a transit point for cocaine and heroin that flow through the Eastern Pacific and by land. El Salvador’s public security is threatened by criminal youth gangs that commit extortion, murder and other violent crimes, including some committed from within prisons. The Salvadoran police, prosecutors and prevention agencies do not have the training or equipment to adequately prevent gang crime or to apprehend and successfully prosecute gang criminals. They also need to amplify the exchange of information with neighboring countries and the United States to detain criminals who slip between countries unimpeded. Prison officials need training in management of prison populations to separate out vulnerable juveniles and control hardened criminals.

Program Accomplishments

In 2007 the GOES targeted maritime trafficking along its coastline and overland transit routes, as well as narcotics-related money laundering operations. The Anti-Narcotics Division (DAN) of the National Civilian Police (PNC) focused on overland transportation, commercial air, package delivery services, and maritime transportation in the Gulf of Fonseca resulting in the seizure of four metric tons of cocaine. The Financial Investigative Unit (FIU) of the Attorney General's office monitored suspicious financial activity and investigated suspected instances of money laundering and associated financial crime resulting in the seizure of assets valued at $1.4 million.

FY 2009 Program

Interdiction

Funds will strengthen land interdiction programs to increase detection capacity and complement Salvadoran collaboration with USG maritime operations. Funds will support the purchase of additional canines for the DAN, as well as USG law enforcement agency-sponsored certification, refresher training, and spot purchases of equipment such as radios and dog training tools for the DAN K-9 unit. INL will also work with DHS and DEA to provide customs and border security training to Salvadoran counterparts.

This project complements Merida Initiative requests which, in El Salvador, will enhance border security and interdiction by providing inspection equipment and training. Merida projects will support interdiction by providing technological tools for information development and exchange (fingerprint analysis, vetted units, drug and INTERPOL networks) and support maritime interdiction through repairs and new patrol boats and communications and safety equipment. Police will receive protective equipment, communications equipment, and vehicles. Training will also be provided for asset forfeiture, court personnel and prosecutors, and for arms control.

Merida funds have also been requested for the International Law Enforcement Academy located in El Salvador to construct barracks for students who currently must stay in hotels, and to cover training courses in a wide variety of police and anti-gang topics for the region.

Transnational Gangs

Funds will focus on investigation of gang-related crime, and on improved management of prison populations to complement the Criminal Youth Gangs Program and requested funding for the Gangs Strategy Implementation under the Merida Initiative. Support will fund El Salvador-specific equipment and training for the GOES Transnational Anti-Gang Unit (TAG), including case management software, protective gear for police, and law enforcement operations training. The requested funding complements regional anti-gang program initiatives to provide training and technical assistance designed to address gang problems common to El Salvador’s neighbors.

Funds will also expand the pilot Prison Management Training Program initiated at the end of FY 2007 to improve the level of security in Salvadoran prisons where transnational street gang members are incarcerated. Training and mentoring of prison staff will significantly improve staff operations and professionalism. Work with prison officials will improve management of the system and mechanisms to separate youthful offenders from gang leaders. Training will focus on basic security and control operations in the prisons and strategic and tactical planning for prison managers. It will also include training and equipment for quick reaction forces.

This program complements requests for training and technical assistance in the Merida Initiative to enhance gang prevention and law enforcement, including prisons, as well as community prevention activities to dissuade youth from joining gangs, juvenile rehabilitation and a related regional drug demand reduction program through the Organization of American States Inter-American Commission on Drug Abuse Control (OAS/CICAD).

Program Development and Support

Funds will support general administrative and operational expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation.

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El Salvador
INL BUDGET
($000)

FY 2007
FY 2007
Supp

FY 2008
FY 2009
Narcotics Law Enforcement

Port and Airport Security
-
-
100
-

Border Security
-
-
178
-

Intelligence Fusion and Analysis
-
-
200
-

Interdiction
-
-
-
200

Sub Total
-
-
478
200


Transnational Crime

Gangs
-
-
-
435


Program Development and Support

U.S. Personnel
-
-
61
-

Non-U.S. Personnel
-
-
60
-

ICASS Costs
-
-
145
-

Program Support
-
-
-
165

Sub-Total
-
-
266
165
Total

-
-
744
800


Guatemala

Budget Summary ($000)

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FY 2007 Actual

FY 2008 Estimate

FY 2009 Request

2,475

3,472

5,320

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators
Build the investigative and operational capacity of Guatemalan law enforcement agencies capacity to effectively disrupt drug trafficking, trans-border crime, and illicit crop production in Guatemala.
Improved drug seizure levels.

Increased prosecution and investigation of money laundering cases.

All Guatemalan law enforcement officers in supported units will be vetted.

Increased arrests, prosecution and conviction of narcotraffickers.

Surveys show a declining rate of drug use in populations served by demand reduction programs.

Gang-related crime drops in areas served by the Government of Guatemala (GOG) integrated gang program.

Anti-Gang program is expanded to additional areas.

Youth enrolled in gang-prevention programs remain uninvolved in gangs.
Transformational Diplomacy

Guatemala falls in the developing country category--it is a low-income country not yet meeting Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) performance criteria. The goal for Peace and Security is to address two key challenges in Guatemala, both of which have a direct impact on the United States: interdiction of drugs flowing through Guatemala to the United States; and stopping transnational gang crime by improved law enforcement and prevention. For Governing Justly and Democratically, INL supports legislative and judicial reforms leading to improved law enforcement and less corruption.

Program Justification

Guatemala sits at a crucial position on the transit corridor for drugs flowing from South America to the United States. The USG estimates indicate that 90 percent of drugs reaching the United States are shipped by land, air and sea through the Central American corridor to Mexico and the United States. Widespread poverty and economic inequality complicate the fight against drug transshipment, alien smuggling and other transnational crimes, and the concomitant corruption. Transnational youth gangs are a large component of the public security crisis that dominates public concern. Gang crime affects the region and the United States.

The new administration of President Colon has vowed to reduce poverty and crime, and has taken a public stand against corruption. However drug seizures lag. Youth gangs continue to spread beyond the capital to regional cities and rural areas, bringing extortion, crime and violence. There has been a resurgence of opium poppy cultivation in small plots in remote areas which the GOG eradicates regularly. GOG narcotics control police carry out manual eradication, interdiction, port control operations, narcotics investigations, and road interdiction and inspection functions. INL funds help support all of these activities.

Program Accomplishments

There have been a number of policy advances, as well as law enforcement accomplishments. The GOG strengthened the rule of law through ratification of the Commission Against Impunity (CICIG), established an autonomous forensics lab, put the Organized Crime bill into effect, drafted a comprehensive extradition law, and appointed special judges to issue warrants in sensitive cases.

In September 2007, the Guatemalan Supreme Court approved the appointment of twelve itinerate judges with nation-wide jurisdiction to issue sensitive search warrants in narcotics and money laundering cases. This will provide the timely issuance of search warrants and reduce the threat of leaks of information and corruption that had previously undermined narcotics investigations.

Land interdiction is still not satisfactory--seizures in 2007 totaled 730 kg of cocaine. However, the GOG has attempted to correct some of this problem by purging the police of corrupt officers. A total of 1,215 police officers were removed from the police in 2007, primarily for corruption. In late 2007, the GOG changed the leadership of their counternarcotics effort, the drug police and the ports police.

FY 2009 Program

Narcotics Project

In 2007, the anti-drug police unit, the SAIA, was fully vetted and polygraphed. In 2009, the USG will support the SAIA with training; technical assistance; and equipment, such as field drug test kits, computers, radios, several replacement vehicles; and operational support/oversight. Funds will also support training for police investigators, prosecutors and judges in modern techniques of gathering and analyzing data to increase evidence-based seizures, arrests and convictions.

The vetting process has also been applied to the ports police (DIPA) program and FY 2009 funding will continue support for vetting, as well as provide equipment, such as x-ray cargo scanners and computers. Training and technical assistance will be provided in areas such as port security, cargo inspection, electronic manifest review, document analysis, passenger screening, border interdiction operations and related airport, seaport and border operations. The USG will also assist the government of Guatemala to expand inspection and analysis operations to other strategic areas of the country on the long border with Mexico used by drug traffickers by providing logistical support for bilateral and multi-lateral counternarcotics missions, such as “Mayan Jaguar” and “Central Skies,” as well as technical and logistical support for opium poppy reconnaissance and eradication operations.

Guatemala will also participate in regional programs funded by the Merida Initiative. This request complements Merida Initiative requests for border and ports security; interdiction support, including technological tools for information development and exchange (fingerprint analysis, vetted units, drug and INTERPOL networks); maritime interdiction support through repairs to existing boats, new patrol boats and communications and safety equipment; and police protective equipment, communications equipment, vehicles, asset forfeiture training and training in methods to combat arms trafficking by the Regional Firearms advisor.

Law Enforcement Development Project

This project works with a model precinct to develop better policing to combat crime, especially gang-based crime and violence. Funding will support replicating the program in additional municipalities. The program improves police and prosecutor skills and coordination, involves communities in crime monitoring and reporting, and strengthens police accountability and transparency.

