Bureau of Resource Management
Report
January 15, 2009

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Photo showing Secretary Rice and Polish Foreign Minister Sikorski celebrating the U.S. - Poland missile defense agreement in Warsaw, Poland.

Secretary Rice and Polish Foreign Minister Sikorski celebrating the U.S.–Poland missile defense agreement in Warsaw, Poland.
AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski

Preserve international peace by preventing regional conflicts and transnational crime, combating terrorism and weapons of mass destruction, and supporting homeland security and security cooperation.

I. Public Benefit

The United States promotes peace, liberty and prosperity for all people, and ensuring security is central to achieving peace. The U.S. Government directly confronts threats to national and international security from terrorism, weapons proliferation, failed or failing states, and political violence. By enforcing compliance with arms control, nonproliferation and disarmament agreements through diplomacy, political and economic sanctions, and physical interdiction, we ensure our national security and the security of the global community. In doing so, we strengthen U.S. national security as well as the capability of the U.S. Government and of international partners to prevent or mitigate conflict, stabilize countries in crisis, promote regional stability, protect civilians, and promote the just application of government and law. Our security is best guaranteed when our friends and neighbors are secure, free, prosperous, and at peace.

II. Summary of Performance

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FY 2008 Results Achieved for Strategic Goal 1
RatingNumber of IndicatorsPercentage of Indicators
Above target 5 19%
On target10 39%
Improved over prior year, but target not met 7 27%
Below target 4 15%
Data not yet available 0 0%
Total26100%

Key Selected Achievements

  • NATO expanded its Training Mission in Iraq to include Air Force/Navy staff officers, border security, and advanced forensics training and handed over significant aspects of its officer and non-commissioned officer academy training to the Iraqi government.
  • The Department further developed the U.S.- Poland bilateral security relationship with a ballistic missile defense agreement.

III. Performance Analysis and Resources Invested

A total of seven strategic priorities are included under Strategic Goal 1. The following are a few illustrative performance indicators. The complete set of 26 indicators can be found in the Department’s Annual Performance Report at http://www.state.gov/s/d/rm/rls/perfrpt/2008apr/ on page 32.

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FY 2008 Budget Authority for Strategic Goal 1
(Dollars in Millions)
Strategic PrioritiesBudget
Counterterrorism$ 440
Combating Weapons of Mass Destruction and Destabilizing Conventional Weapons$ 505
Security Cooperation and Security Sector Reform$ 5,586
Conflict Prevention, Mitigation, and Response$ 3,295
Transnational Crime$ 141
Counternarcotics$ 1,073
Homeland Security$ 172
Total$11,213

1. COUNTERTERRORISM: Prevent terrorist attacks against the United States, our allies, and our friends, and strengthen alliances and other international arrangements to defeat global terrorism.

U.S. Government activities seek to help other countries establish the capacity of their legal and regulatory systems and their security forces to combat and defeat terrorists. In the multi-lateral arena the U.S. Government works with other governments and international organizations to develop coalitions and international laws and agreements to combat terrorism.

Analysis: The U.S. Government trains law enforcement agencies in partner countries and provides state-of-the art computer database systems that enable identification of suspected terrorists attempting to transit air, land or sea ports of entry.

The indicator below summarizes the performance of U.S. counterterrorism training activities. Training allies to battle terrorism is a smart and efficient way to extend a protective net beyond U.S. borders and ensure that terrorism is thwarted before it reaches the U.S., while at the same time strengthening U.S. Government partnerships. In addition, training programs deliver technical finance assistance and training to improve the ability to investigate, identify and interdict the flow of money to terrorist groups, and support activities that deradicalize youth and prisoners. A strong example of this is the Anti-Terrorism Assistance (ATA) program in the Philippines. In FY 2008, U.S. efforts enhanced the capacity of Philippine law enforcement agencies to deter, detect, counter, and investigate terrorist activities by providing valuable training in a wide range of areas including Interdicting Terrorist Activity, Explosive Incident Countermeasures, Post-Blast Investigation, Advanced Computer and Cellphone Forensics.

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Performance Indicator Target and Results Summary for 2006-2009
Performance Indicator2006
Results
2007
Results
2008
Target
2008
Results
2008
Rating
2009
Target
Number of Host Country Officials Trained in Counterterrorism By U.S. Government ProgramsIndicator established in 20071,9252,6002,651Blue: above target.
Above target
3,936
Impact(s): Increased capacity, skills, and abilities in host countries and strengthened partnership with the U.S. Government in the war on terror.
Reasons for Exceeding Target: The performance target was set at an approximate level and the deviation from that level is slight. There was no effect on overall program or activity performance.
Data Source, Verification, and Validation: 2008 Performance Reports from 15 countries as collected in the Foreign Assistance and Coordination System (FACTS). Performance data are validated and verified using Data Quality Assessments and must meet five data quality standards of validity, integrity, precision, reliability, and timeliness. Data quality assessments revealed no significant data limitations.