The funding also complements the regional anti-gang program which provides training and technical assistance to address gang problems common to Guatemala’s neighbors as well as the Merida Initiative request, which seeks to replicate the Villa Nueva model in other countries of the region, and enhance gang prevention and law enforcement, including prisons.

The newly implemented CRADIC information system will provide the necessary information to improve patrolling coverage, improve the quality of investigations, more reliable statistical data for deployment of police personnel and strategic planning. CRADIC is also the platform from which information will be disseminated nationally and internationally and is the key to coordinating the investigation of transnational crimes. Funds will pay for maintenance and upgrades for equipment, computer hardware and software and training for police who will use the system.

Demand Reduction Project

Domestic drug use continues to be growing threat. Traffickers supply drugs as payment for services, increasing domestic supply, and gangs have become involved in retail drug sales. The Guatemala Demand Reduction Project will work with a re-vitalized SECCATID (the GOG demand reduction agency) to refocus efforts towards closer cooperation with the police. This will be complemented by OAS-CICAD regional demand reduction training requested under the Merida Initiative. The newly-formed Police Athletic League program will move past the trial stage during the course of the year, replicating the program in at least three additional areas by year-end. This program targets youth at risk for drug use and gang membership. USG support will enable SECCATID to work more closely with eradication teams to provide anti-cultivation and anti-drug abuse messages along with school and sports supplies to rural communities affected by poppy eradication missions.

Rule of Law/Prosecutors Project

Guatemala has advanced in the prosecution of money laundering and narcotics cases and in enacting the legal framework needed to strengthen investigations and prosecutions. Nevertheless, no major drug traffickers or perpetrators of money laundering crimes have been investigated or convicted. The Prosecutor Assistance project will continue working with the Public Ministry’s (Attorney General) special prosecutors units (counternarcotics, anti-money laundering and anti-corruption units) to improve capabilities to conduct investigations that would lead to the prosecution of major trafficking organizations. The program will enhance investigative methods, complex case development and processing, through specialized inter-agency training. This includes technical assistance in applying best practices to ensure effective and transparent procedures for special investigators and their assistants. Guatemalan courts and prosecutors will benefit from regional training requested under the Merida Initiative.

Anti-Corruption Reform (Good Governance)

Funds will provide training, technical assistance, and computer hardware and software for the anti-corruption and anti-money laundering prosecutors units of the Public Ministry. This assistance will help them implement better interagency coordination and resource allocation procedures.

Program Development and Support

Funds will support salaries, benefits and allowances of U.S. and foreign national direct hire and contract personnel, International Cooperative Administrative Support Service (ICASS) costs and general administrative and operational expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation.

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Guatemala
INL BUDGET
($000)


FY 2007
FY 2008
FY 2009
Counternarcotics/Interdiction

Narcotics Interdiction
300
600
1,010

Institutional Development
590
550
1,010
Sub Total
890
1,150
2,020
Eradication
100
250
250
Transnational Crime

Financial Crime
-
-
50

Organized/Gang Related Crime
-
1,072
2,000
Sub Total
-
1,072
2,050
Administration of Justice
350
250
250
Drug Awareness/Demand Reduction
130
100
100
Program Development and Support

U.S. Personnel
*320
250
150

Non-U.S. Personnel
110
113
200

ICASS Costs
270
187
270

Program Support
30
100
30

Sub-Total
730
650
650
Total
2,200
3,472
5,320

* Transfer Cost of Incoming Director included.


Haiti

Budget Summary ($000)

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FY 2007 Actual

FY 2008 Estimate

FY 2009 Request

14,850

8,927

15,000

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Effective law enforcement and public order in Haiti significantly reduces the attractiveness of illegal migration and the ability of criminals to traffic drugs into the Unites Sates, while promoting economic development and long-term stability.

Existing and 1,000 newly recruited Haitian National Police (HNP) will continue to be vetted and trained to democratic policing standards to form the core of a credible, competent police force. Haitian police will be able to respond to reports of crime in a timely manner, conduct effective patrols, direct traffic, communicate effectively, and conduct internal and criminal investigations, with crime reducing over time. Incidences of human rights abuses by police will decrease.

Up to 50 U.S. police officers and three U.S. corrections officers continue to serve in Haiti under the auspices of the UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH), helping to maintain law and order, and advising, training, vetting, restructuring, and monitoring the HNP.

As citizens begin to have confidence in the police as an institution, reporting of crime will increase, as will police capability to respond. Security on the streets will improve, as measured by a return to normal business and reduction of daily gunfire.

The HNP counterdrug unit investigates and makes arrests of drug traffickers in cases that lead to prosecutions.

Drug seizures and drug trafficking arrests increase. The flow of drugs through Haiti declines.

Financial Investigative Unit (FIU) investigations lead to prosecutions and convictions, of money launderers, corrupt individuals and government officials.

The volume and the value of assets seized increases.

Transformational Diplomacy

Improved security is critical to strengthening democracy, providing stability, establishing an environment for economic growth and investment, improving respect for human rights, and reducing drug trafficking, illegal immigration, and other transnational crime. The INL police reform, corrections reform and counternarcotics assistance program supports the Peace and Security objective by focusing on the development of an honest, professional and effective police and corrections force. INL funds 50 police officers and three corrections officers in support of the UN Mission who train, mentor and provide operational support for the HNP and Haitian Prison Administration. To stem the drug flow through Haiti, we have partnerships with Haitian authorities and are creating institutions to fight both drug trafficking and related money laundering. We will continue to support DEA’s vetted counterdrug units and the development of the Haitian Coast Guard’s interdiction capability, as well as the efforts of the government’s Financial Investigative Unit to combat money laundering and corruption. The criminal justice program supports the Governing Justly and Democratically objective by improving the infrastructure and management of the prison system.

Program Justification

Strengthening Haiti’s law enforcement capacity and supporting the HNP’s on-going reform efforts are key U.S. priorities. The HNP has little real capacity to investigate or respond to crimes, patrol, keep public order or even communicate internally. These basic prerequisites are lacking throughout Haiti, but particularly in Port-au-Prince slums which are the epicenter of anti-government and criminal activity. It is estimated that eighty metric tons of cocaine from South America transits the island of Hispaniola on its way to U.S. markets. Cocaine arrives in Haiti by go-fast boats, other vessels and by small aircraft. It is then shipped onward by sea in vessels or containers or by land through the Dominican Republic. In addition to posing problems for the U.S., the drug trade in Haiti undermines the rule of law in that fragile country by fostering corruption and fomenting armed violence perpetrated by criminal gangs.

Stability in Haiti will contribute to its economic growth, enhancing security in the region and diminishing the attractiveness of illegal migration to the United States. To help achieve stability, INL will continue to support peacekeeping operations, including by providing U.S. police and corrections officers to the civilian police and corrections component of MINUSTAH, the lead player in HNP and corrections reform and retraining. U.S. support for MINUSTAH is pivotal to the mission’s success.

Program Accomplishments

To become a credible and competent police force, the HNP requires extensive training, mentoring and vetting. The U.S. assisted MINUSTAH and the GOH in providing training and vetting support for over 2,000 new recruits and existing officers in 2007. The U.S. provided operational support to the police academy as well as basic non-lethal personal equipment and uniforms for recruits upon graduation. The U.S. provided forensics training and equipment, as well as training on, and provision of, appropriate non-lethal means of responding to crisis situations.

The U.S. also greatly enhanced the operational capacity of the HNP, with the provision of communications links at individual police stations throughout Haiti to enable communications between officers in stations and the field, along with motorcycles and trucks for officers to patrol and respond to crisis situations. The U.S. began negotiating with the HNP to support reform efforts in Cite de Soleil, including refurbishment and construction of up to three critical police stations, and provision of equipment and vehicles for police.

This assistance enabled the HNP to achieve some success in the counternarcotics area. During 2006, DEA vetted and trained the HNP counter drug unit (BLTS), conducted limited drug interdiction operations, and selected the members of a Sensitive Investigative Unit that became operational in 2007. The Haitian Coast Guard conducted patrols and participated in a drug interdiction operation from its Killick base in Port-au-Prince. It also reestablished operations at its renovated based in Cap Haitien. DEA-provided air assets working with JIATF-S air and maritime assets assisted the GOH in stopping air deliveries to Haiti. Through October 10, 2007, 914 kilos of cocaine and marijuana were seized.

In April 2007, the Center for Information and Joint Coordination (French acronym CICC), under the Ministry of Interior, became fully operational. The Center is tasked with conducting investigations, research, data collection, information sharing and international and regional coordination related to drug trafficking in/through Haiti. It has 26 staff personnel assigned, including 16 investigators. It has established the Anti-Drug Task Force consisting of all the agencies within the Government of Haiti (GOH) that deal with aspects of drug trafficking, money laundering, border control and law enforcement. It is also working to establish greater bilateral cooperation with the Dominican Republic, signing a joint agreement in November to fight drug trafficking and other crimes.

FY 2009 Program

The FY 2009 program focuses on police reform (crime control assistance), corrections (criminal justice assistance), and counternarcotics. These programs began in 2004 and are proceeding in cooperation with the Haitian Government, MINUSTAH, and other donors.

Crime Control

Civilian Police: INL will continue support for up to 50 U.S. police and three corrections officers the U.S. is contributing to the MINUSTAH stabilization mission. U.S. officers will continue providing expertise in the areas of academy training, field training, patrols, community policing, investigations, traffic, crime analysis, forensics, police management, supervisory skills, police administration, and other specialized skills. U.S. CIVPOL officers will continue to monitor the HNP to discourage and report human rights violations. They will also continue to co-locate with Haitian officers in their stations and engage in joint patrols, to increase public confidence in the police.

Training and Equipment: The U.S. and our donor partners estimate that 14,000 HNP are needed to provide public order in Haiti and believe a force this size is sustainable over the long term. Funds will be used to continue assisting the HNP to recruit, select and train a minimum of 1,000 qualified officers in FY 2009. Specialized units, including forensics, SWAT, and traffic will be strengthened by provision of technical assistance and trained. HNP supervisory, management, and human rights training will be provided as well as periodic in-service training for existing HNP officers. Together with that training, we will provide appropriate equipment, including uniforms, basic personal gear, office supplies and training aids to support the HNP academy.

Police Accountability and Reform: Corruption is a major problem within the HNP. Targeted assistance will be given to support modernization of the Administration Department of the HNP to permit computerized inventory control and transparency in the procurement, usage and disposal of equipment.

Crime Control/Forensics: Upgrades to existing police infrastructure and equipment combined with targeted training and vetting will continue. Training will be provided on the operation of police stations and on the basics of community policing. The U.S. will also provide support to assist the HNP in establishing a maintenance garage to enable them to maintain equipment donated by the U.S. and others. The U.S. will continue to assist in forensic training and the development of HNP capacities for crime analysis. The U.S. will also help train the HNP to be able to respond to civil disturbances in a manner that takes advantage of non-lethal police tactics.

Criminal Justice

Corrections: FY 2009 funds will continue efforts to renovate deteriorating structures that present security and disease threats to detainees, and to alleviate the serious human rights violations currently presented by jail conditions. The corrections effort also includes the development of a program to equip and train Haitian prison personnel to operate a pre-trial diversion program and to educate and rehabilitate some of the criminal population.

Counternarcotics

Special Counterdrug Units: The HNP counterdrug unit (BLTS) currently has 45-50 officers vetted by DEA. Funds in FY 2009 will be used to expand the unit and provide additional training and equipment, such as a radio for each officer. DEA also supervises a Sensitive Investigative Unit (SIU) of specially selected and trained officers who conduct special operations and collect intelligence against the major traffickers in Haiti. FY 2009 funding will provide operational support such as fuel for deployment of elements of both units throughout the country.

Haitian Coast Guard (HCG): FY 2009 funds will provide specialized training in port security and maritime interdiction operations at the HCG bases at Killick and Cap Haitien. In partnership with the U.S. Coast Guard, funds will continue the ongoing effort to restore and upgrade the logistical and maintenance capacity of the HCG. Additional vessels will be provided consistent with HCG capacity to maintain and operate them.

Central Financial Intelligence Unit (UCREF): In 2007, the UCREF was reorganized into separate intelligence gathering and investigative entities. FY 2009 funds will provide technical assistance and financial investigation mentors to support the anti-money laundering and anti-corruption efforts of the UCREF.

Program Development and Support (PD&S)

PD&S funds are used for the salaries, benefits, allowances, and travel of direct hire and contract U.S. and foreign national personnel, International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) costs and other general administrative and operating expenses for counternarcotics and anticrime program planning, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation.

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Haiti
INL BUDGET
($000)

FY 2007
FY 2007
Supp

FY 2008
FY 2009
Civilian Police Program
6,500
-
3,450
9,000
Police Development and Reform

Training and Equipment
3,500
-
1,650
1,090

Police Accountability and Reform
800
-
500
500

Crime Prevention/Forensics
800
-
700
500

Sub Total
5,100
-
2,850
2,090
Criminal Justice Development

Corrections
1,000
-
177
920

Sub Total
1,000
-
177
920
Counterdrug Support

Marine Interdiction
650
-
600
930

Anti-Money Laundering
350
-
400
380

DEA Vetted Unit
500
-
750
930

Sub-Total
1,500
-
1,750
2,240
Program Development and Support

U.S. Personnel
510
-
411
500

Non-U.S. Personnel
60
-
60
70

ICASS Costs
145
-
224
145

Program Support
35
-
5
35

Sub-Total
750
-
700
750
Total

14,850
-
8,927
15,000


Honduras

Budget Summary ($000)

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FY 2007 Actual

FY 2008 Estimate

FY 2009 Request

250 *

744

750

* FY 2007 funding for Honduras is accounted for in the Caribbean and Central America Regional account.

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Enhance the abilities of the Government of Honduras (GOH) law enforcement agencies to detect and intercept shipments and detain traffickers.

Increased number of interdictions and quantity of drugs and contraband seized.

Increased number of arrests of drug traffickers and money launderers.

Improve GOH ability to prevent gang crime through improved policing.

Decreased gang-related crime.

Reform management of prisons to separate out youthful offenders and prevent prison-based crime.

Consistent implementation of prison management reforms and procedures.

Transformational Diplomacy

This assistance advances the Transformational Diplomacy goals of Peace and Security. Honduras is a Transforming Country as it is a low-income country, but has met Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) performance criteria for policy reforms. Under the Peace and Security Objective, INL will address key challenges to security and law enforcement that affect both Honduras and the United States: interdiction of drugs flowing through Honduras by air, sea or land, and the lack of public security because of gang-related and other organized crime.

Program Justification

Honduras’s geographic location makes it a transit point for narcotics trafficking, alien smuggling, trafficking in persons, and other organized crime activities that overwhelm law enforcement and judicial systems. Honduras does not have adequate police per capita, and existing forces are inadequately trained and equipped. This contributes to Honduras’s inability to interdict the transshipment of drugs or to address the increase in violence fueled by gangs. Transforming the police is the first required step to asserting control. Honduras also requires country-specific assistance to anti-gang units to complement the regional training provided under the regional gangs program. Honduras’s two major cities are wracked by gang-related violence, and authorities only marginally control prisons where gang members are incarcerated.

Program Accomplishments

As part of a plan to improve the National Police, the force added 2,000 police officers, decentralized some police commands, and began conducting polygraph tests on all applicants to the police academy. During 2007, the National Police of Honduras seized almost four metric tons of cocaine and collaborated with USG programs detecting maritime shipments. With INL seed-funding gang prevention activities were initiated in five communities of Tegucigalpa.

FY 2009 Program

Narcotics Law Enforcement

The program will focus on basic police abilities through improved new-entry and in-service training of police. This will complement the separately-funded program to provide technical assistance to the police academy in 2008. Training and technical assistance will focus on first responders to crimes, narcotics detection, and investigative techniques.

This complements inspection equipment and training support requested for Honduras under the Merida Initiative to enhance border security and interdiction. The Merida Initiative request for Honduras also includes technological tools for information development and exchange (fingerprint analysis, vetted units, drug and INTERPOL networks), as well as maritime interdiction support through repairs of existing boats, new patrol boats, and communications and safety equipment. It also requests protective equipment, communications equipment, and vehicles for police, asset forfeiture training, training for court personnel and prosecutors, and anti arms trafficking training by the regional firearms advisor.

Transnational Gangs and Organized Crime

Funds will complement the regional gangs program by supporting Honduras-specific gang prevention and law enforcement initiatives. This includes provision of equipment such as police protective wear, communications and computers, and training for anti-gang and other units that target organized and transnational crime, as well as related justice sector institutions such as juvenile justice systems. FY 2009 funds will also provide additional training to complement the proposed Merida Initiative prison management reform project and anti-gang assistance in the form of training and technical assistance and community prevention activities.

Program Development and Support

Funds will support salaries, benefits and allowances of two foreign national personnel, International Cooperative Administrative Support Service (ICASS) costs and general administrative and operational expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation.

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Honduras
INL BUDGET
($000)


FY 2007
FY 2008
FY 2009
Narcotics Law Enforcement/Operations

Interdiction
-
608
385

Sub-Total
-
608
385
Transnational Crime

Gangs
-
-
200

Sub-Total
-
-
200
Program Development and Support
-
-

Non-U.S. Personnel
-
28
30

ICASS Costs
-
92
119

Program Support
-
16
16

Sub-Total
-
136
165
Total

-
744
750



Jamaica

Budget Summary ($000)

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FY 2007 Actual

FY 2008 Estimate

FY 2009 Request

900

992

1,010

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Enhance the abilities of Government of Jamaica’s (GOJ) law enforcement agencies to detect and intercept shipments and detain traffickers.

Increase interdiction activities by making key arrests of drug traffickers and dismantling at least one major trafficking organization.

Participate in at least one regional drug interdiction exercise, to promote counternarcotics cooperation in the Caribbean.

Sustain improvements in law enforcement capabilities in Jamaica through the modernization and professionalization of the Jamaican Constabulary Force (JCF), while maintaining a strong and corruption-free law enforcement institution.

Implement reform recommendations of the Ministry of National Security’s Strategic Review of the Jamaica Constabulary Force, including the ability to dismiss and prosecute corrupt police officers regardless of rank; and the vetting of both current officers and new recruits.

Undertake thorough investigations into allegations of police corruption, regardless of rank, and create a special prosecutor for public corruption cases.