2. COMBATING WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION (WMD) AND DESTABILIZING CONVENTIONAL WEAPONS: Prevent the proliferation of and trafficking in weapons of mass destruction and destabilizing conventional weapons, thereby reducing their threat to the United States, our allies, and our friends.

Activities in this area aim to prevent the proliferation of, and trafficking in, WMDs and involve many policy initiatives, such as denuclearization of North Korea and the Proliferation Security Initiative, as well as several foreign assistance programs, including the Global Threat Reduction Program and the Export Control and Related Border Security program (EXBS).

Analysis: One of the most important policy initiatives in this area has been restraining Iran’s nuclear program. In FY 2008, the EXBS program continued to provide assistance to over 45 partner countries to improve their strategic trade control and related border security capabilities in the effort to stem the flow of weapons of mass destruction (WMD), their delivery systems, and advanced conventional weapons. With FY 2008 funds, we expanded EXBS programs to Cambodia, Kosovo, and Libya, and plan further expansion in FY 2009. The following indicator highlights a worldwide cumulative measure of U.S. progress in instituting strategic trade and border controls.

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Performance Indicator Target and Results Summary for 2006-2009
Performance Indicator2006
Results
2007
Results
2008
Target
2008
Results
2008
Rating
2009
Target
Cumulative Number of Countries That Developed Valid Border Security Programs Meeting International Standards8121212Green: On target.
On target
14
Impact(s): Strong strategic trade and border control systems are the front line of our efforts to prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.
Data Source, Verification, and Validation: 12 countries whose systems meet the international export standards as validated by EXBS reporting. Data is compiled and tracked by the Department of State’s Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation, based on feedback from their program managers and Contracting Officer’s Representatives and is maintained on their intranet. Performance data are validated and verified using Data Quality Assessments and must meet five data quality standards of validity, integrity, precision, reliability, and timeliness. Data quality assessments revealed no significant data limitations.

3. SECURITY COOPERATION AND SECURITY SECTOR REFORM: Establish, maintain, and where appropriate, expand close, strong, and effective U.S. security ties with allies, friends, and regional organizations.

Responsible governments must deal with threats within their own borders and address international problems in partnership with the U.S. and others. Diplomatic and development activities in this area promote U.S. interests around the world by ensuring that coalition partners and friendly governments are equipped and trained to work toward common security goals.

Analysis: The indicator below attempts to measure the degree to which U.S.-supplied training of Foreign Military Personnel is seen as valuable by foreign governments. The underlying assumption is that by promoting U.S. trained personnel to national leadership positions the skills and values provided in that training will eventually be spread to the entire military structure and that leadership will be more likely to respect civilian control of the military, be willing to work with U.S. led or sponsored peacekeeping missions and be interested in maintaining a longstanding relationship with the United States.

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Performance Indicator Target and Results Summary for 2006-2009
Performance Indicator2006
Results
2007
Results
2008
Target
2008
Results
2008
Rating
2009
Target
Number of Foreign Military Personnel at National Leadership Levels Trained in the United StatesIndicator established in 20079581,297497Red: below target.
Below target
547
Impact(s): Increased capacity and skills in host countries strengthened their ability to enforce peace and security. The promotion of military-to-military cooperation, development of military professionalism, increased interoperability and enhanced ability to achieve mutual objectives.
Steps to Improve: Because of a military led coup in Mauritania, U.S. training programs were suspended and the country was unable to meet its target of 500. Several other U.S. Missions were unable to meet their targets because the host government personnel were not available. The impact of the Mauritanian program’s failure to meet the target revealed issues in the understanding of the indicator by several locations which will be addressed in the next reporting cycle.
Data Source, Verification, and Validation: 2008 Performance Reports from 24 countries as collected in the Foreign Assistance and Coordination System (FACTS). Additional countries have set targets against this indicator in 2009. Performance data are validated and verified using Data Quality Assessments and must meet five data quality standards of validity, integrity, precision, reliability, and timeliness. Data quality assessments revealed that several locations misunderstood the use of this indicator which issue is being addressed in guidance for the next reporting cycle.

4. CONFLICT PREVENTION, MITIGATION, AND RESPONSE: Support the prevention, containment or mitigation, and resolution of existing or emergent regional conflicts, as well as post-conflict peace, reconciliation, and justice processes.

U.S. Government diplomatic and development activities support conflict mitigation, peace, reconciliation, and justice processes. Programs are designed to meet specific needs of a country’s transition, establishing a foundation for longer-term development by promoting reconciliation, fostering peace and democracy, and jumpstarting nascent government operations.