Transformational Diplomacy

Jamaica faces the pressures of narcotics trafficking, money laundering, corruption and crime that undermine the rule of law and democratic governance. The FY 2009 program will advance the Transformational Diplomacy Peace and Security objective by promoting law enforcement cooperation and reinforcing Jamaican police and military drug interdiction capabilities. The program will advance the Governing Justly and Democratically objective by supporting anti-corruption reforms within the Jamaican police and by providing training and technical assistance to the Public Prosecutor’s office.

Program Justification

Jamaica is a transshipment point for South American cocaine to U.S. and European markets. It is the largest marijuana producer and exporter in the Caribbean. Traffickers use Jamaica’s offshore waters, ports and airstrips to move drugs to the United States. In 2007, an increase in murder and other violent crime coupled with a thriving “guns for ganja” trade between Jamaica and its neighbors, continued to tax a law enforcement and judicial system burdened by inefficiency and corruption. The Jamaican government is publicly committed to combating all illegal drug-related criminal activity. USG and other donors assistance is essential for the GOJ to develop and sustain counter-drug/crime capability.

U.S. counternarcotics assistance seeks, through the provision of equipment, technical assistance and training, to help the JCF, the Jamaica Defense Force (JDF), Jamaica Customs, and other GOJ agencies reduce the flow of illegal drugs from Jamaica to the United States; to enhance Jamaica’s ability to disrupt and dismantle international criminal organizations; and to identify, target and eliminate those threats that pose the greatest danger to US national security interest. The program also provides assistance to strengthen the GOJ’s ability to counter public corruption and help facilitate the extradition of traffickers and other criminals to the United States.

Program Accomplishments

There is robust cooperation between U.S. and GOJ officials. The Jamaica Fugitive Apprehension Team (JFAT) received specialized training, equipment, guidance and operational support in 2007, enabling it to work with U.S. Marshals stationed in Kingston on a daily basis. In 2007, the JFAT closed 63 cases regarding U.S. fugitives, made eight arrests and facilitated 10 extraditions and two deportations.

The GOJ participated in joint deployments with the USG in Jamaican waters during 2007 under the auspices of “Operation Riptide,” which allow both nations to conduct law enforcement operations within each other's maritime zones and is authorized under the Joint Jamaica-United States Maritime Cooperation Agreement. The JDF also continued to work with the USG's Joint Interagency Task Force-South (JIATF-S) in 2007 to disrupt maritime trafficking. JDF and JCF elements participated in the DEA-led regional exercise "All-Inclusive".

While hampered by internal corruption and a lack of sufficient resources, the JCF and JDF continued to give priority to counternarcotics missions in 2007 and seized 41.4 metric tons (MT) of cannabis and 98 kilograms of cocaine.

Operation Kingfish, a multinational task force (GOJ, U.S., United Kingdom and Canada) to attack the core of drug-trafficking and other criminal organizations, celebrated its third anniversary in 2007 and mounted 864 operations.

FY 2009 Program

Funds will permit the GOJ to undertake an integrated set of counter-drug, anti-money laundering and anti-corruption efforts:

Law Enforcement

These projects strengthen the GOJ law enforcement capability to interdict the shipment of illegal drugs and identify, investigate and prosecute drug traffickers, money launderers and other international criminals and dismantle their criminal organizations. The focus of efforts will be to decrease the use of Jamaican territory as a transit point for cocaine and to stop the “guns for ganja” trade. Funds will provide training; equipment, such as night vision goggles for the JDF Airwing to increase its capacity to fly nighttime interdiction missions, communications and surveillance equipment, and a mobile x-ray scanner for the Customs Contraband Enforcement Team. INL will also provide ten vehicles to Jamaican law enforcement entities engaged in port and border security operations. Interdiction funding will also support vetting and training of the Airport Interdiction Task Force Teams in Kingston and Montego Bay. Funds will also be used to purchase a surveillance vehicle for the vetted unit and the JDF Military Intelligence Unit and to purchase computers for the Narcotics Police.

Good Governance

Funds will support the Tripartite Anti-Corruption Initiative, a U.S.-led initiative which partners with the United Kingdom and Canada to bolster the Government of Jamaica’s ability to root out corruption. Funds will provide operational and technical assistance and training for the JCF’s Anti-Corruption Division. Similar assistance will also be provided to the Ombudsman National Anti-Corruption Agency and the Anti-Corruption Special Prosecutor.

Rule of Law

Funds will provide training to strengthen the capacity of the Office of the Director of Public Prosecution (DPP) to prosecute complex drug cases. Funds will go towards case management software and equipment and computer equipment. A particular focus will be on increasing the GOJ’s capacity to prosecute money laundering and financial crimes and to develop skills to collect, preserve and use forensic evidence in criminal cases and in support of the forfeiture of criminal assets.

Transnational Crime

To improve Jamaica’s ability to investigate and prosecute financial crimes and stem the loss of government revenue due to corruption, funds funding will be used for training and commodity assistance such as computers and software upgrades for the Financial Investigations Division (FID) and the Revenue Protection Directorate of the Ministry of Finance. In addition, funds will support for the Jamaica Fugitive Apprehension Team (JFAT) by providing specialized training, operational support from U.S. Marshals stationed in Kingston, and one replacement vehicle.

Program Development and Support (PD&S)

PD&S funds cover the cost of salaries, benefits, and allowances of U.S. and foreign national direct hire personnel, field travel, International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) costs, and other general administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation.

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Jamaica
INL BUDGET
($000)

FY 2007
FY 2007
Supp

FY 2008
FY 2009
Narcotics Law Enforcement/Operations
500
-
300
200

Eradication
-
-
-
-

Interdiction
500
-
200
200

Border Control and Port Security
-
-
100
-
Transnational Crime
-
-
42
60

Money Laundering
-
-
42
60

Organized and Gang Crime
-
-

Rule of Law
-
50
50

Justice Reform
-
-
50
50
Good Governance
-
-
250
350

Anti-Corruption
250
350
Program Development and Support

U.S. Personnel
100
-
100
117

Non-U.S. Personnel
50
-
50
45

ICASS Costs
200
-
165
140

Program Support
50
-
35
48

Sub-Total
400
-
350
350
Total

900
-
992
1,010


Mexico

Budget Summary ($000)

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FY 2007 Actual

FY 2008 Estimate

FY 2008 Supp Request

FY 2009 Request

36,678

26,553

500,000

477,816*

*Includes Merida Initiative request of $450M

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Border and Port Security

Strengthen the Government of Mexico’s (GOM) ability to control its borders, ports of entry, and choke points within its national transportation system through the detection and interdiction of illicit narcotics, contraband (including explosives and weapons), trafficked/smuggled persons and individuals seeking to enter the United States to conduct terrorist activities.

More effective and rapid screening of cargo and vehicles (cars, trucks, trains) for contraband, illicit drugs and smuggled aliens; reduced delays of legitimate traffic moving north towards our common border.

Interdiction

Enhance the GOM’s capabilities to target the disruption of the command and control of Mexico’s drug trafficking organizations (DTOs). Expand the capacity of Mexican law enforcement agencies (LEAs) to interdict trafficked narcotics and precursors and the illicit proceeds that derive from them. Help Mexican authorities to develop their own means to handle HAZMAT associated with methamphetamine labs.

Increases in the volume of seized drugs and precursor chemicals, in the number of meth labs discovered and destroyed, in the amount of bulk cash seizures and in the number of trafficking-related arrests.

Establish interconnectivity between the respective command and control centers of Mexico's LEAs, to maximize coordination of joint operations and investigations.

Seamless use of information between the different databases supporting each of the operations centers will lead to more effective investigations and prosecutions.

Strengthening of intelligence efforts against criminal organizations.

Institution Building

Support the complete restructuring of the federal police force into a solitary command and promote the professionalization and modernization of Mexico’s law enforcement institutions and criminal justice sectors with a full range of training (courses for new recruits, specialized investigative and technical training, and management training) and support the development of federal police institutions and infrastructure.

Improved GOM capacity to conduct credible investigations based on forensic evidence to successfully prosecute criminal organizations.

Improved efficiency and effectiveness of criminal justice systems in the region to conduct credible investigations and successfully prosecute criminal organizations.

Promote the rule of law and protection of human rights through specialized investigative, technical, and management training.

Provide the GOM with means to build upon foundation laid in its creation of a Unified System of Crime Reporting (linking all police and prosecutors across entire country), of enhancing Office’s Operation Against Smugglers (and Traffickers) Initiative on Safety and Security (OASISS) project, of expanding its "digitalization" of cases within Office of the Attorney General (PGR).

Improve GOM capacity to apply advanced digital technologies to share, analyze and otherwise utilize and apply a variety of data, including crime reporting information.

Social Sector Support

Support demand reduction programs to educate the public about the harmful personal and societal effects of drug abuse and the growing gang problem. Support initiatives taken by the GOM, state governments and NGOs in prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation, particularly along the northern border with the United States.

National surveys identify those requiring assistance.

Expansion of demand reduction programs to educate the public about the harmful and societal effects of drug abuse and the growing threat of gang activity.

Transformational Diplomacy

The United States shares a broad commonality of interests with Mexico -- politically, economically and with regard to our own national security. Mexico long ago became the principal transit route for cocaine and is an important producer in its own right of the heroin, marijuana and methamphetamine consumed in the United States. The enormously corruptive influences of Mexico’s narcotics cartels touch the communities on both sides of our shared border. The absence of a transparent, readily accessible system of justice affects Mexico’s democratic stability and governability. The Calderón Administration has made enormous progress in reforming Mexico's juridical system from the ground up, diminishing its opaqueness and increasing its efficiency, and the years ahead offer significant opportunities to work together to attack our common foe. It is the highest priority for the United States to support Mexico's own efforts to build a dependable system of rule of law, to improve the security along our shared border and to create a stable society with the economic means that encourages job-creating investment. The Calderón Administration is eager to cooperate closely with the United States to achieve these ends.

Peace and Security: The extensive shared border, and the poverty that motivates millions to cross it illegally each year, places "peace and security" at the top of the list of U.S. transformational diplomacy priorities with regard to Mexico. Counternarcotics activities (including support for Mexico's interdiction and demand reduction activities, as well as Mexico's evolving anti-money laundering regime) are crucial, not only due to the damage that illegal drugs cause to both our societies , but also due to the threat that uncontrolled, well-financed criminality poses. U.S. long-term support for Mexico's restructuring of its police and prosecutorial institutions is key to enhancing Mexico's ability to address the security issues of greatest concern to the United States. U.S. support to Mexico's law enforcement entities will be oriented towards investments in their infrastructure and in training.

Governing Justly and Democratically: Our pursuit of transformational diplomacy will focus resources on strengthening Mexico's ability to govern justly and democratically. The proposed reform of the justice sector (including the expansion of an accusatorial system and the revamping of Mexico's code of criminal procedure) is key for effectively fighting crime.

U.S. support will also train and provide technical support to reform and professionalize federal, state and local police personnel. These efforts should help address the escalating drug-related violence across the country, especially in the border region.

Program Justification

The Calderón Administration has amply demonstrated the strongest commitment to attack the criminal organizations and their illicit trafficking in arms, drugs, precursors and persons. It is also undertaking a fundamental restructuring of the Mexican justice system and its law enforcement agencies (LEAs) and to improve the access by its citizenry to rule of law. Its LEAs have provided an unprecedented level of cooperation. Mexico itself is gravely concerned about the production, trade and consumption of methamphetamines within its territory and USG support will help enable Mexico to attack its production and trafficking, as well as to educate the public of the inherent threat. Gang activities are also increasingly encroaching on Mexico’s borders and pose a security threat to the United States. INL assistance will help the GOM disrupt this activity and prevent the movement of gang criminal activity through Mexico into the United States.

Mexico has made significant advances in meeting its long-term law enforcement goals. During the Fox Administration, the PGR invested significant resources in its units dedicated to investigation (AFI - Federal Investigative Agency), intelligence (CENAPI - Counternarcotics and Anti-Crime Intelligence Center) and prosecution (SIEDO - Deputy Attorney General’s Office on Organized Crime). The Calderón Administration seeks to modify the Constitution and Code of Criminal Procedure to provide for oral trails under an accusatorial system, as well as to restructure the entire federal police force to make it more efficient and responsive to the needs of preserving public security. INL support is needed to help Mexico accomplish these truly historic goals.

Program Accomplishments

In the first weeks of his administration, President Calderon launched aggressive operations across Mexico to reassert control over areas that had fallen under the virtual dominion of drug cartels. Mexican authorities extradited a record 83 fugitives to the United States, including the leader of the Gulf Cartel. Among the many important successes registered by law enforcement authorities was the seizure of over $200 million in cash from a methamphetamine precursor operator, and the seizure of over 48 metric tons (MT) of cocaine (more than twice the amount seized during 2006).

INL's prior support has helped Mexico harden its northern border (and protect the U.S. south-west border) against trafficking in narcotics, bulk cash, arms and other contraband through improvements in its physical inspection infrastructure using non-intrusive inspection equipment (NIIE). SENTRI (Secure Electronic Network for Travelers’ Rapid Inspection) traffic lanes at six major border crossings were also constructed to expedite the crossing of pre-cleared, low-risk commuters, allowing authorities to concentrate more inspection resources on high-risk travelers.

Every year Mexico expends significant resources on its own interdiction and eradication efforts. Annually the GOM destroys thousands of hectares of illicit poppy and marijuana cultivation, seizes tons of illicit drugs (heroin, cocaine, methamphetamines, synthetics and marijuana), intercepts millions of dollars of criminal proceeds, arrests and prosecutes thousands of criminals and extradites record numbers of criminals. The quality of these extraditions rose significantly in January 2007, when the Calderón Administration delivered narco-kingpin Osiel Cardenas into U.S. custody.

FY 2009 Program

The FY 2009 program activity seeks to balance short-term operational objectives (which can yield immediate results in the form of improved seizures of illicit drugs) with long-term institutional development (which will strengthen the GOM’s institutional capacity to fight DTOs and provide for a political-economic system based on rule of law).

The proposed FY 2009 package under the Merida Initiative is for $450M for Mexico (and $100M for Central America), and is organized under the same categories as the FY 2008 Supplemental request: Counternarcotics, Counter-terrorism, and Border Security; Public Security and Law Enforcement; Institution Building and the Rule of Law. The overall objectives of the assistance also remain the same: break the power and impunity of criminal organizations; strengthen border, air, and maritime controls from the Southwest border of the United States to Panama; improve the capacity of justice systems in the region to conduct investigations and prosecutions; consolidate the rule of law, protect human rights, and reform prison management; curtail criminal gang activity; and reduce the demand for drugs throughout the region.

The Merida Initiative is a new paradigm for regional security cooperation among the United States, Mexico, and the countries of Central America. We have far-reaching geographic, economic, and demographic links to Mexico and Central America and a compelling national security interest in helping the governments in this region succeed in the battle against crime and insecurity. The U.S. has a shared responsibility for combating crime and violence that so gravely affect citizens throughout the region. Roughly 90 percent of all the cocaine consumed in the United States transits Mexico. Central American officials have identified gangs, drug trafficking, and trafficking of arms as the most pressing security concerns in that region. The Merida Initiative will respond to those security threats and build on existing strategies and programs. A multi-year proposal, it is designed to build on activities already underway in the region and to complement U.S. efforts here at home to reduce drug demand, to stop the flow of arms and weapons, and to confront gangs and criminal organizations.

This is an important moment in the fight against transnational drug-trafficking and organized crime. The U.S. has an unprecedented opportunity to confront these criminal elements, and to develop a comprehensive and integrated regional effort to disrupt and dismantle organized criminal networks, and to help fortify state institutions to ensure these groups can no longer operate effectively. In Mexico, the Calderón Administration has amply demonstrated strong commitment to attack the cartels and their illicit trafficking in arms, drugs, precursors and persons. It is also undertaking a fundamental restructuring of the Mexican justice system and its law enforcement institutions which will improve the access by its citizenry to rule of law. Its law enforcement agencies have provided an unprecedented level of cooperation. These initiatives will not quash the threat of narcotics trafficking overnight, and for many years to come Mexico will continue to require extensive U.S. support to confront the mutual thereat we both face from the cartels.

Peace and Security

Government Capabilities

INL will support the development of the GOM's institutional capacity to detect and interdict inter alia illicit drugs, explosives and weapons, trafficked/smuggled persons and individuals seeking to enter the United States to conduct terrorist activities. The support will focus principally on two sets of activities: the provision of informatics to raise the technological underpinnings of the GOM’s law enforcement establishment; and, the provision of training and equipment (for example, additional non-intrusive inspection equipment that will reinforce the impact of previous USG investments, and which is outside the scope of Merida Initiative purchases and addresses the changing profile of the threat) to support the further enhancement and security of Mexico’s law enforcement personnel, who daily risk their lives to protect their country.

Through the Merida Initiative, INL will build on these programs, such as providing support to the National Migration Institute (INAMI) to expand and modernize its immigration databases and document verification systems, to digitalize its immigration forms, and to equip and train its border rescue/safety personnel. Additional support will be provided to improve inspection and security systems for key mail facilities to the Secretariat of Communications and Transportation (SCT), and enhanced data management and analysis capabilities to the Mexican intelligence service (CISEN). The Initiative will also provide funding to CISEN for anti-terrorism training and specialized equipment for handling and defusing explosive devices.

The Initiative will also build on existing programs in support of the Attorney General Office’s Operation Against Smugglers (and Traffickers) Initiative on Safety and Security (OASISS) project that prioritizes prosecutorial resources against violent human smugglers operating along the U.S./Mexico border.

Eradication

INL will provide a limited amount of support, contracting for studies and analysis of imagery data, to enhance the GOM's ability to deploy its eradication assets most effectively and to estimate potential yields more accurately.