Analysis: The indicator below highlights U.S. Government training assistance that improves the capacities of key stakeholders to negotiate, thereby empowering those individuals to better manage conflict both within their group and between groups, as well as training them to be effective in implementing and managing peace processes.

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Performance Indicator Target and Results Summary for 2006-2009
Performance Indicator2006
Results
2007
Results
2008
Target
2008
Results
2008
Rating
2009
Target
Number of People Trained in Conflict Mitigation/Resolution Skills with U.S. AssistanceIndicator established in 200717,9655,44912,578Blue: above target.
Above target
24,634
Impact(s): Increases a population’s abilities to reduce the threat or impact of violent conflict, promote peaceful resolution of differences, mitigate violence, and establish frameworks for peace and reconciliation. Performance data for this indicator fluctuate widely from year to year, depending on country need and capacity.
Reasons for Exceeding Target: The performance target was set at an approximate target level. Results exceeded expectations due to more favorable conditions in the reporting countries. There was no effect on overall program or activity performance.
Data Source, Verification, and Validation: 2008 Performance Reports from seven countries and USAID’s Bureau of Democracy, Conflict, and Humanitarian Assistance as collected in the Foreign Assistance and Coordination System (FACTS). Performance data are validated and verified using Data Quality Assessments and must meet five data quality standards of validity, integrity, precision, reliability, and timeliness. Data quality assessments revealed no significant data limitations.

5. COUNTERNARCOTICS: Disrupt and reduce international drug trafficking by cooperating internationally to set and implement anti-drug standards, share related financial and political burdens, close off criminal safe havens, and build and strengthen justice systems.

Programs in this area help reduce the flow of drugs to the United States, address instability in the Andean region, and strengthen the ability of both source and transit countries to investigate, block, and prosecute major drug trafficking organizations and their leaders.

Analysis: The indicator below summarizes one measurement of law enforcement effectiveness and the efficacy of assistance in providing host governments with operational support, equipment, and training in the eradication of illicit drug crops.

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Performance Indicator Target and Results Summary for 2006-2009
Performance Indicator2006
Results
2007
Results
2008
Target
2008
Results
2008
Rating
2009
Target
Hectares of Drug Crops Eradicated Annually in U.S. Government-Assisted AreasIndicator established in 2007177,452182,975253,117Blue: above target.
Above target
215,550
Impact(s): Every successful eradication operation keeps drugs out of the United States. U.S. Government crop eradication assistance includes technical, financial, and logistical support for eradication missions, alternative livelihood development, road construction, and small water and electricity plans.
Reasons for Exceeding Target: Two locations in particular, Peru and Columbia, exceeded their FY 2008 targets. In Columbia, the eradication program has become more efficient and the number of hectares sprayed with glyphosate has increased by over 30%, using essentially the same resources since FY 2002. One location, however, Bolivia, saw a 21% decrease in eradication for FY 2008 due to the apparent current lack of political will of eradicating only but the minimum necessary.
Data Source, Verification, and Validation: 2008 Performance Reports from 6 countries as collected in the Foreign Assistance and Coordination System (FACTS). Performance data are validated and verified using Data Quality Assessments and must meet five data quality standards of validity, integrity, precision, reliability, and timeliness. Data quality assessments revealed no significant data limitations.

For a complete discussion of the following strategic priorities including performance measures, please refer to the APR.

6. TRANSNATIONAL CRIME: Decrease and minimize cross-border crimes that threaten the United States and other countries by strengthening abilities to detect, investigate, prosecute, and ultimately prevent violations of law.

7. HOMELAND SECURITY: Create conditions abroad that serve and protect American citizens and interests by assisting consular and infrastructure protection programs.

IN FOCUS: REBUILDING EFFORTS IN IRAQ

The past year has been marked with change and transition in Iraq. The Government of Iraq has increasingly taken responsibility for funding and management of large-scale reconstruction projects, including accepting the transfer of more than 130 Primary Health Care Centers throughout Iraq. The Department of State focused its efforts on targeted training and capacity development programs within the central and local governments so that the Iraqis could continue the reconstruction effort themselves and provide government services effectively. We trained 31,000 civil servants and another 36,000 Iraqis graduated from vocational training programs. Our diplomatic efforts in Baghdad have met with significant success including the passage of the Provincial Powers law by the Iraqi Council of Representatives and provincial and national elections are scheduled to be held in 2009. The security gains made possible as a result of the “surge” of coalition forces, the public’s rejection of extremist violence and the increasing ability of Iraqi Security Forces to take on more responsibility for securing the Iraqi population have helped create conditions under which Iraq’s economy has continued to grow.


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