Interdiction

INL will assist the GOM's effort to disrupt international crime and narcotics trafficking, by improving its overall law enforcement infrastructure. For example, the provision of information technology (IT) equipment that complement GOM-developed software will enable it to establish the new Unified Crime Information System (SUIC). INL will also provide special investigative equipment, such as communications and field drug testing equipment, up to 12 armored vehicles to be used by vetted units liaising with USG law enforcement agencies, and computers to support the new special investigative units within the Federal Police. It will also work with DHS/CBP to assess security and recommend enhancements in Mexico's largest maritime ports. INL will procure additional protective, detection and testing equipment to assist the GOM in combating the production and trafficking of methamphetamines. INL will provide equipment and specially trained canines for responding to drug-related crimes involving drugs, bulk cash, firearms and explosives.

The Merida Initiative calls for funding to the Mexican Navy (SEMAR) for two surveillance planes (CASA CN-235-300) with a full logistics/spare parts/training package, and outfitted with a sensor array similar to that used by the U.S. Coast Guard. In addition, mobile non-intrusive inspection equipment will be provided to the Mexican military and Customs services for use at interior checkpoints, and training will be provided to canine handler teams. Similar support will be provided to the newly restructured federal police force (SSP), including three UH-60 medium-lift utility helicopters to create a rapid-response counternarcotics capability; three Cessna Caravan light surveillance and utility aircraft; and non-intrusive inspective equipment and training for additional canine handler teams.

Demand Control and Reduction

INL will support such demand reduction activities as the GOM’s collection and development of better epidemiological data relating to drug abuse in Mexico and NGO involvement in prevention, treatment and rehabilitation, particularly along the northern border. Acquisition activities will consist mainly of grants to NGOs, as well as computer hardware and software equipment.

Funds will be provided for an informatics infrastructure that will allow the Secretariat of Health to expand its demand reduction activities nationwide by creating a computer network of state governments, NGOs and other non-state actors in issues related to demand reduction and rehabilitation, including long-distance training.

Financial Crimes and Money Laundering

INL will help the GOM to disrupt money laundering inter alia by facilitating the bilateral sharing of strategic and tactical information relating to ongoing investigations. Support will include consultancies, specialized equipment such as money counting and x-ray machinery, hardware/software packages and specialized training. The expected outcomes are an enhanced GOM capability to initiate investigations autonomously and to cooperate with those of USG agencies, as well as an increase in asset seizures and forfeitures.

Governing Justly and Democratically

Justice Systems

Law Enforcement Training: INL will provide training inter alia to the PGR, to the newly restructured federal police force within the Secretariat of Public Security (SSP) and to the Secretariat of Public Function (Mexico's version of the General Accounting Office), as well as to various offices of State Attorneys General. These activities will often mix personnel from a variety of entities, providing the side benefit of fostering increased interaction and teamwork among personnel at the federal and state levels. Specialized training will include such courses as: Ethics in Government; Supervision and Management; Criminal Investigative Techniques; Crime Scene Search and Preservation of Evidence; Anti-Corruption; and, Train-the-Trainer (which includes curriculum development for instructors).

Training will be provided to the courts and PGR in prison management and evidence preservation as conceived in the Merida Initiative.

Police and Justice System Restructuring: The Calderón Administration has launched a package of changes that will significantly improve Mexico's justice system and its law enforcement capabilities. INL will support these initiatives by:

  • providing IT equipment and software that expands an existing case-tracking system used by PGR officials with access a national database for use in administrative, investigative and operational matters;

  • providing IT equipment and software, systems design and programming support for the Center for Analysis, Planning, and Intelligence Against Organized Crimes (CENAPI); and

  • providing IT equipment and software, as well as other forms of technical support, to modernize and sustain the capabilities of the PGR Forensic Laboratory.

The Merida Initiative foresees funding to assist the PGR in completing its computerized case tracking system, providing maintenance services for the many IT systems contemplated under the Initiative, and providing additional sophisticated equipment to the PGR Forensic Laboratory.

Anti-Corruption Reform

Culture of Lawfulness: The Culture of Lawfulness Project partners with governmental and nongovernmental leaders to develop, evaluate and institutionalize sustainable rule of law education programs. INL support provides for consultancies and the production of educational and promotional materials for distribution through four channels: schools, state police, mass media and community and faith-based groups.

Support for GOM Anti-Corruption Initiatives: INL support will help the Calderón Administration identify and root out corruption in the federal bureaucracy, but with a special focus on law enforcement agencies. INL support will include, inter alia, computer and polygraph equipment, training and technical support in such areas as ethics, anti-corruption and internal affairs for the PGR, SSP and SFP. Training will often be provided by U.S. LEA personnel.

The Merida Initiative calls for augmenting these existing programs, with programs promoting anticorruption, transparency, judicial reform and human rights, including funding for civil society human rights NGOs which support justice reforms, support for bar associations and law schools involved in reform efforts, and human rights training for police, prosecutors and corrections officers.

Program Development and Support

PD&S funds will be used for the salaries, benefits, allowances and travel of direct hire and contract U.S. and foreign national personnel, for residential leasing, for ICASS funding and for other administrative and operating expenses related to program planning, design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation.

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Mexico

INL BUDGET

($000)

FY 2007
FY 2008
FY 2008 Supp
FY 2009 Base
FY 2009 Merida
Peace and Security

Governments' Capabilities

Non-Intrusive Inspectional Equipment
6,653
3,000
-
-
-

Data sharing
1,000
500
-
-
-

Sub-Total
7,653
3,500
-
-
-
Counternarcotics

Eradication
200
-
-
50
-

Interdiction
12,916
16,108
365,105
17,221
381,356

Drug Demand Reduction
790
400
15,157
1,000
10,950

Sub-total
13,906
16,508
380,262
18,271
392,306
Transnational Crime

Financial Crimes and Money Laundering
625
500
5,000
500
-

Trafficking in Persons
-
-
2,000
500
4,500

Sub-total
625
500
7,000
1,000
4,500
Governing Justly and Democratically

Rule of Law

Justice Systems

Professionalization and Training
5,000
3,000
62,738
5,545
23,379

Police & Justice System Restructuring
7,112
645
-
-
-

Human Rights
-
-
5,529
-
-

Sub-total
12,112
3,645
68,267
5,545
23,379
Good Governance

Local Government and Decentralization
-
-
6,971
-
-

Anti-Corruption Reform
782
400
500
1,000
7,315

Total Sub-Operational Support
35,078
24,553
463,000
25,816
427,500

Program Development and Support

U.S. Personnel
450
750

Non-U.S. Personnel
220
800

ICASS
430
50

Program Support
500
400

Sub-Total
1,600
2,000
37,000
2,000
22,500

Total

36,678
26,553
500,000
27,816
450,000


Nicaragua

Budget Summary ($000)

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FY 2007 Actual

FY 2008 Estimate

FY 2009 Request

200 *

972

1,600

* FY 2007 funding for Nicaragua is accounted for in the Caribbean and Central America Regional account.

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Enhance the abilities of the Government of Nicaragua’s (GON) law enforcement agencies to detect and intercept shipments, detain traffickers, and stop the laundering of illegal profits from the drug industry.

Increased number of interdictions and quantity of drugs and contraband seized.

Increases in the number of arrests and successful prosecutions of drug traffickers and money launderers.

Declining rates of drug abuse.

The program will also support preventative programs to protect youth from drugs and recruitment into gangs.

Continued low rates of youth membership in transnational gangs.

The Trafficking in Persons funding will support services for trafficked persons.

Trafficking victims rescued in Nicaragua will receive shelter, food, psychological support and repatriation assistance.

Transformational Diplomacy

Nicaragua is a “transforming country,” a low income country that meets the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) policy and democracy guidelines. It faces threats of drug trafficking, money laundering and organized crime under the Peace and Security element, and weak and corrupt justice systems under the Governing Justly element

Program Justification

Nicaragua is the second poorest country in the Americas, with a daunting set of political, economic and social problems that hinder the country’s growth. Nicaragua’s geographic location makes it is a significant sea and land transshipment point for cocaine and heroin and it has an ineffectual, corrupt, and politicized judicial system. The GON is making a determined effort to fight both domestic drug abuse and the international narcotics trade, and to prevent establishment of the criminal youth gangs. USG foreign assistance to Nicaragua is needed to improving the GON’s capacity to respond to trans-national threats, particularly drug trafficking.

Program Accomplishments

In March 2007, the GON created a Vetted Unit within the Nicaraguan National Police (NNP) which conducted investigations of international drug trafficking and money laundering organizations operating in Nicaragua. During 2007, Nicaragua authorities were successful in their enforcement operations, seizing over 13 metric tons of cocaine, 153 kilograms of heroin, and arresting 192 individuals for international drug trafficking, including Nicaraguan, Colombian, Mexican, Guatemalan, and Honduran nationals, and seizing over $6 million in smuggled U.S. currency. This included disrupting trafficking efforts of the Mexican Sinaloa Cartel.

FY 2009 Program

Interdiction

Funds will be used to provide computer equipment for information exchange, and operational support for the GON Anti-Corruption Unit. This vetted police unit is responsible for developing intelligence on money laundering and drug trafficking that can be used for interdiction, arrests, and, asset seizure and forfeiture. FY 2009 interdiction project funds will also be used to provide maintenance, spare parts and facilities upkeep to the Nicaraguan Navy for maritime interdiction efforts and training in maritime vessel maintenance.

This request complements the Merida Initiative requests to enhance border security and interdiction; provide technological tools for information development and exchange (fingerprint analysis, vetted units, drug and INTERPOL networks); maritime interdiction support through repairs to patrol boats and communications and safety equipment; and protective equipment, communications equipment, and vehicles for police, training in asset forfeiture and for court personnel and prosecutors, and anti-arms trafficking training by regional firearms advisor.

Demand Reduction

The principal demand reduction programs supported in Nicaragua are the Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) and Second Step program, both of which are oriented to young people. Funds will provide materials such as books and sporting equipment, and operational support for training seminars and promotional events to these demand reduction efforts in Nicaragua, particularly in the Atlantic coast region.

Financial Crimes and Money Laundering

Funds will be used to support the creation and operation of a Financial Intelligence Unit (FIU) for Nicaragua to complement the work of the vetted anti-corruption police unit. Support will include provision of computers, a database server, office furniture, training, and leasing office space. The FIU will be an independent unit that conforms to Egmont Group standards for FIUs, and consist of personnel with finance, banking, police and prosecutorial backgrounds. Other personnel with expertise may be seconded to the FIU from other government agencies, such as the National Police.

Trafficking in Persons (TIP)

Social stigma prevents many victims from assisting in the investigation and prosecution of their traffickers. Funds will support the increase in services such as shelter and psychological treatment for adult victims of TIP. Additionally, funds will support comprehensive services (trauma, counseling and shelter), vocational training, and economic opportunities for women who have been sexually exploited. The USG will also support training for the NNP Women Women’s Unit, and other specialized police units which focus on cracking down on TIP crimes and assisting TIP victims.

Organized and Gang-related Crime

Funds will support the NNP's successful community policing model in preventing gang formation and violence, particularly through the NNP's Juvenile Affairs division. Supported activities will include gang-member outreach events and reintegration programs for former gang-members. This also complements the requests for support to community gang prevention activities and training in prison management under the Merida Initiative.

Program Development and Support (PD&S)

Funds will be used for salaries, benefits, allowances and travel of foreign national personnel, residential leasing, International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) costs and other administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation.

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Nicaragua
INL BUDGET
($000)

FY 2007
FY 2007
Supp

FY 2008
FY 2009
Interdiction

Border Security
-
-
69
20
Intelligence Fusion and Analysis
-
-
400
200
Marine Interdiction
-
-
-
220
Land Interdiction
-
-
-
210

Sub Total
-
-
469
650
Drug Awareness/Demand Reduction
75
85
Transnational Crime

Financial Crimes and Money Laundering
-
-
-
100
Trafficking in Persons
-
-
228
465
Organized and Gang-related Crime
-
-
-
100

Sub Total
-
-
228
665
Program Development and Support

U.S. Personnel
-
-
-
-
Non-U.S. Personnel
-
-
81
81
ICASS
-
-
90
90
Program Support
-
-
29
29

Sub-Total
-
-
200
200
Total

-
-
972
1,600


Paraguay

Budget Summary ($000)

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FY 2007 Actual

FY 2008 Estimate

FY 2009 Request

579 *

278

300

* FY 2007 funding for Paraguay is accounted for in the Southern Cone Regional account.

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Enable the Government of Paraguay (GOP) to strengthen its technical and operational ability to interdict narcotics, conduct complex criminal investigations, and arrest traffickers.

Increased quantity of cocaine seized by 10 percent; increased presence of National Anti-Drug Secretariat (SENAD) in areas where it previously had little or no presence; expanded SENAD operations.

Assist the GOP in reaching out to students, teachers and parents, to reduce and prevent the consumption of illegal drugs.

GOP updates its national study of the prevalence of risk factors, and tracks the effectiveness of its school-age demand reduction programs.

Transformational Diplomacy

The counternarcotics program in Paraguay advances the Secretary’s Transformational Diplomacy Peace and Security objective by providing training, equipment and operational support designed to enhance the GOP’s ability to investigate narcotics-trafficking organizations and interdict drug shipments, as well as control demand for illicit drugs.

Program Justification

Paraguay is attractive to international narcotics traffickers due to its strategic position between Bolivia, Brazil, and Argentina. Cocaine from Bolivia is shipped overland into Paraguay and into Argentina and Brazil for transshipment to Europe, Africa and the Middle East. Traffickers also take advantage of the lack of law enforcement presence in much of Paraguay’s national territory. A number of individuals and groups involved in financing Mideast terrorism from criminal activities undertaken in the Tri-Border Area (TBA) are also involved in drug trafficking. In 2007, as SENAD expanded its operations in Pedro Juan Caballero and other areas, it arrested several drug traffickers, and made three record-high weapons seizures. Although SENAD enjoys solid support from the highest levels of the GOP and the Paraguayan public, its operational effectiveness is hampered by the limited financial resources of the GOP. USG assistance is necessary for SENAD to continue achieving the kind of results it has repeatedly produced.

Paraguay is surrounded by countries (Brazil, Argentina, and Uruguay) that have serious problems with consumption of illicit drugs. Paraguay has an extremely low rate of cocaine consumption, but a serious demand reduction effort will prevent cocaine consumption from increasing.

Program Accomplishments

In 2007, SENAD seized 820 kilograms (kg) of cocaine, 100 metric tons (MT) of marijuana and 18 vehicles. SENAD also arrested several well-known drug traffickers, including Edmar Dois Rei Almeida, Jesus Hernando Gutierrez and six members of his cartel, and confiscated their assets. SENAD detained 170 persons and extradited two, one each to Argentina and Brazil. In late December, the Paraguayan Congress finally passed an improved version of the penal code which became law in early 2008. The new code makes money laundering an “autonomous” crime (one in which no predicate offense conviction is required), punishable by a prison term of up to ten years. It also improves Paraguay’s legislative framework for intellectual property and trafficking in persons’ violations.

Since the opening of the new SENAD regional office in Pedro Juan Caballero (PJC), Paraguay has expanded its counternarcotics and investigative activities in the region, producing more arrests and seizures. In addition, SENAD opened two new regional offices in Salto la Guaira and Pilar. All these regional offices will enhance SENAD’s presence as they are strategically located near Paraguay’s borders with Brazil and Argentina.

FY 2009 Program

SENAD Equipment and Commodities Assistance

This project enhances SENAD’s ability to conduct counternarcotics enforcement activities, by providing training and technical assistance for SENAD agents. Funds will be used to train SENAD agents in investigative methods, provide computers and software, and purchase equipment such as uniforms, GPS units, and bullet-proof vests.

SENAD Operational Support

This project provides funding to support SENAD investigations of major narcotics traffickers. Funds will be used to provide operational expenses, such as gasoline, helicopter fuel, and vetting of investigators and prosecutors from the Public Ministry.

Narcotics Detection Canine Program

Support will enhance the GOP’s narcotics enforcement activities through the use of narcotics detection canines. Funds will be used to purchase several dogs locally and train them, as well as to upgrade the dog kennels. The canine unit supports SENAD drug inspections and interdiction operations. FY 2009 funds will assist SENAD to expand its operations into new areas in Paraguay.

Demand Reduction Program

The goal of this project is to continue and expand the GOP’s drug abuse awareness program and will build on the achievements of previous years. Funds will be used to assist SENAD with travel and administrative costs in conjunction with its demand reduction outreach program, and to enable the GOP to update its national study of the prevalence of risk factors in order to track the effectiveness of its demand reduction programs.

Program, Development and Support (PD&S)

PD&S funds will be used to pay the salary, allowances, and benefits for one part-time contract employee supporting the INL program. In addition, PD&S will support International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) costs and other general administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation.

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Paraguay
INL BUDGET
($000)

FY 2007
FY 2007
Supp

FY 2008
FY 2009
Interdiction
-
-
272
215
Program Development and Support
-
-
6
85
Total

-
-
278
300


Trinidad and Tobago

Budget Summary ($000)

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FY 2007 Actual

FY 2008 Estimate

FY 2009 Request

---

397

500

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Improve mobility, communications and technical operations for Government of Trinidad and Tobago’s (GOTT) law enforcement agencies.

Increase drug seizures by ten percent.

Transformational Diplomacy

The USG’s counternarcotics efforts in Trinidad and Tobago advance the Secretary’s Transformational Diplomacy Peace and Security objective by strengthening the ability of GOTT law enforcement to detect and interdict drug shipments, and to detect and prosecute money laundering crimes. In addition, funding for demand reduction efforts will support the GOTT’s efforts to curb drug-related gang violence and criminal behavior.

Program Justification

As a result of Venezuela’s lack of cooperation with the U.S., there has been an increase in the transshipment of cocaine and heroin to Trinidad and Tobago, via Venezuela. The majority of the cocaine that arrives on Trinidad is via commercial vessels, sailing vessels and small fishing vessels, in amounts upwards of several thousand kilogram quantities. These loads are generally coordinated by organized Colombian and Venezuelan drug trafficking organizations, and are often facilitated and protected by members of the Venezuelan military. The cocaine is then stored and broken up into smaller loads for smuggling into the U.S., Canada and Europe. The GOTT has faced an escalation in violent crime in which the Colombian drugs-for-arms trade has provided many of the weapons fueling the violent crime.

Program Accomplishments

The GOTT, during joint operations with foreign law enforcement counterparts, made 110 drug trafficking arrests in 2007, an increase of 92 persons compared to last year. Also in 2007, the GOTT seized approximately 167 kilograms (kg) of cocaine and 3,792 kg of cannabis in various forms. The GOTT also conducted 148 eradications, destroying 162,210 marijuana plants, 15,500 seedlings and 194 kilograms of cured marijuana.

The Organized Crime Narcotics and Firearms Bureau (OCNFB) reported an increase in seizures of various types of illicit drugs and disruption of the drug trade in 2007. The OCNFB arrested 85 persons, seized over 100 kilos of cocaine and over 2,193 kilos of marijuana from January to October 2007. The GOTT Incident Coordination Center established in 2006, and staffed by personnel from a number of specialized agencies, facilitated information sharing and more effective response by law enforcement to counter-drug and financial investigations in 2007. The GOTT also completed six drug related extraditions in 2007, an increase from two in 2006.

FY 2009 Program

The key U.S. policy objective is to assist the GOTT to eliminate the flow of illegal drugs through Trinidad and Tobago to the United States. Joint efforts focus on strengthening the GOTT’s ability to detect and interdict drug shipments, bring traffickers and other criminals to trial, attack money laundering, and counter drug-related corruption. Funds will support the enhancement of the Special Anti-Narcotics Unit, by providing the necessary training and technical support to ensure the increased seizures of drugs. Funding to support operations of the Organized Crime Narcotics and Firearms Bureau (OCNFB) will help increase seizures of various types of illicit drugs and disruption of the drug trade.

Interdiction

FY 2009 funds will support training and technical assistance to GOTT’s counter-drug/crime units, including the Police, Defense Force, and SAUTT to improve their capability to conduct interdiction operations on land and at sea. Training includes crime scene investigation, evidence handling, terrorism detection, narcotics interdiction, narcotics detection, infrastructure protection, suspect tracking and other topics.

Money Laundering

The GOTT lacks the expertise to create and implement effective anti-money laundering policies. FY 2009 funds will support technical expertise and training provided by the Caribbean Financial Action Task Force’s (CFATF) to assist the Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago (CBTT). This will help the GOTT to fully implement all of the CFATF recommendations to combat terrorist financing as well as support the GOTT’s efforts to adopt and implement financing regulations preventing a rapidly growing economy from becoming a safe haven for money launderers.

Demand Reduction

FY 2009 funds will support drug demand reduction and crime prevention programs that complement other counternarcotics efforts. This includes provision of training to organizations that give youth alternatives to criminal activities and support for GOTT re-integration and rehabilitation efforts.

Program Development and Support

PD&S funds cover the cost of salaries, benefits, and allowances of foreign national direct hire personnel, field travel, International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) costs, and other general administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation.

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Trinidad and Tobago
INL BUDGET
($000)

FY 2007
FY 2007
Supp

FY 2008
FY 2009
Narcotics Law Enforcement
-
-
150
-
Border Control and Port Security
-
-
50
-
Interdiction
-
-
27
210
Money Laundering
-
-
-
100
Drug Awareness/Demand Reduction
-
-
50
60
Program Development and Support

U.S. Personnel
-
-
-
-

Non-U.S. Personnel
-
-
69
74

ICASS Costs
-
-
51
56

Program Support
-
-
-
-

Sub-Total
-
-
120
130
Total

-
-
397
500



Western Hemisphere Regional (Central America Merida)

Budget Summary ($000)

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FY 2007 Actual

FY 2008 Supplemental Request

FY 2009 Request

---

50,000

100,000

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Counternarcotics, Counterterrorism, and Border Security

Strengthen the region’s ability to interdict air, land and sea drug shipments; and control its borders, ports of entry, and choke points within its national transportation system through the detection and interdiction of illicit narcotics, contraband (including explosives and weapons), trafficked/smuggled persons and individuals seeking to enter the United States to conduct terrorist activities.

Increases in the volume of seized drugs; the amount of bulk cash seizures; and in the number of trafficking-related arrests.

More effective and rapid screening of cargo and vehicles for illicit drugs and contraband.

Public Security and Law Enforcement

Enhance Central American capabilities to target the disruption of the command and control of drug trafficking organizations. Expand the capacity of law enforcement agencies to interdict trafficked narcotics and the illicit proceeds that derive from them.

Increased frequency, accuracy and speed of information-sharing between law enforcement agencies will lead to more effective investigations and prosecutions.

Strengthened of intelligence efforts against criminal organizations.

Institution Building and Rule of Law

Promote the professionalization and modernization of Central American law enforcement institutions and criminal justice sectors.

Improved efficiency and effectiveness of criminal justice systems in the region to conduct credible investigations and successfully prosecute criminal organizations.

Promote the rule of law and protection of human rights through specialized investigative, technical, and management training.

Expand demand reduction programs to educate the public about the harmful personal and societal effects of drug abuse and the growing threat of gang activity.

Transformational Diplomacy

The countries of the region are at different levels in the Transformational Democracy Framework. Panama, Belize and Costa Rica are sustaining partners in transformational democracy. El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua are Transforming (low to middle income, meeting the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) performance criteria) and Guatemala is developing (low to middle income, not meeting MCC criteria). The majority of the programs support Peace and Security, especially counternarcotics and organized and transnational crime. There is also significant support to the Governing Justly and Democratically objective. This includes strengthening the justice system and anti-corruption measures.

Program Justification

The Merida Initiative will establish a new paradigm for regional security cooperation among the United States, Mexico, and the countries of Central America. We have far-reaching geographic, economic, and demographic links to Mexico and Central America and a compelling national security interest in helping the governments in this region succeed in the battle against crime and insecurity. The U.S. has a shared responsibility for combating crime and violence that so gravely affect citizens throughout the region. Central American officials have identified gangs, drug trafficking, and trafficking of arms as the most pressing security concerns in that region. A multi-year proposal, the Merida Initiative will respond to those security threats and build on activities already underway in the region and to complement U.S. efforts here at home to reduce drug demand, stop the flow of arms and weapons, and confront gangs and criminal organizations.

The Merida Initiative represents an unprecedented opportunity to confront these criminal elements, and to develop a comprehensive and integrated regional effort to disrupt and dismantle organized criminal networks, and to help fortify state institutions to ensure these groups can no longer operate effectively. The Central American countries have taken important steps through the Central American Integration System (SICA) to clearly express the political resolve to join forces to strengthen regional security; however they lack the necessary tools and capacity to execute such a will. Despite these challenges, national authorities remain committed to the fight; using their own limited resources and outdated equipment to interdict narcotics, arrest narcotics trafficking members, and putting their own police officers’ lives on the line.

FY 2009 Program

The FY 2009 request of $100 million builds on the FY 2008 Supplemental request of $50 million and is organized under the same categories: Counternarcotics, Counterterrorism, and Border Security; Public Security and Law Enforcement; Institution Building and the Rule of Law. The overall objectives of the assistance also remain the same: break the power and impunity of criminal organizations; strengthen border, air, and maritime controls from the Southwest border of the United States to Panama; improve the capacity of justice systems in the region to conduct investigations and prosecutions; consolidate the rule of law, protect human rights, reform prison management; curtail criminal gang activity; and reduce the demand for drugs throughout the region.

Counternarcotics, Counterterrorism, and Border Security

Assistance will promote information sharing and collection, including enhancement of crime and fingerprint databases, provision of communication equipment, and expansion of sensitive investigation police units focused on counternarcotics. Funds will also be used for port, airport and border security, including low-tech inspection equipment and training through the OAS Inter-American Committee Against Terrorism. Assistance will also combat trafficking in drugs and arms, including by upgrading maritime interdiction assets in Central America and technical assistance on firearms tracing, interdiction, and destruction.

Public Security and Law Enforcement

Funds will be use to implement the anti-gang strategy, including diplomacy, the electronic travel document system, capacity enhancement for anti-gang units, and community-based prevention programs. Assistance will also provide specialized police training and equipment, including, vehicles, and communication equipment.

Institution Building and Rule of Law

Funds will improve courts management and prosecutorial capacity, providing prison management expertise, and to support community policing programs.

Program Development and Support

Funds will be used for salaries, allowances, and benefits of U.S. and foreign national direct hire employees and contract personnel working in Narcotics Affairs Sections or Offices in the region. In addition, funds pay for International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) costs and other general administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation.

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Central America - Merida
INL BUDGET
($000)



FY 2007
FY 2008
FY 2008
Supp

FY 2009
Counternarcotics, Counterterrorism and Border Security

Information sharing and collection, fingerprint databases
-
-
7,500
10,000

Port, airport, and border security, support for OAS CT program
-
-
3,843
4,234

Trafficking in drugs and arms
-
-
5,270
25,750

Sub-total
-
-
16,613
39,984
Public Security and Law Enforcement

Implementation of anti-gang strategy
-
-
12,552
13,016

Provide specialized police training and equipment
-
-
13,122
19,000

Sub-total
-
-
25,674
32,016
Institution Building and Rule of Law

Improve courts and prison management, community policing
-
-
7,713
23,000

Sub-total
-
-
7,713
23,000
Program Development and Support

Sub-Total
-
-
-
5,000
TOTAL



-
-
50,000
100,000

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